ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2016 Aug 28

[submitted] OBERON - OBliquity and Energy balance Run on N body systems

This C++ code models the climate of Earthlike planets under the effects of an arbitrary number and arrangement of other bodies, such as stars, planets and moons.

The code simultaneously:

i) computes N body motions using a 4th order Hermite integrator,
ii) Simulates climates using a 1D latitudinal energy balance model,
iii) evolves the orbital spin of bodies using the equations of Laskar (1986a,b)

This code has been first used in Forgan (2016): Milankovitch Cycles of Terrestrial Planets in Binary Systems, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stw2098

2016 Aug 22

[ascl:1608.006] Gemini IRAF: Data reduction software for the Gemini telescopes

The Gemini IRAF package processes observational data obtained with the Gemini telescopes. It is an external package layered upon IRAF and supports data from numerous instruments, including FLAMINGOS-2, GMOS-N, GMOS-S, GNIRS, GSAOI, NIFS, and NIRI. The Gemini IRAF package is organized into sub-packages; it contains a generic tools package, "gemtools", along with instrument-specific packages. The raw data from the Gemini facility instruments are stored as Multi-Extension FITS (MEF) files. Therefore, all the tasks in the Gemini IRAF package, intended for processing data from the Gemini facility instruments, are capable of handling MEF files.

[submitted] Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution

Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with Nine Variables (BASE-9) is a Bayesian software suite that recovers star cluster and stellar parameters from photometry. BASE-9 is useful for analyzing single-age, single-metallicity star clusters, binaries, or single stars, and for simulating such systems. BASE-9 uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique along with bruteforce numerical integration to estimate the posterior probability distribution for the age, metallicity, helium abundance, distance modulus, line-of-sight absorption, and parameters of the initial-final mass relation (IFMR) for a cluster, and for the primary mass, secondary mass (if a binary), and cluster probability for every potential cluster member. The MCMC technique is used for the cluster quantities (first 6 items in the previous list) and numerical integration is used for the stellar quantities (last 3 items in the previous list). BASE-9 is freely available source code that you may use as is or modify for your own research and educational purposes.

2016 Aug 21

[ascl:1608.005] AstroVis: Visualizing astronomical data cubes

AstroVis enables rapid visualization of large data files on platforms supporting the OpenGL rendering library. Radio astronomical observations are typically three dimensional and stored as data cubes. AstroVis implements a scalable approach to accessing these files using three components: a File Access Component (FAC) that reduces the impact of reading time, which speeds up access to the data; the Image Processing Component (IPC), which breaks up the data cube into smaller pieces that can be processed locally and gives a representation of the whole file; and Data Visualization, which implements an approach of Overview + Detail to reduces the dimensions of the data being worked with and the amount of memory required to store it. The result is a 3D display paired with a 2D detail display that contains a small subsection of the original file in full resolution without reducing the data in any way.

2016 Aug 19

[submitted] PROFFIT: An interactive software for the analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

PROFFIT is a stand-alone software for the analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles, that can be used to analyze the data from any X-ray instrument. It has been used for the preparation of more than 20 scientific papers so far.

Features:
- Command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC package
- Extraction of surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center
- Surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors
- Excision of areas using SAODS9-compatible region files to exclude point sources
- Background map support to extract background profiles
- Fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law
- Fitting using chi-squared or C statistic
- Fitting on the surface-brightness or counts data
- Possibility to include a flat level of systematic uncertainty
- Possibility to define the radial range for fitting and to fix or let free the parameters
- 1, 2, and 3 sigma contour plots for a given set of parameters
- Accurate error calculation on the parameters at any confidence level
- Easy grouping of the bins to ensure a minimum number of counts or S/N per bin
- Interactive plotting interface inherited from ROOT
- Geometrical deprojection using the Kriss et al. method, allowing to easily derive deprojected density profiles
- Option to compute the azimuthal scatter of the profile split into different sectors
- Convolution of the profile with the instrumental PSF, using Gaussian or King profile
- Extraction of growth curves
- Option to save the results in FITS, ROOT or TXT format
- Possibility to save the deviations of the image from the best-fit surface-brightness profile to create a substructure image
- Interactive help with a description of all the commands

2016 Aug 15

[ascl:1608.004] BART: Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer fitting code

BART implements a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer scheme for extracting parameters from spectra of planetary atmospheres. BART combines a thermochemical-equilibrium code, a one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer code, and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module to constrain the atmospheric temperature and chemical-abundance profiles of exoplanets.

[ascl:1608.003] appaloosa: Python-based flare finding code for Kepler light curves

The appaloosa suite automates flare-finding in every Kepler light curves. It builds quiescent light curve models that include long- and short-cadence data through iterative de-trending and includes completeness estimates via artificial flare injection and recovery tests.

2016 Aug 14

[ascl:1608.002] pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

[ascl:1608.001] Stingray: Spectral-timing software

Stingray is a spectral-timing software package for astrophysical X-ray (and more) data. The package merges existing efforts for a (spectral-)timing package in Python and is composed of a library of time series methods (including power spectra, cross spectra, covariance spectra, and lags); scripts to load FITS data files from different missions; a simulator of light curves and event lists that includes different kinds of variability and more complicated phenomena based on the impulse response of given physical events (e.g. reverberation); and a GUI to ease the learning curve for new users.

2016 Jul 31

[ascl:1607.020] SEEK: Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer

SEEK (Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer) processes time-ordered-data from single dish radio telescopes or from the simulation pipline HIDE (ascl:1607.019), removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and recovers the astronomical radio signal. With its companion code HIDE (ascl:1607.019), it provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.