ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2016 Jun 21

[submitted] HIBAYES: Global 21-cm Bayesian Monte-Carlo Model Fitting

HIBAYES is a python implementation of the algorithm outlined in Bernardi et al. (2016) for fully-Bayesian extraction of the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization in the presence of foreground emission.

User-defined likelihood and prior functions are called by the sampler (py)MultiNEST in order to jointly explore the full (signal plus foreground) posterior probability distribution and evaluate the Bayesian evidence for a given model. Implemented models - for simulation and fitting - include gaussians (HI signal) and polynomials (foregrounds). Some simple plotting and analysis tools are supplied.

It is straightforward for the user to extend the code to other models (physical or empirical), to incorporate data from other experiments, or to use alternative Monte-Carlo sampling engines as required.

2016 Jun 13

[submitted] Cygrid: A fast Cython-powered convolution-based gridding module for Python

Cygrid is a Python module that can be used to grid (resample) data to any collection of spherical target coordinates, although its typical application involves FITS maps or data cubes. The FITS world coordinate system (WCS) standard is supported. The underlying algorithm is based on the convolution of the original samples with a 2D Gaussian kernel. A lookup table scheme allows us to parallelize the code and we combine it with the HEALPix tessellation of the sphere for fast neighbor searches. Cygrids runtime scales between O(n) and O(nlog n), with n being the number of input samples.

2016 Jun 11

[submitted] pyLCSIM - A python package to simulate X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models

pyLCSIM is a python package to simulate X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models.

Coherent signals can be specified as a sum of one or more sinusoids, each with its frequency, pulsed fraction and phase shift; or as a series of harmonics of a fundamental frequency (each with its pulsed fraction and phase shift).

Power spectra can be simulated from a model of the power spectrum density (PSD), using as a template one or more of the built-in library functions. The user can also define his/her custom models. Models are additive.

2016 Jun 09

[ascl:1606.002] PAL: Positional Astronomy Library

The PAL library is a partial re-implementation of Pat Wallace's popular SLALIB library written in C using a Gnu GPL license and layered on top of the IAU's SOFA library (or the BSD-licensed ERFA) where appropriate. PAL attempts to stick to the SLA C API where possible.

2016 Jun 04

[ascl:1606.001] SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

2016 May 31

[ascl:1605.017] Surprise Calculator: Estimating relative entropy and Surprise between samples

The Surprise is a measure for consistency between posterior distributions and operates in parameter space. It can be used to analyze either the compatibility of separately analyzed posteriors from two datasets, or the posteriors from a Bayesian update. The Surprise Calculator estimates relative entropy and Surprise between two samples, assuming they are Gaussian. The software requires the R package CompQuadForm to estimate the significance of the Surprise, and rpy2 to interface R with Python.

[ascl:1605.016] zeldovich-PLT: Zel'dovich approximation initial conditions generator

zeldovich-PLT generates Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) initial conditions (i.e. first-order Lagrangian perturbation theory) for cosmological N-body simulations, optionally applying particle linear theory (PLT) corrections. The code uses double precision internally, but output format can be set to single or double precision.

[ascl:1605.015] SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

[ascl:1605.014] DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

2016 May 30

[ascl:1605.013] grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).