ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Searching for codes credited to 'Heller, René'

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[ascl:1802.012] PyOSE: Orbital sampling effect (OSE) simulator

PyOSE is a fully numerical orbital sampling effect (OSE) simulator that can model arbitrary inclinations of the transiting moon orbit. It can be used to search for exomoons in long-term stellar light curves such as those by Kepler and the upcoming PLATO mission.

[ascl:1803.009] SETI-EC: SETI Encryption Code

The SETI Encryption code, written in Python, creates a message for use in testing the decryptability of a simulated incoming interstellar message. The code uses images in a portable bit map (PBM) format, then writes the corresponding bits into the message, and finally returns both a PBM image and a text (TXT) file of the entire message. The natural constants (c, G, h) and the wavelength of the message are defined in the first few lines of the code, followed by the reading of the input files and their conversion into 757 strings of 359 bits to give one page. Each header of a page, i.e. the little-endian binary code translation of the tempo-spatial yardstick, is calculated and written on-the-fly for each page.

[ascl:1806.014] pile-up: Monte Carlo simulations of star-disk torques on hot Jupiters

The pile-up gnuplot script generates a Monte Carlo simulation with a selectable number of randomized drawings (1000 by default, ~1min on a modern laptop). For each realization, the script calculates the torque acting on a hot Jupiter around a young, solar-type star as a function of the star-planet distance. The total torque on the planet is composed of the disk torque in the type II migration regime (that is, the planet is assumed to have opened up a gap in the disk) and of the stellar tidal torque. The model has four free parameters, which are drawn from a normal or lognormal distribution: (1) the disk's gas surface density at 1 astronomical unit, (2) the magnitude of tidal dissipation within the star, (3) the disk's alpha viscosity parameter, and (4) and the mean molecular weight of the gas in the disk midplane. For each realization, the total torque is screened for a distance at which it becomes zero. If present, then this distance would represent a tidal migration barrier to the planet. In other words, the planet would stop migrating. This location is added to a histogram on top of the main torque-over-distance panel and the realization is counted as one case that contributes to the overall survival rate of hot Jupiters. Finally, the script generates an output file (PDF by default) and prints the hot Jupiter survival rate for the assumed parameterization of the star-planet-disk system.

[ascl:1907.030] Wōtan: Stellar detrending methods

Wōtan provides free and open source algorithms to remove trends from time-series data automatically as an aid to to search efficiently for transits in stellar light curves from surveys. The toolkit helps determine empirically the best tool for a given job, serving as a one-stop solution for various smoothing tasks.

[ascl:1910.007] TLS: Transit Least Squares

TLS is an optimized transit-fitting algorithm to search for periodic transits of small planets. In contrast to BLS: Box Least Squares (ascl:1607.008), which searches for rectangular signals in stellar light curves, TLS searches for transit-like features with stellar limb-darkening and including the effects of planetary ingress and egress. TLS also analyses the entire, unbinned data of the phase-folded light curve. TLS yields a ~10% higher detection efficiency (and similar false alarm rates) compared to BLS though has a higher computational load. This load is partly compensated for by applying an optimized period sampling and transit duration sampling constrained to the physically plausible range.