ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Welcome to the ASCL

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry and repository for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists, including solar system astronomers, and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science and is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).


Most Recently Added Codes

2024 Mar 03

[submitted] Pynkowski

A Python package to compute Minkowski Functionals and other higher order statistics of input fields, as well as their expected values for different kinds of fields.

The statistics currently supported by this package are Minkowski functionals, and maxima and minima distributions. The formats currently supported for input data are the following: scalar HEALPix maps, as the ones used by healpy; polarisation HEALPix maps in the SO(3) formalism; 2D and 3D numpy arrays (coming soon). The theoretical expectation of some statistics is currently supported for the following theoretical fields: Gaussian fields (such as CMB Temperature or the initial density field); Chi squared fields (such as CMB polarization intensity); spin 2 maps in the SO(3) formalism.

We are actively working on the implementation of more statistics, data formats, and theoretical fields. If you want to contribute, we welcome and appreciate pull requests. If you have any comments or suggestions, please feel free to contact us by email (1 and 2) or by opening a discussion thread or issue.

The repository can be found on https://github.com/javicarron/pynkowski.

2024 Feb 28

[ascl:2402.010] 2cosmos: Monte Python modification for two independent instances of CLASS

2cosmos is a modification of Monte Python (ascl:1307.002) and allows the user to write likelihood modules that can request two independent instances of CLASS (ascl:1106.020) and separate dictionaries and structures for all cosmological and nuisance parameters. The intention is to be able to evaluate two independent cosmological calculations and their respective parameters within the same likelihood. This is useful for evaluating a likelihood using correlated datasets (e.g. mutually exclusive subsets of the same dataset for which one wants to take into account all correlations between the subsets).

2024 Feb 27

[ascl:2402.009] SkyLine: Generate mock line-intensity maps

SkyLine generates mock line-intensity maps (both in 3D and 2D) in a lightcone from a halo catalog, accounting for the evolution of clustering and astrophysical properties, and observational effects such as spectral and angular resolutions, line-interlopers, and galactic foregrounds. Using a given astrophysical model for the luminosity of each line, the code paints the signal for each emitter and generates the map, adding coherently all contributions of interest. In addition, SkyLine can generate maps with the distribution of Luminous Red Galaxies and Emitting Line Galaxies.

[ascl:2402.008] star_shadow: Analyze eclipsing binary light curves, find eccentricity, and more

star_shadow automatically analyzes space based light curves of eclipsing binaries and provide a measurement of eccentricity, among other parameters. It measures the timings of eclipses using the time derivatives of the light curves, using a model of orbital harmonics obtained from an initial iterative prewhitening of sinusoids. Since the algorithm extracts the harmonics from the rest of the sinusoidal variability eclipse timings can be measured even in the presence of other (astrophysical) signals, thus determining the orbital eccentricity automatically from the light curve along with information about the other variability present in the light curve. The output includes, but is not limited to, a sinusoid plus linear model of the light curve, the orbital period, the eccentricity, argument of periastron, and inclination.

[ascl:2402.007] ECLIPSR: Automatically find individual eclipses in light curves, determine ephemerides, and more

ECLIPSR fully and automatically analyzes space based light curves to find eclipsing binaries and provide some first order measurements, such as the binary star period and eclipse depths. It provides a recipe to find individual eclipses using the time derivatives of the light curves, including eclipses in light curves of stars where the dominating variability is, for example, pulsations. Since the algorithm detects each eclipse individually, even light curves containing only one eclipse can (in principle) be successfully analyzed and classified. ECLIPSR can find eclipsing binaries among both pulsating and non-pulsating stars in a homogeneous and quick manner and process large amounts of light curves in reasonable amounts of time. The output includes, among other things, the individual eclipse markers, the period and time of first (primary) eclipse, and a score between 0 and 1 indicating the likelihood that the analyzed light curve is that of an eclipsing binary.

[ascl:2402.006] polarizationtools: Polarization analysis and simulation tools in python

polarizationtools converts, analyzes, and simulates polarization data. The different python scripts (1) convert Stokes parameters into linear polarization parameters with proper treatment of the uncertainties and vice versa; (2) shift electric vector position angle (EVPA) data points in time series to account for the 180 degrees ambiguity; (3) identify rotations of the EVPA e.g. in blazar polarization monitoring data according to various rotation definitions; and (4) simulate polarization time series as a random walk in the Stokes Q-U plane.

2024 Feb 25

[submitted] TAT: Timing Analysis Toolkit for high-energy pulsar astrophysics

The TAT-pulsar (Timing Analysis Toolkit for Pulsars) package is a specialized toolkit designed for handling the scientific intricacies of pulsar timing. It provides a suite of Python-based utilities and scripts that facilitate the analysis, processing, and visualization of pulsar data. By leveraging observational data from pulsars, along with the associated physical processes and statistical characteristics, TAT-pulsar integrates a series of useful tools and data analysis scripts specifically developed for both isolated pulsars and binary systems. This enables swift analysis and the detailed presentation of timing properties in the high-energy pulsar field. Developed and implemented completely independently from other pulsar timing software such as Stingray (ascl:1608.001) and PINT (ascl:1902.007), TAT-pulsar serves as a valuable cross-checking and supplementary tool for data analysis.

2024 Feb 18

[submitted] GalMOSS: A package for GPU-accelerated Galaxy Profile Fitting

We introduce GalMOSS, a Python-based, Torch-powered tool for two-dimensional fitting of galaxy profiles. By seamlessly enabling GPU parallelization, GalMOSS meets the high computational demands of large-scale galaxy surveys, placing galaxy profile fitting in the LSST-era. It incorporates widely used profiles such as the Sérsic, Exponential disk, Ferrer, King, Gaussian, and Moffat profiles, and allows for the easy integration of more complex models. Tested on 8,289 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) g-band with a single NVIDIA A100 GPU, GalMOSS completed classical Sérsic profile fitting in about 10 minutes. Benchmark tests show that GalMOSS achieves computational speeds that are 6 $\times$ faster than those of default implementations.

2024 Feb 14

[ascl:2402.005] MGPT: Modified Gravity Perturbation Theory code

MGPT (Modified Gravity Perturbation Theory) computes 2-point statistics for LCDM model, DGP and Hu-Sawicky f(R) gravity. Written in C, the code can be easily modified to include other models. Specifically, it computes the SPT matter power spectrum, SPT Lagrangian-biased tracers power spectrum, and the CLPT matter correlation function. MGPT also computes the CLPT Lagrangian-biased tracers correlation function and a set of Q and R functionsfrom which other statistics, as leading order bispectrum, can be constructed.

[ascl:2402.004] CCBH-Numerics: Cosmologically-coupled-black-holes formation mass numerics

CCBH-Numerics (previously called CCBH-PLPP) computes the probability of the existence of a single cosmologically coupled black hole (BH) with a formation mass below a specified threshold for given observational data of binary black holes (BBHs) from gravitational waves. The code uses the unbiased population of BBHs, as given by the power-law-plus-peak (PLPP) profile, as the observational input, and assumes that the detected BBHs are formed from stellar evolution, not primordial BHs. CCBH-Numerics also works with individual data from BBHs and for NSBH pairs as well.