ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2017 Dec 11

[submitted] SGRB World Model

SgrbWorldModel: Written in Fortran 90, this series of codes present an attempt at modeling the population distribution of the Short-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of SGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution, whose differential cosmological rate of occurrence follows the Star-Formation-Rate (SFR) convolved with a log-normal binary-merger delay-time distribution. The best-fit parameters of the model are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by the BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC)Sampler that is part of the code. A model for the detection algorithm of the BATSE detectors is also provided.

[submitted] LGRB World Model

LgrbWorldModel: Written in Fortran 90, this series of codes present an attempt at modeling the population distribution of the Long-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of LGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution. The best-fit parameters of the distribution are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC) Sampler.

2017 Dec 07

[submitted] WiseView: Visualizing Motion and Variability of Faint WISE Sources

WiseView is a browser-based tool for rendering image blinks of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) coadds spanning a multi-year time baseline. WiseView allows for easy visual identification of motion and variability for sources far beyond the single-frame detection limit, a key threshold not surmounted by many studies. WiseView transparently gathers small image cutouts drawn from many terabytes of unWISE coadds, facilitating access to this large and unique dataset. Users need only input the coordinates of interest, and can interactively tune parameters including the image stretch, colormap and blink rate. WiseView was developed in the context of the Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 citizen science project, and has already enabled hundreds of brown dwarf candidate discoveries made by citizen scientists and professional astronomers alike.

[ascl:1712.001] KDUtils: Kinematic Distance Utilities

The Kinematic Distance utilities (KDUtils) calculate kinematic distances and kinematic distance uncertainties. The package includes methods to calculate "traditional" kinematic distances as well as a Monte Carlo method to calculate kinematic distances and uncertainties.

2017 Dec 06

[submitted] HiGal SED Fitter

A tool for fitting modified blackbody SEDs to Herschel data, specifically targeted at Herschel Hi-Gal data.

2017 Nov 30

[ascl:1711.024] NOD3: Single dish reduction software

NOD3 processes and analyzes maps from single-dish observations affected by scanning effects from clouds, receiver instabilities, or radio-frequency interference. Its “basket-weaving” tool combines orthogonally scanned maps into a final map that is almost free of scanning effects. A restoration tool for dual-beam observations reduces the noise by a factor of about two compared to the NOD2 version. Combining single-dish with interferometer data in the map plane ensures the full recovery of the total flux density.

[ascl:1711.023] HBT+: Subhalo finder and merger tree builder

HBT+ is a hybrid subhalo finder and merger tree builder for cosmological simulations. It comes as an MPI edition that can be run on distributed clusters or shared memory machines and is MPI/OpenMP parallelized, and also as an OpenMP edition that can be run on shared memory machines and is only OpenMP parallelized. This version is more memory efficient than the MPI branch on shared memory machines, and is more suitable for analyzing zoomed-in simulations that are difficult to balance on distributed clusters. Both editions support hydro simulations with gas/stars.

[ascl:1711.022] HBT: Hierarchical Bound-Tracing

HBT is a Hierarchical Bound-Tracing subhalo finder and merger tree builder, for numerical simulations in cosmology. It tracks haloes from birth and continues to track them after mergers, finding self-bound structures as subhaloes and recording their merger histories as merger trees.

[ascl:1711.021] Bifrost: Stream processing framework for high-throughput applications

Bifrost is a stream processing framework that eases the development of high-throughput processing CPU/GPU pipelines. It is designed for digital signal processing (DSP) applications within radio astronomy. Bifrost uses a flexible ring buffer implementation that allows different signal processing blocks to be connected to form a pipeline. Each block may be assigned to a CPU core, and the ring buffers are used to transport data to and from blocks. Processing blocks may be run on either the CPU or GPU, and the ring buffer will take care of memory copies between the CPU and GPU spaces.

[ascl:1711.020] MARXS: Multi-Architecture Raytrace Xray mission Simulator

MARXS (Multi-Architecture-Raytrace-Xraymission-Simulator) simulates X-ray observatories. Primarily designed to simulate X-ray instruments on astronomical X-ray satellites and sounding rocket payloads, it can also be used to ray-trace experiments in the laboratory. MARXS performs polarization Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations from a source (astronomical or lab) through a collection of optical elements such as mirrors, baffles, and gratings to a detector.