ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2018 Jul 13

[ascl:1807.015] CAESAR: Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition

CAESAR extracts and parameterizes both compact and extended sources from astronomical radio interferometric maps. The processing pipeline is a series of stages that can run on multiple cores and processors. After local background and rms map computation, compact sources are extracted with flood-fill and blob finder algorithms, processed (selection + deblending), and fitted using a 2D gaussian mixture model. Extended source search is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source removal and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by a final segmentation. Different algorithms are available for image filtering and segmentation. The outputs delivered to the user include source fitted and shape parameters, regions and contours. Written in C++, CAESAR is designed to handle the large-scale surveys planned with the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and its precursors.

2018 Jul 12

[ascl:1807.014] SPEGID: Single-Pulse Event Group IDentification

SPEGID (Single-Pulse Event Group IDentification) identifies astrophysical pulse candidates as trial single-pulse event groups (SPEGs) by first applying Density Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) on trial single-pulse events and then merging the clusters that fall within the expected DM (Dispersion Measure) and time span of astrophysical pulses. SPEGID also calculates the peak score for each SPEG in the S/N versus DM space to identify the expected peak-like shape in the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio versus DM curve of astrophysical pulses. Additionally, SPEGID groups SPEGs that appear at a consistent DM and therefore are likely emitted from the same source. After running SPEGID, periocity.py can be used to find (or verify) the underlying periodicity among a group of SPEGs (i.e., astrophysical pulse candidates).

2018 Jul 11

[ascl:1807.013] CLASSgal: Relativistic cosmological large scale structure code

CLASSgal computes large scale structure observables; it includes all relativistic corrections and computes both the power spectrum Cl(z1,z2) and the corresponding correlation function ξ(θ, z1, z2) of the matter density and the galaxy number fluctuations in linear perturbation theory. These quantities contain the full information encoded in the large scale matter distribution at the level of linear perturbation theory for Gaussian initial perturbations. CLASSgal is a modified version of CLASS (ascl:1106.020).

[ascl:1807.012] AngPow: Fast computation of accurate tomographic power spectra

AngPow computes the auto (z1 = z2) and cross (z1 ≠ z2) angular power spectra between redshift bins (i.e. Cℓ(z1,z2)). The developed algorithm is based on developments on the Chebyshev polynomial basis and on the Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature method. AngPow is flexible and can handle any user-defined power spectra, transfer functions, bias functions, and redshift selection windows. The code is fast enough to be embedded inside programs exploring large cosmological parameter spaces through the Cℓ(z1,z2) comparison with data.

[ascl:1807.011] nfield: Stochastic tool for QFT on inflationary backgrounds

nfield uses a stochastic formalism to compute the IR correlation functions of quantum fields during cosmic inflation in n-field dimensions. This is a necessary 1-loop resummation of the correlation functions to render them finite. The code supports the implementation of n-numbers of coupled test fields (energetically sub-dominant) as well as non-test fields.

2018 Jul 10

[ascl:1807.010] THOR: Global Circulation Model for planetary atmospheres

THOR solves the three-dimensional nonhydrostatic Euler equations. The code implements an icosahedral grid for the poles where converging meridians lead to increasingly smaller time steps; irregularities in the grid are smoothed using spring dynamics. THOR is designed to run on graphics processing units (GPUs) and is part of the open-source Exoclimes Simulation Platform.

[ascl:1807.009] HELIOS: Radiative transfer code for exoplanetary atmospheres

HELIOS, a radiative transfer code, is constructed for studying exoplanetary atmospheres. The model atmospheres of HELIOS are one-dimensional and plane-parallel, and the equation of radiative transfer is solved in the two-stream approximation with non-isotropic scattering. Though HELIOS can be used alone, the opacity calculator HELIOS-K (ascl:1503.004) can be used with it to provide the molecular opacities.

[ascl:1807.008] HII-CHI-mistry_UV: Oxygen abundance and ionizionation parameters for ultraviolet emission lines

HII-CHI-mistry_UV derives oxygen and carbon abundances using the ultraviolet (UV) lines emitted by the gas phase ionized by massive stars. The code first fixes C/O using ratios of appropriate emission lines and, in a second step, calculates O/H and the ionization parameter from carbon lines in the UV. An optical version of this Python code, HII-CHI-mistry (ascl:1807.007), is also available.

[ascl:1807.007] HII-CHI-mistry: Oxygen abundance and ionizionation parameters for optical emission lines

HII-CHI-mistry calculates the oxygen abundance for gaseous nebulae ionized by massive stars using optical collisionally excited emission lines. This code takes the extinction-corrected emission line fluxes and, based on a Χ2 minimization on a photoionization models grid, determines chemical-abundances (O/H, N/O) and ionization parameters. An ultraviolet version of this Python code, HII-CHI-mistry-UV (ascl:1807.008), is also available.

[ascl:1807.006] pyqz: Emission line code

pyqz computes the values of log(Q) [the ionization parameter] and 12+log(O/H) [the oxygen abundance, either total or in the gas phase] for a given set of strong emission lines fluxes from HII regions. The log(Q) and 12+log(O/H) values are interpolated from a finite set of diagnostic line ratio grids computed with the MAPPINGS V code (ascl:1807.005). The grids used by pyqz are chosen to be flat, without wraps, to decouple the influence of log(Q) and 12+log(O/H) on the emission line ratios.