ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2021 Jul 22

[submitted] nimbus : A Bayesian inference framework to constrain kilonova models

nimbus is a hierarchical Bayesian framework to infer the intrinsic luminosity parameters of kilonovae (KNe) associated with gravitational-wave (GW) events, based purely on non-detections. This framework makes use of GW 3-D distance information and electromagnetic upper limits from a given survey for multiple events, and self-consistently accounts for finite sky-coverage and probability of astrophysical origin.

[submitted] snmachine

snmachine is a flexible python library for reading in photometric supernova light curves, extracting useful features from them, and subsequently performing supervised machine learning to classify supernovae based on their light curves. The library is also flexible enough to easily extend to general transient classification.

2021 Jul 14

[submitted] DviSukta: Spherically Averaged Bispectrum calculator

DviSukta calculates the Spherically Averaged Bispectrum (SABS). The code is based on an optimized direct estimation method, is written in C, and is parallelized. The code starts by reading the real space gridded data and performing a 3D Fourier transform of it. Alternatively, it starts by reading the data already in Fourier space. The grid spacing, number of k1 bins, number of n bins, and number of cos(theta) bins need to be specified in the input file.

[submitted] ReionYuga: Semi-numerical code to generate the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) neutral Hydrogen (HI) field

The C code ReionYuga generates the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) neutral Hydrogen (HI) field (successively the redshifted 21-cm signal) within a cosmological simulation box using semi-numerical techniques.

[submitted] FoF-Halo-finder: Halo location and size

FoF-Halo-finder identifies the location and size of collapsed objects (halos) within a cosmological simulation box. Written in C, it is based on the friends-of-friends (FoF) algorithm.

[submitted] PMN-body: Particle Mesh (PM) N-body code

PMN-body computes the non-linear evolution of the cosmological matter density contrast. It is based on the Particle Mesh (PM) technique. Written in C, the code is parallelized for shared-memory machines using Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP).

2021 Jul 13

[submitted] AlignBandColors: An inter-color-band image alignment tool

AlignBandColors (ABC) is a program that aligns inter-color-band astronomical images to a 100th of a pixel accuracy using surrounding stars as guiding points. It has currently been tested with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 images only, but is designed to be survey-independent.

[submitted] FUKA: Frankfurt Uni./Kadath Initial Data Solvers

FUKA consists of a collection of spectral initial data solvers which allow one to explore a vast range of the parameter space available when assuming conformal flatness including eccentricity reduced initial data of binaries composed of highly compact, asymmetric, and highly spinning objects (BNS, BBH, and BHNS).

In the case of binaries that include a neutron star, the source terms can be solved using a tabulated or polytropic equation of state.

2021 Jul 09

[submitted] GalaXimView

GalaXimView (for Galaxies Simulations Viewer) is a python3+matplotlib tool designed to visualise simulations which use particles, providing notably a rotatable 3D view and corresponding projections in 2D, together with a way of navigating through snapshots of a simulation keeping the same projection.

2021 Jul 07

[submitted] Photodissociation Region Toolbox

Ultraviolet photons from O and B stars strongly influence the structure and emission spectra of the interstellar medium. The UV photons energetic enough to ionize hydrogen (hv > 13.6eV ) will create the H II region around the star, but lower energy UV photons escape. These far-UV photons (6 eV < hv < 13.6 eV) are still energetic enough to photodissociate molecules and to ionize low ionization-potential atoms such as carbon, silicon, and sulfur. They thus create a photodissociation region (PDR) just outside the H II region. In aggregate, these PDRs dominates the heating and cooling of the neutral interstellar medium.

The PDR Toolbox is a science-enabling Python package for the community, designed to help astronomers determine the physical parameters of photodissociation regions from observations. Typical observations of both Galactic and extragalactic PDRs come from ground- and space-based millimeter, submillimeter, and far-infrared telescopes such as ALMA, SOFIA, JWST, Spitzer, and Herschel. Given a set of observations of spectral line or continuum intensities, PDR Toolbox can compute best-fit FUV incident intensity and cloud density based on our models of PDR emission.