ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2020 Mar 27

[submitted] Pulseblast 2

PulseBlast 2 is a mass directory scanner for Unix, Darwin and DOS/NT kernels that allows the user to analyze PSRFITS data all the way from raw time series to fully calibrated and RFI excised TOAs. Many PSRFITS software packages in the past have dealt with data on the scale of a single file and many optimization methods for pulsar data currently used are used in PulseBlast 2 for individual file analysis. However, what sets PulseBlast 2 apart is its optimization across many directories spread out across the OS. The program is entirely written in Python 3, with a scope to change string operations into Perl scripts.

2020 Mar 25

[submitted] tess-point

Tess-point converts astronomical target coordinates given in right ascension and declination to detector pixel coordinates for the MIT-led NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) spacecraft. The program can also provide detector pixel coordinates for a star by TESS input catalog identifier number and common astronomical name. Tess-point outputs the observing sector number, camera number, detector number, and pixel column and row. Original programming in C and focal plane geometry solutions by Alan Levine (MIT). This python translation by Christopher J. Burke (MIT).

2020 Mar 12

[submitted] The Locus Algorithm

We present the software system developed to implement the Locus Algorithm, a novel algorithm designed to maximise the performance of differential photometry systems by optimising the number and quality of reference stars in the Field of View with the target.

2020 Feb 29

[ascl:2002.022] DISKMODs: Accretion Disk Radial Structure Models

DISKMODs provides radial structure models of accretion disk solutions. The following models are included: Novikov-Thorne thin disk model and Sadowski polytropic slim disk model. Each model implements a common interface that gives the radial dependence of selected geometrical, physical and thermodynamic quantities of the accretion flow. The model interpolates through a set of tabulated numerical solutions. These solutions are computed for a reference mass M=10 Msun. The model can rescale the disk structure to any mass, with masses in the range of 5-20 Msun giving reasonably good results.

[ascl:2002.021] CR-SISTEM: Symplectic integrator for lunar core-mantle and orbital dynamics

CR-SISTEM models lunar orbital and rotational dynamics, taking into account the effects of a liquid core. Orbits of the Moon and Earth are fully integrated, and other planets (or additional point-mass satellites) may be included in the integration. Lunar and solar tides on Earth, eccentricity and obliquity tides on the Moon, and lunar core-mantle friction are included. The integrator is one file (crsistem5.for) written in FORTRAN 90, uses seven input files (settings.in, planets.in, moons.in, tidal.in, lunar.in, precess.in and core.in), and has at least eight output files (planet101.out, moon101.out, pole.out, spin_orb.out, spin_ecl.out, cspin_ecl.out, long.out and clong.out); additional moons and planets would add more output. The input files provided with the code set up a 1 Myr simulation of a slow-spinning Moon on an orbit of 40 Earth radii, which will then dynamically relax to the lowest-energy state (in this case it is a synchronous rotation with a core spinning separately from the mantle).

[ascl:2002.020] ExoCAM: Exoplanet Community Atmospheric Model

ExoCAM adapts the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) for planetary and exoplanetary applications. The system files, source code, initial conditions files, and namelists provided do not run standalone. ExoCAM is a patch to be used with standard distributions of CESM version 1.2.1 (http://www.cesm.ucar.edu/models/current.html), and is also intended to be run with ExoRT (ascl:2002.019), a correlated-k radiative transfer package.

[ascl:2002.019] ExoRT: Two-stream radiative transfer code

ExoRT is a flexible, two-stream radiative transfer code that interfaces with CAM/CESM (http://www.cesm.ucar.edu/models/current.html) or 1D offline; it is also used with ExoCAM (ascl:2002.020). Quadrature is used for shortwave and hemispheric mean is used for longwave. The gas phase optical depths are calculate using a correlated K-distribution method, with overlapping bands treated using an amount weighted scheme. Cloud optics are treated using mie scattering for both liquid and ice clouds, and cloud overlap is treated using Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation.

[ascl:2002.018] Bayesfit: Command-line program for combining Tempo2 and MultiNest components

Bayesfit pulls together Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) and MultiNest (ascl:1109.006) components to provide additional functionality such as the specification of priors; Nelder–Mead optimization of the maximum-posterior point; and the capability of computing the partially marginalized likelihood for a given subset of timing-model parameters. Bayesfit is a single python command-line application.

[ascl:2002.017] libstempo: Python wrapper for Tempo2

libstempo uses the Tempo2 library (ascl:1210.015) to load a pulsar's tim/par files, providing Python access to the TOAs, the residuals, the timing-model parameters, the fit procedure, and more.

[ascl:2002.016] Cobra: Bayesian pulsar searching

Cobra uses single pulse time series data to search for and time pulsars, performing a fully phase coherent timing analysis. The GPU-accelerated Bayesian analysis package, written in Python, incorporates models for both isolated and accelerated systems, as well as both Keplerian and relativistic binaries. Cobra builds a model pulse train that incorporates effects such as aliasing, scattering and binary motion and a simple Gaussian profile and compares this directly to the data; the software can thus combine data over multiple frequencies, epochs, or even across telescopes.