ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2017 May 26

[ascl:1705.002] DMATIS: Dark Matter ATtenuation Importance Sampling

DMATIS (Dark Matter ATtenuation Importance Sampling) calculates the trajectories of DM particles that propagate in the Earth's crust and the lead shield to reach the DAMIC detector using an importance sampling Monte-Carlo simulation. A detailed Monte-Carlo simulation avoids the deficiencies of the SGED/KS method that uses a mean energy loss description to calculate the lower bound on the DM-proton cross section. The code implementing the importance sampling technique makes the brute-force Monte-Carlo simulation of moderately strongly interacting DM with nucleons computationally feasible. DMATIS is written in Python 3 and MATHEMATICA.

2017 May 25

[ascl:1705.001] COSMOS: Carnegie Observatories System for MultiObject Spectroscopy

COSMOS (Carnegie Observatories System for MultiObject Spectroscopy) reduces multislit spectra obtained with the IMACS and LDSS3 spectrographs on the Magellan Telescopes. It can be used for the quick-look analysis of data at the telescope as well as for pipeline reduction of large data sets. COSMOS is based on a precise optical model of the spectrographs, which allows (after alignment and calibration) an accurate prediction of the location of spectra features. This eliminates the line search procedure which is fundamental to many spectral reduction programs, and allows a robust data pipeline to be run in an almost fully automatic mode, allowing large amounts of data to be reduced with minimal intervention.

[submitted] f3: Full Frame Fotometry for Kepler Full Frame Images

Light curves from the Kepler telescope rely on "postage stamp" cutouts of a few pixels near each of 200,000 target stars. These light curves are optimized for the detection of short-term signals like planet transits but induce systematics that overwhelm long-term variations in stellar flux. Longer-term effects can be recovered through analysis of the Full Frame Images, a set of calibration data obtained monthly during the Kepler mission. f3 is a python package which provides a suite of tools for analyzing the Full Frame Images to infer long-term astrophysical variations in the brightness of Kepler targets, such as magnetic activity or sunspots on slowly rotating stars.

2017 May 23

[submitted] SPTCLASS: SPecTral CLASSificator code

SPTCLASS was designed for assigning semi-automatic spectral types to a sample of stars. The main code includes three spectral classification schemes: the first one is optimized to classify stars in the mass range of TTS (K5 or later; hereafter LATE-type scheme), the second one is optimized to classify stars in the mass range of IMTTS (F late to K early; hereafter Gtype scheme), and the third one is optimized to classify stars in the mass range of HAeBe (F5 or earlier; hereafter HAeBe scheme).

2017 May 22

[submitted] Probabilistic Cataloger (PCAT)

A recurring problem in astrostatistics is to compare models that have different numbers of parameters. One way to achieve this is to sample from the posterior probability distribution of each model given the data and then compare their Bayesian evidences. However, when the model dimensionality is high, noisy estimates of the Bayesian evidence may not be reliably distinguish models. Probabilistic Cataloger (PCAT) offers an alternative solution to this inverse problem, by sampling from the posterior distribution of a metamodel, i.e., union of models with different dimensionality. This is achieved via transdimensional proposals such as births, deaths, splits and merges in addition to the within-model proposals. The code has been applied in two different subfields of astronomy: high energy photometry, where transdimensional elements are gamma-ray point sources; and strong lensing, where light-deflecting dark matter subhalos take the role of transdimensional elements.

2017 Apr 30

[ascl:1704.014] Multipoles: Potential gain for binary lens estimation

Multipoles, written in Python, calculates the quadrupole and hexadecapole approximations of the finite-source magnification: quadrupole (Wk,rho,Gamma) and hexadecapole (Wk,rho,Gamma). The code is efficient and faster than previously available methods, and could be generalized for use on large portions of the light curves.

[ascl:1704.013] Difference-smoothing: Measuring time delay from light curves

The Difference-smoothing MATLAB code measures the time delay from the light curves of images of a gravitationally lendsed quasar. It uses a smoothing timescale free parameter, generates more realistic synthetic light curves to estimate the time delay uncertainty, and uses X2 plot to assess the reliability of a time delay measurement as well as to identify instances of catastrophic failure of the time delay estimator. A systematic bias in the measurement of time delays for some light curves can be eliminated by applying a correction to each measured time delay.

[ascl:1704.012] XID+: Next generation XID development

XID+ is a prior-based source extraction tool which carries out photometry in the Herschel SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) maps at the positions of known sources. It uses a probabilistic Bayesian framework that provides a natural framework in which to include prior information, and uses the Bayesian inference tool Stan to obtain the full posterior probability distribution on flux estimates.

[ascl:1704.011] VULCAN: Chemical Kinetics For Exoplanetary Atmospheres

VULCAN describes gaseous chemistry from 500 to 2500 K using a reduced C-H-O chemical network with about 300 reactions. It uses eddy diffusion to mimic atmospheric dynamics and excludes photochemistry, and can be used to examine the theoretical trends produced when the temperature-pressure profile and carbon-to-oxygen ratio are varied.

[ascl:1704.010] A-Track: Detecting Moving Objects in FITS images

A-Track is a fast, open-source, cross-platform pipeline for detecting moving objects (asteroids and comets) in sequential telescope images in FITS format. The moving objects are detected using a modified line detection algorithm.