ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Searching for codes credited to 'Thomas, R'

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[ascl:1304.017] CosmoRec: Cosmological Recombination code

CosmoRec solves the recombination problem including recombinations to highly excited states, corrections to the 2s-1s two-photon channel, HI Lyn-feedback, n>2 two-photon profile corrections, and n≥2 Raman-processes. The code can solve the radiative transfer equation of the Lyman-series photon field to obtain the required modifications to the rate equations of the resolved levels, and handles electron scattering, the effect of HeI intercombination transitions, and absorption of helium photons by hydrogen. It also allows accounting for dark matter annihilation and optionally includes detailed helium radiative transfer effects.

[ascl:1308.007] SYNAPPS: Forward-modeling of supernova spectroscopy data sets

SYNAPPS is a spectrum fitter embedding a highly parameterized synthetic SN spectrum calculation within a parallel asynchronous optimizer. This open-source code is aimed primarily at the problem of systematically interpreting large sets of SN spectroscopy data.

[ascl:1308.008] SYN++: Standalone SN spectrum synthesis

SYN++ is a standalone SN spectrum synthesis program. It is a rewrite of the original SYNOW (ascl:1010.055) code in modern C++. It offers further enhancements, a new structured input control file format, and the atomic data files have been repackaged and are more complete than those of SYNOW.

[ascl:1611.017] SNCosmo: Python library for supernova cosmology

SNCosmo synthesizes supernova spectra and photometry from SN models, and has functions for fitting and sampling SN model parameters given photometric light curve data. It offers fast implementations of several commonly used extinction laws and can be used to construct SN models that include dust. The SNCosmo library includes supernova models such as SALT2, MLCS2k2, Hsiao, Nugent, PSNID, SNANA and Whalen models, as well as a variety of built-in bandpasses and magnitude systems, and provides convenience functions for reading and writing peculiar data formats used in other packages. The library is extensible, allowing new models, bandpasses, and magnitude systems to be defined using an object-oriented interface.

[ascl:1901.007] Photon: Python tool for data plotting

Photon makes simple 1D plots in python. It uses mainly matplotlib and PyQt5 and has been build to be fully customizable, allowing the user to change the fontstyle, fontsize, fontcolors, linewidth of the axes, thickness, and other parameters, and see the changes directly in the plot. Once a customization is created, it can be saved in a configuration file and reloaded for future use, allowing reuse of the customization for other plots. The main tool is a graphical user interface and it is started using a command line interface.

[ascl:1901.008] SEDobs: Observational spectral energy distribution simulation

SEDobs uses state-of-the-art theoretical galaxy SEDs (spectral energy distributions) to create simulated observations of distant galaxies. It used BC03 and M05 theoretical models and allows the user to configure the simulated observation that are needed. For a given simulated galaxy, the user is able to simulate multi-spectral and multi-photometric observations.

[ascl:1904.017] dfitspy: A dfits/fitsort implementation in Python

dfitspy searches and displays metadata contained in FITS files. Written in Python, it displays the results of a metadata search and is able to grep certain values of keywords inside large samples of files in the terminal. dfitspy can be used directly with the command line interface and can also be imported as a python module into other python code or the python interpreter.

[ascl:1904.018] Specstack: A simple spectral stacking tool

Specstack creates stacked spectra using a simple algorithm with sigma-clipping to combine the spectra of galaxies in the rest-frame into a single averaged spectrum. Though written originally for galaxy spectra, it also works for other types of objects. It is written in Python and is started from the command-line.