ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2021 Oct 25

[submitted] AllStarFit: An Experimental R package for source detection, PSF and multi-component galaxy fitting

AllStarFit is an experimental R package that includes functions for analyzing optical/infrared images, including:
- object detection and image segmentation using the ProFound package;
- PSF determination using the ProFit package to fit multiple stars in the field simultaneously; and
- galaxy modelling with ProFit, using the previously determined PSF and user-specified models.

AllStarFit supports a variety of optimization methods (provided by external packages), including maximum-likelihood and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC).

2021 Oct 19

[submitted] TULIPS: a Tool for Understanding the Lives, Interiors, and Physics of Stars

TULIPS creates diagrams of the structure and evolution of stars. It creates plots and movies based on output from the MESA stellar evolution code. TULIPS represents stars as circles of varying size and color. tulips' capabilities include visualizing the size and perceived color of stars, their interior mixing and nuclear burning processes, their chemical composition, and comparing different MESA models. Documentation can be found at https://astro-tulips.readthedocs.io

2021 Oct 17

[submitted] PSRDADA - Distributed Acquisition and Data Analysis for Radio Astronomy

PSRDADA is an Open Source software project to support the development of distributed data acquisition and analysis systems. The authors of the code use it primarily in the implementation of baseband recording and processing instrumentation for radio pulsar astronomy. At the lowest level, PSRDADA is a flexible and well-managed ring buffer in shared memory with a variety of applications for piping data from device to ring buffer and from ring buffer to device. More than one data set may be queued in the ring buffer at one time, and data may be recorded in selected bursts using data validity flags. A variety of clients have been implemented that can write data to the ring buffer and read data from it. The primary write clients can be controlled via a simple, text-based socket interface, and read client software exists for writing data to an array of disks, sending data to an array of nodes, or processing the data directly from RAM. At the highest level of control and configuration, scripts have been written to launch the PSRDADA configuration across all nodes in the cluster, monitor all relevant processes, configure and control through a web-based interface, interface with observatory scheduling tools, and manage the ownership and archival of project data.

2021 Oct 13

[ascl:2110.001] JWSTSim: Geometric-Focused JWST Deep Field Image Simulation

JWST_Simulation generates a novel geometric-focused deep field simulation of the expected JWST future deep field image. Galaxies are represented by ellipses with randomly-generated positions and orientations. Three scripts are included: a deterministic simulation, an ensemble simulation, and a more-realistic monochrome image simulation. The following initial conditions can be perturbed in these codes: H0, Ωm, ΩΛ, the dark energy equation of state parameter, the number of unseen galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field Image (HUDF), the increase in effective radius due to the JWST’s higher sensitivity, the anisotropy of dark energy, and the maximum redshift reached by the JWST. Galaxy number densities are estimated using integration over comoving volume with an integration constant calibrated with the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. A galaxy coverage percentage is calculated for each image to determine the percentage of the background occupied by galaxies.

[submitted] Defringe

This code corrects fringe artefacts in near-infrared astronomical images taken with old generation CCD cameras. It essentially solves a robust PCA problem, masking out astrophysical sources, and models the contaminants as a linear superposition of (unknown) modes, with (unknown) projection coefficients. The problem uses nuclear norm regularization, which acts as a convex proxy for rank minimization.
The code is written in python, using cupy for GPU acceleration, but will also work on CPUs.

2021 Oct 06

[submitted] Interferopy: analysing datacubes from radio-to-submm observations

Interferopy is a Python package for the analysis of datacubes from radio-to-submm observations. It provides a homogenous interface to common tasks, making it easy to go from reduced datacubes to essential measurements and publication-quality plots. Its core functionalities are widely applicable and have been successfully tested on (but are not limited to) ALMA, NOEMA, VLA and JCMT data.

2021 Oct 04

[submitted] exodetbox

Mathematical methods for calculating the planet-star separation and difference in magnitude extrema as well as when planets have particular planet-star separations or differences in magnitude.

2021 Sep 30

[ascl:2109.030] Snowball: Generalizable atmospheric mass loss calculator

Snowball models atmospheric loss in order to constrain an atmosphere's cumulative impact of historic X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation-driven mass loss. The escape model interpolates the BaSTI luminosity evolution grid to the observed mass and luminosity of the host star.

[ascl:2109.029] BiPoS1: Dynamical processing of the initial binary star population

BiPoS1 (Binary Population Synthesizer) efficiently calculates binary distribution functions after the dynamical processing of a realistic population of binary stars during the first few Myr in the hosting embedded star cluster. It is particularly useful for generating a realistic birth binary population as an input for N-body simulations of globular clusters. Instead of time-consuming N-body simulations, BiPoS1 uses the stellar dynamical operator, which determines the fraction of surviving binaries depending on the binding energy of the binaries. The stellar dynamical operator depends on the initial star cluster density, as well as the time until the residual gas of the star cluster is expelled. At the time of gas expulsion, the dynamical processing of the binary population is assumed to effectively end due to the expansion of the star cluster related to that event. BiPoS1 has also a galactic-field mode, in order to synthesize the stellar population of a whole galaxy.

[ascl:2109.028] Healpix.jl: Julia-only port of the HEALPix library

Healpix.jl is a Julia-only port of the C/C++/Fortran/Python HEALPix library (ascl:1107.018), which implements a hierarchical pixelization of the sphere in equal-area pixels. Much like the original library, Healpix.jl supports two enumeration schemes for the pixels (RING and NESTED) and implements an optimized computation of the generalized Fourier transform using spherical harmonics, binding libsharp2 (ascl:1402.033). In addition, Healpix.jl provides four additional features: 1.) it fully supports Windows systems, alongside the usual Linux and MAC OS X machines; 2.) it uses Julia's strong typesystem to prevent several bugs related to mismatches in map ordering (e.g., combining a RING map with a NESTED map); 3.) it uses a versatile memory layout so that map bytes can be stored in shared memory objects or on GPUs; and 4.) it implements an elegant and general way to signal missing values in maps.