ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2021 Nov 17

[submitted] Data modelling approaches to astronomical data - Mapping large spectral line data cubes to dimensional data models

As a new generation of large-scale telescopes are expected to produce single data products in the range of hundreds of GBs to multiple TBs, different approaches to I/O efficient data interaction and extraction need to be investigated and made available to researchers. This will become increasingly important as the downloading and distribution of TB scale data products will become unsustainable, and researchers will have to take their processing analysis to the data. We present a methodology to extract 3 dimensional spatial-spectral data from dimensionally modelled tables in Parquet format on a Hadoop system. The data is loaded into the Parquet tables from FITS cube files using a dedicated process. We compare the performance of extracting data using the Apache Spark parallel compute framework on top of the Parquet-Hadoop ecosystem with data extraction from the original source files on a shared file system. We have found that the Spark-Parquet-Hadoop solution provides significant performance benefits, particularly in a multi user environment. We present a detailed analysis of the single and multi-user experiments conducted and also discuss the benefits and limitations of the platform used for this study.

2021 Nov 04

[submitted] Realistic galaxy simulation via score-based generative models

We show that a Denoising Diffusion Probabalistic Model (DDPM), a class of score-based generative model, can be used to produce realistic yet fake images that mimic observations of galaxies. Our method is tested with Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument grz imaging of galaxies from the Photometry and Rotation curve OBservations from Extragalactic Surveys (PROBES) sample and galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Subjectively, the generated galaxies are highly realistic when compared with samples from the real dataset. We quantify the similarity by borrowing from the deep generative learning literature, using the ‘Fréchet Inception Distance’ to test for subjective and morphological similarity. We also introduce the ‘Synthetic Galaxy Distance’ metric to compare the emergent physical properties (such as total magnitude, colour and half light radius) of a ground truth parent and synthesised child dataset. We argue that the DDPM approach produces sharper and more realistic images than other generative methods such as Adversarial Networks (with the downside of more costly inference), and could be used to produce large samples of synthetic observations tailored to a specific imaging survey. We demonstrate two potential uses of the DDPM: (1) accurate in-painting of occluded data, such as satellite trails, and (2) domain transfer, where new input images can be processed to mimic the properties of the DDPM training set. Here we ‘DESI-fy’ cartoon images as a proof of concept for domain transfer. Finally, we suggest potential applications for score-based approaches that could motivate further research on this topic within the astronomical community.

2021 Nov 01

[submitted] Sky COllector of galaxy Pairs and Image Output (Scorpio)

We present the description of the project SCORPIO, a Python package for retrieving images and associated data of galaxy pairs
based on their position, facilitating visual analysis and data collation of multiple archetypal systems. The code ingests information
from SDSS, 2MASS and WISE surveys based on the available bands and is designed for studies of galaxy pairs as natural laboratories of multiple astrophysical phenomena such as tidal force deformation of galaxies, pressure gradient induced star formation
regions, morphological transformation, to name a few.

2021 Oct 31

[ascl:2110.022] XookSuut: Model circular and noncircular flows on 2D velocity maps

XookSuut models circular and noncircular flows on resolved velocity maps. The code performs nonparametric fits to derive kinematic models without assuming analytical functions on the different velocity components of the models. It recovers the circular and radial motions in galaxies in dynamical equilibrium and can derive the noncircular motions induced by oval distortions, such as that produced by stellar bars. XookSuut explores the full space of parameters on a N-dimensional space to derive their mean values; this combined method efficiently recovers the constant parameters and the different kinematic components.

[ascl:2110.021] PT-REX: Point-to-point TRend EXtractor

PT-REX (Point-to-point TRend EXtractor) performs ptp analysis on every kind of extended radio source. The code exploits a set of different fitting methods to allow study of the spatial correlation, and is structured in a series of tasks to handle the individual steps of a ptp analysis independently, from defining a grid to sample the radio emission to accurately analyzing the data using several statistical methods. A major feature of PT-REX is the use of an automatic, randomly-generated sampling routine to combine several SMptp analysis into a Monte Carlo ptp (MCptp) analysis. By repeating several cycles of SMptp analysis with randomly-generated grids, PT-REX produces a distribution of values of k that describe its parameter space, thus allowing a reliably estimate of the trend (and its uncertainties).

[ascl:2110.020] BCES: Linear regression for data with measurement errors and intrinsic scatter

BCES performs robust linear regression on (X,Y) data points where both X and Y have measurement errors. The fitting method is the bivariate correlated errors and intrinsic scatter (BCES). Some of the advantages of BCES regression compared to ordinary least squares fitting are that it allows for measurement errors on both variables and permits the measurement errors for the two variables to be dependent. Further it permits the magnitudes of the measurement errors to depend on the measurements and other lines such as the bisector and the orthogonal regression can be constructed.

[ascl:2110.019] SELCIE: Screening Equations Linearly Constructed and Iteratively Evaluated

SELCIE (Screening Equations Linearly Constructed and Iteratively Evaluated) investigates the chameleon model that arises from screening a scalar field introduced in some modified gravity models that is coupled to matter. The code provides tools to construct user defined meshes by utilizing the GMSH mesh generation software. These tools include constructing shapes whose boundaries are defined by some function or by constructing it out of basis shapes such as circles, cones and cylinders. The mesh can also be separated into subdomains, each of which having its own refinement parameters. These meshes can then be converted into a format that is compatible with the finite element software FEniCS. SELCIE uses FEniCS (ascl:2110.018) with a nonlinear solving method (Picard or Newton method) to solve the chameleon equation of motion for some parameters and density distribution. These density distributions are constructed by having the density profile of each subdomain being set by a user defined function, allowing for extremely customizable setups that are easy to implement.

[ascl:2110.018] FEniCS: Computing platform for solving partial differential equations

FEniCS solves partial differential equations (PDEs) and enables users to quickly translate scientific models into efficient finite element code. With the high-level Python and C++ interfaces to FEniCS, it is easy to get started, but FEniCS offers also powerful capabilities for more experienced programmers. FEniCS runs on a multitude of platforms ranging from laptops to high-performance clusters, and each component of the FEniCS platform has been fundamentally designed for parallel processing. This framework allows for rapid prototyping of finite element formulations and solvers on laptops and workstations, and the same code may then be deployed on large high-performance computers.

[ascl:2110.017] ThERESA: 3D Exoplanet Cartography

ThERESA retrieves three-dimensional maps of exoplanets. The code constructs 2-dimensional maps for each light given light curve, places those maps vertically in an atmosphere, and runs radiative transfer to calculate emission from the planet over a latitude/longitude grid. ThERESA then integrates over the grid (combined with the visibility function) to generate light curves. These light curves are compared against the input light curves behind MCMC to explore parameter space.

[ascl:2110.016] pyro: Deep universal probabilistic programming with Python and PyTorch

Pyro is a flexible, scalable deep probabilistic programming library built on PyTorch. It can represent any computable probability distribution and scales to large data sets with little overhead compared to hand-written code. The library is implemented with a small core of powerful, composable abstractions. Its high-level abstractions express generative and inference models, but also allows experts to customize inference.