ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2022 Jan 06

[submitted] BLOS Mapping Code: Determining the Line-of-Sight Component of Magnetic Fields Associated with Molecular clouds

BLOS Mapping code determines the line-of-sight component of magnetic fields associated with molecular clouds, using the technique of Tahani et al. (2018). The code uses Faraday rotation measure catalogs along with an on-off approach based on relative measurements to estimate the rotation measure caused by molecular clouds. It then uses the outputs from a chemical evolution code along with extinction maps to determine the line-of-sight magnetic field strength and direction.

2022 Jan 04

[submitted] pyExoRaMa: an interactive tool to investigate the radius-mass diagram for exoplanets

We present the python version of the software originally developed with Mathematica by Li Zeng (reference in the Paper).

The code represents a very useful tool for visualizing and manipulating data related to extrasolar planets (or exoplanets, i.e., planets discovered in orbit around stars different from the Sun) and their host stars in a multi-dimensional parameter space. Its versatility enables statistical studies based on the large and constantly increasing number of detected exoplanets, to identify possible interdependence among several physical parameters, and to compare observables with theoretical models describing the exoplanet composition and structure.

Our transposition to python presents some new features with respect to the original version, and due to the popularity of python in the astrophysics community, the tool is made accessible by a larger number of users interested in exoplanet studies.

2021 Dec 31

[ascl:2112.027] JexoSim 2.0: JWST Exoplanet Observation Simulator

JexoSim 2.0 (JWST Exoplanet Observation Simulator) simulates exoplanet transit observations using all four instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope, and is designed for the planning and validation of science cases for JWST. The code generates synthetic spectra that capture the full impact of complex noise sources and systematic trends, allowing for assessment of both accuracy and precision in the final spectrum. JexoSim does not contain all known systematics for the various instruments, but is a good starting point to investigate the effects of systematics, and has the framework to incorporate more systematics in the future.

[ascl:2112.026] HoloSim-ML: Analyzing radio holography measurements of complex optical systems

HoloSim-ML performs beam simulation and analysis of radio holography data from complex optical systems. The code uses machine learning to efficiently determine the position of hundreds of mirror adjusters on multiple mirrors with few micron accuracy.

2021 Dec 30

[ascl:2112.025] FTP: Fast Template Periodogram

The Fast Template Periodogram extends the Generalised Lomb Scargle periodogram (Zechmeister and Kurster 2009) for arbitrary (periodic) signal shapes. A template is first approximated by a truncated Fourier series of length H. The Nonequispaced Fast Fourier Transform NFFT is used to efficiently compute frequency-dependent sums. Template fitting can now be done in NlogN time, improving existing algorithms by an order of magnitude for even small datasets. The FTP can be used in conjunction with gradient descent to accelerate a non-linear model fit, or be used in place of the multi-harmonic periodogram for non-sinusoidal signals with a priori known shapes.

[ascl:2112.024] l1p: Python implementation of the l1 periodogram

The l1 periodogram searches for periodicities in unevenly sampled time series. It can be used similarly as a Lomb-Scargle periodogram, and retrieves a figure which has a similar aspect but has fewer peaks due to aliasing. It is primarily designed for the search of exoplanets in radial velocity data, but can be also used for other purposes. The principle of the algorithm is to search for a representation of the input signal as a sum of a small number of sinusoidal components, that is a representation which is sparse in the frequency domain. Here, "small number" means small compared to the number of observations.

[ascl:2112.023] wpca: Weighted Principal Component Analysis in Python

wpca, written in Python, offers several implementations of Weighted Principal Component Analysis and uses an interface similar to scikit-learn's sklearn.decomposition.PCA. Implementations include a direct decomposition of a weighted covariance matrix to compute principal vectors, and then a weighted least squares optimization to compute principal components, and an iterative expectation-maximization approach to solve simultaneously for the principal vectors and principal components of weighted data. It also includes a standard non-weighted PCA implemented using the singular value decomposition, primarily to be useful for testing.

[ascl:2112.022] hankl: Python implementation of the FFTLog algorithm for cosmology

hankl implements the FFTLog algorithm in lightweight Python code. The FFTLog algorithm can be thought of as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a logarithmically spaced periodic sequence (= Hankel Transform). hankl consists of two modules, the General FFTLog module and the Cosmology one. The latter is suited for modern cosmological application and relies heavily on the former to perform the Hankel transforms. The accuracy of the method usually improves as the range of integration is enlarged; FFTlog prefers an interval that spans many orders of magnitude. Resolution is important, as low resolution introduces sharp features which in turn causes ringing.

[ascl:2112.021] GRIT: Gravitational Rigid-body InTegrators for simulating coupled dynamics

GRIT (Gravitational Rigid-body InTegrators) simulaties the coupled dynamics of both spin and orbit of N gravitationally interacting rigid bodies. The code supports tidal forces and general relativity correction are supported, and multiple schemes with different orders of convergences and splitting strategies are available. Multiscale splittings boost the simulation speed, and force evaluations can be parallelized. In addition, each body can be set to be a rigid body or just a point mass, and the floating-point format can be customized as float, double, or long double globally.

[ascl:2112.020] BayesicFitting: Model fitting and Bayesian evidence calculation package

BayesicFitting fits models to data. Data in this context means a set of (measured) points x and y. The model provides some (mathematical) relation between the x and y. Fitting adapts the model such that certain criteria are optimized. The BayesicFitting toolbox also determines whether one model fits the data better than another, making the toolbox particularly powerful. The package consists of more than 100 Python classes, of which one third are model classes. Another third are fitters in one guise or another along with additional tools, and the remaining third is used for Nested Sampling.