ASCL at the AAS231 Hack Together Day

The ASCL was well-represented at the AAS 231 Hack Together Day on Friday, January 12, with Advisory Committee Chairman Peter Teuben working on two hacks, one of which hopes to provide better guidance regarding software to reviewers, dashboard developer PW Ryan also working on two hacks, both related to the ASCL and research we’re conducting, and yours truly; I mostly worked on ASCL tasks that have been backlogged, such as adding preferred citation information to ASCL entries. The ASCL currently has preferred citation information listed for 25% of our entries; we will be adding this information to more records in 2018 where we can find it, though I note that many code sites do not list a preferred citation on their download sites.

For one of his hacks, Ryan grabbed all the Github links in ASCL entries, and then using a Ruby Gem that looks for licenses in Github repos, reported on the licensing information available. These results are preliminary, so please don’t take them as gospel, but it appears that a whopping 34% of these codes do not have licensing information in the repo. The most popular license is MIT, which does not surprise me, as Daniel Foreman-Mackey reported in the Special Session we held at AAS 225 that MIT was the popular license across all Github repos that have licensing info.

Report on the Astronomy Software Publishing Special Session at AAS231

On Thursday, January 11, the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) and Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute organized a Special Session at the 231st AAS meeting in National Harbor, MD on Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services, the sixth in a series of software-focused sessions that the ASCL, sometimes with others, has organized at AAS meetings.

"Really glad to see software article publication and citation getting attention at the #AAS231 meeting. Great articles like Daniel Foreman-Mackey's "emcee: The MCMC Hammer in PASP is a perfect example of a highly-referenced software article."Peter Teuben from the University of Maryland and chair of the ASCL’s Advisory Committee) opened the session with a few words about the use of software in research articles. He outlined the layout of the session. A talk by Matteo Cantiello set the scene on how we have reached the point where we are now. Four presentations by representatives from different journals presented their policies on software publication followed Cantiello’s talk, and they were followed by presentations by representatives of others with roles in publishing software: the software author, the data editor, the ADS and the ASCL. The floor was then opened for discussion and Q&A. Teuben moderated the discussion, and at the end of it, turned the podium over to Robert Nemiroff from Michigan Technological University, and a founder of the ASCL, for a summary and closing remarks.

Presentations
Some of the main points from each presentation are summarized below; the titles of each are links to the slides used by the presenters.

  • The Evolution of Software Publication in Astronomy, Matteo Cantiello (Flatiron Institute)
    Cantiello states that the complexity of astrophysics requires computationally intensive models, making astronomy a digital science, and that astronomers have a rich computational environment available, allowing them to easily version, share, and deploy astronomy software. Reproducibility paradoxDespite this, software is often not shared, resulting in a reproducibility paradox: astronomers use computation to provide precise, accurate results, but research has become less transparent with the increase in the use of computational methods. Adding external links to papers to link to software is not a reliable solution to software sharing because of link rot. Formats have changed very little in the last 400 years; despite progress both technologically and socially, the format of papers is still largely the same. He stated that astronomy now has an opportunity to rethink scientific papers as research repositories, with executable objects containing narrative, figures, data, and code.
  • Software papers and citation in the AAS Journals, Chris Lintott (AAS Journals)
    The AAS journals policy on software until recently was set in 1964, which stated that the “need for communication between astronomers interested in computation is already supplied by associations of users of automated computing machines.” The AAS journals changed their policies at the beginning of 2016, and recognized that if novel code is important to published research then it is likely appropriate to describe it in such a paper. Papers can be short, descriptive, and need not include research resultsAAS journals are interested in disclosing software in a form that is currently recognized: the research article, so now allow short papers on code that can be short, descriptive, and do not need to include scientific results. AAS formally recommends open source licensing but does not require it. AAS journals ask people to cite the software paper, as this is the currency the field cares about and also ask people to cite the code. In addition, they request people use the \software{} tag to create a software section in a paper; this is similar to the \facilities{} tag already in use. AAS Publishing continues to think about how to improve, and are introducing the concept of ‘living’ papers, which can be updated with new sections and expanded author lists, so software authors don’t need to publish a new paper to give credit to software authors who have contributed to a new version of the software. Lintott encouraged those interested in living papers to contact him.
  • Software policies and guidelines at Nature, Leslie J. Sage (Nature)
    First, Sage explained the context in which Nature‘s policy is created: Nature is driven by biologists, who live in a very different world from astronomers. Unlike astronomers, biologists live in Windows world. Right now, two journals, Nature Methods and Nature Biotech, require code to be made available, and there are ongoing discussions about whether Nature should do this for other journals. There are formidable problems because of the issue of very specialized code, for example, code that is optimized to compile on a particular Beowulf cluster that may not compile anywhere else. There will be a call for public comment, and Sage hopes astronomers will provide input that is useful for astronomers within that context. Sage raised a number of points that warrant public discussion, such as a preference voiced by some to see detailed descriptions of the algorithms used rather than having the scripts published. Another point to consider for input is that though a lot of software has been made publicly available, all software is written with certain constraints and boundary conditions; some people not aware of these constraints and conditions may drive the software beyond those limits; this raises the question as to whether the results are physically meaningful.
  • SpringerNature data and software policies for astrophysics journals, Ramon Khanna (Springer)
    Springer is encouraging authors to take care of transparency and reproducibility of their results presented in articles, allowing them to append relevant information on source code or the full code in an appendix of the paper; authors can also append the full code, or use other methods to provide this information, such as alternative repositories (e.g., CDS, ASCL, Figshare), and making this information available. They would like the full data and code available. Khanna acknowledged some challenges, including that authors are often not willing to share their software and/or data, editors are often not willing or at least not determined enough to execute policy, and citation standards are unclear. One of the questions is how to execute this policy in the face of unwillingness from authors, editors, reviewers, etc.Questions arise as to how software can be peer reviewed; this would require standards for documentation,  presenting how the results were obtained, making data and software available, and for reviewing the source code itself. How can referees handle this effort? Khanna pointed out that in a field as advanced as astronomy is, and already having some standards and domain resources such as archives, it’s not so much the publisher that should drive new standards, but the community itself.
  • Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design and first-year review, Arfon M. Smith (STScI/JOSS)
    Smith stated that he created JOSS accidentally, from frustration about the overhead of publishing papers about software, and acknowledged that software papers are a hack of the current system to provide a citable, creditable research object for software.  JOSS (http://joss.theoj.org/) seeks to improve the quality of software; its peer review process is almost entirely about the software that’s submitted, and includes making sure the documentation is sufficiently fleshed out, that the package includes automated tests, and that the software has an open source license so can be reused. Smith said it should take about an hour to write a one-page paper for JOSS for those with a well set up repository for their code. The reviews are public on Github and accepted submissions appear on the JOSS site, which has published 200 papers online.
  • Lessons Learned through the Development and Publication of AstroImageJ, Karen Collins (Center for Astrophysics)
    Collins discussed her experience with publishing her software AstroImageJ, a data reduction and image display interface with analysis capabilities specialized for time series differential photometry. She developed the code over several years to support her research. She initially had no intention of releasing the code to the public, but her collaborators saw her plots and graphs and asked to use the software, which was posted to the university’s website to give team members access to it. AstroImageJ lessons learnedShe found her fellow KELT-FUN team members were an excellent focus group; they provided great feedback on the software before it was published, enabling her to add useful features to the software. Results using AstroImageJ started appearing in journals; she registered the software with the ASCL to give it a citable reference, and as usage (and support tasks) grew, she and others working on the code decided to submit a paper to the Astronomical Journal (AJ) to provide good exposure to the potential userbase for the software. This resulted in about 4K downloads of the software in the first year, and the paper is listed 4th on AJ’s most read list. Among the lessons learned in publishing AstroImageJ are to specify how your code is licensed and how it should be cited, make the source code easily accessible, and provide easy way to install and update the software.
  • The roles of the AAS Journals’ Data Editors, August Muench (AAS Journals)
    Muench covered the data editors’ workflow for all submitted manuscripts. A quick review of 60%-90% of all submitted manuscripts is performed, with scripts run on the manuscripts to identify references to code by looking for such things as Github repositories to see whether  their citations need to be reviewed. The editors make notes on the software, data, and figures for review by a scientific editor or the author with recommendations for improving citations for these research artifacts. A subset of accepted articles, 15-20%, undergo a more rigorous post-acceptance data review; this includes a review of tabular data, figures, and interactive elements in addition to software. If necessary, the data editors request that authors acquire DOIs or get preferred citati"People recognize software via plots (and other fingerprints). Make sure you cite the code. I still recognize plots made with PAW."ons for the software used in the research. Muench mentioned that he uses ten keywords in his scripts to identify software, and ends up with a surprising number of articles that do not mention code at all. He stated that part of a data editor’s role to improve software and data citation is educating authors.
  • The role of the ADS in software discovery and citation, Alberto Accomazzi (NASA Astrophysics Data System)
    Accomazzi described what ADS does to promote software discovery and citation, but first he shared ADS’s traditional core responsibilities: to discover content, typically science papers, related to astronomy. Some years ago, the capability to track citations was introduced. As the expectations of community have evolved, so have ADS’s policies, moving from ingesting records about scientific papers to records about scholarly works, including data catalogs, observing proposals, and other artifacts such as software. They have also evolved from tracking citations to articles to citations to tracking citations to scholarly content. How ADS awards citationsADS has an interest in enabling linking so users can easily and uniquely identify the software that was used. Accomazzi covered how ADS ingestion works; for content to be considered for inclusion in ADS, it must be scholarly, related to astronomy, and published formally — not just on a website, but following an explicit editorial process. He also discussed how citations are tracked and what ADS needs to count a citation, going through several examples of what does and does not work for citation. The bottom line for software is to cite it by using a formal citation and a unique identifier; a URL to a website or a DOI in a footnote are not captured as citations. ASCL, JOSS, and Zenodo are ways software can get a persistent identifier to use in a formal citation, and these citations can be tracked by ADS. Accomazzi also discussed how software may have several records in ADS, and that in the future, these records will be crosslinked, as will different versions of a software package so that eventually, ADS can provide cumulative metrics for all different versions of that software product, and like all citation data, this information will become publicly available through an API.
  • The Astrophysics Source Code Library: Supporting software publication and citation, Alice Allen (ASCL/UMD)
    Allen gave a brief overview of what the ASCL is, and stated that though entries in this citable online registry usually point to a software package’s download it, the ASCL can and does serve as a repository for those authors who want to deposit an archive file for their code. The ASCL assigns a DOI to software that it stores. She covered the three main reasons the ASCL exists: to make research more transparent, to improve communication about research computations, and to disseminate software of utility to others. Allen acknowledged that though there is software that might be useful to astronomy, the ASCL focuses on that which has been used in refereed research or submitted for refereeing, this to support the research record. ASCL editors take an active approach in looking for software in research papers and registering them; authors are encouraged to submit their own software, too, and submission by author increased 23% in 2017 over 2016. The ASCL supports software publication and citation in a number of ways, including providing a citation avenue for software and listing preferred citation information in ASCL entries. The ASCL has been online since 1999; it supports the Force11 software citation principles and was a party to  developing them. It was also party to a Dagstuhl Manifesto, another cross-disciplinary effort  that focused on steps members of a research community can take on their own. Among these steps is citing software properly — in a trackable way — and when reviewing a paper, ensuring that it cites the software used in the research.

Discussion
After the presentations, Teuben commented that he thought journals could do a better job in instructing referees about software, to identify when code is involved in research and insist on citations to it. He hoped the discussion would touch on this, and then opened the floor to all. People interested in software sustainability might want to follow @si2urssi (urssi.us) which is working to plan a US research software systainability institute - a first workshop will likely be in AprilDiscussion was lively and may be covered in more depth in a future post, but some of the major points were:

  • There’s still fear about releasing software, still resistance to doing so
  • Science is all about reproducibility; it’s not science if it’s not reproducible
  • Who should push for greater openness is an open question, with some wanting journals to do this, and others feeling it’s up to the astronomy community — us! — to enforce the standards we want
  • Astronomers are often not trained in software engineering techniques; greater education in this area would be helpful

"If software developers were well funded, ie would be easier to get people to share their code."

Teuben brought the discussion to an end and turned the floor over to Robert Nemiroff (Michigan Technological University), who briefly summarized the presentations and discussion and closed the session.

My thanks to David W. Hogg and Peter Teuben for work on developing the session, to Peter for his excellent moderating, to Robert for closing the session, and for PW Ryan for serving as scribe. My thanks to Matteo, Chris, Leslie, Ramon, Arfon, Karen, Gus, and Alberto for their excellent presentations and participation, to the Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute for partnering with the ASCL, and to the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, the University of Maryland College Park, and Michigan Technological University for supporting the ASCL.

Slides from Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services

THURSDAY, 11 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services
10:00 am – 11:30 am
National Harbor 2

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) and Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute organized a Special Session at the 231st AAS meeting in National Harbor, MD on Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services. Click on a talk’s title to download its slides.


Matteo Cantiello (Flatiron Institute), The Evolution of Software Publication in Astronomy
Chris Lintott (AAS Journals), Software papers and citation in the AAS Journals
Leslie J. Sage (Nature), Software policies and guidelines at Nature
Ramon Khanna (Springer), SpringerNature data and software policies for astrophysics journals
Arfon M. Smith (STScI/JOSS), Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design and first-year review
Karen Collins (Center for Astrophysics), Lessons Learned through the Development and Publication of AstroImageJ
August Muench (AAS Journals), The roles of the AAS Journals’ Data Editors
Alberto Accomazzi (NASA Astrophysics Data System), The role of the ADS in software discovery and citation
Alice Allen (ASCL/UMD), The Astrophysics Source Code Library: Supporting software publication and citation

ASCL research poster as AAS 231

Poster for Schroedinger's Code research paper showing results
Astronomers use software for their research, but how many of the codes they use are available as source code? We examined a sample of 166 papers from 2015 for clearly identified software use, then searched for source code for the software packages mentioned in these research papers. We categorized the software to indicate whether source code is available for download and whether there are restrictions to accessing it, and if source code was not available, whether some other form of the software, such as a binary, was. Over 40% of the source code for the software used in our sample was not available for download.

As URLs have often been used as proxy citations for software, we also extracted URLs from one journal’s 2015 research articles, removed those from certain long-term, reliable domains, and tested the remainder to determine what percentage of these URLs were still accessible in September and October, 2017.

P. Wesley Ryan, Astrophysics Source Code Library
Alice Allen, Astrophysics Source Code Library/University of Maryland
Peter Teuben, University of Maryland

Download poster
Download article pre-print

ASCL poster at AAS 231

ASCL poster showing various statistics for ASCL, including increase in citations and growth of resource
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) was founded in 1999 by Robert Nemiroff and John Wallin. ASCL editors seek both new and old peer-reviewed papers that describe methods or experiments that involve the development or use of source code, and add entries for the found codes to the library. Software authors can submit their codes to the ASCL as well. This ensures a comprehensive listing covering a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used in peer-reviewed studies. The ASCL is indexed by both NASA’s Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science, making software used in research more discoverable. This presentation covers the growth in the ASCL’s number of entries, the number of citations to its entries, and in which journals those citations appear.

Alice Allen, Astrophysics Source Code Library/University of Maryland
G. Bruce Berriman, Caltech/IPAC-NExScI
Kimberly DuPrie, Space Telescope Science Institute/Astrophysics Source Code Library
Jessica Mink, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Robert Nemiroff, Michigan Technological University
P.W. Ryan, Astrophysics Source Code Library
Judy Schmidt, Astrophysics Source Code Library
Lior Shamir, Lawrence Technological University
Keith Shortridge, Knave and Varlet
Peter Teuben, University of Maryland
John Wallin, Middle Tennessee State University
Rein H. Warmels, European Southern Observatory

Download poster

ASCL at AAS 231

It’s AAS meeting time, and that means a busy busy week! There are some of the ASCL’s activities at this meeting; we hope to see you at our posters and in the Special Session!


Poster 150.10: The Astrophysics Source Code Library by the numbers
Tuesday, January 09, Prince Georges Exhibit Hall

Abstract: The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) was founded in 1999 by Robert Nemiroff and John Wallin. ASCL editors seek both new and old peer-reviewed papers that describe methods or experiments that involve the development or use of source code, and add entries for the found codes to the library. Software authors can submit their codes to the ASCL as well. This ensures a comprehensive listing covering a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used in peer-reviewed studies. The ASCL is indexed by both NASA’s Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and Web of Science, making software used in research more discoverable. This presentation covers the growth in the ASCL’s number of entries, the number of citations to its entries, and in which journals those citations appear. It also discusses what changes have been made to the ASCL recently, and what its plans are for the future.


Poster 150.28: Schroedinger’s code: Source code availability and transparency in astrophysics
Tuesday, January 09, Prince Georges Exhibit Hall

Abstract: Astronomers use software for their research, but how many of the codes they use are available as source code? We examined a sample of 166 papers from 2015 for clearly identified software use, then searched for source code for the software packages mentioned in these research papers. We categorized the software to indicate whether source code is available for download and whether there are restrictions to accessing it, and if source code was not available, whether some other form of the software, such as a binary, was. Over 40% of the source code for the software used in our sample was not available for download.

As URLs have often been used as proxy citations for software, we also extracted URLs from one journal’s 2015 research articles, removed those from certain long-term, reliable domains, and tested the remainder to determine what percentage of these URLs were still accessible in September and October, 2017.


Special Session: Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services
Thursday, January 11, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM; National Harbor 2
Organizers: Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL)/Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute

The importance of software to astronomy research is well-established, and excellent arguments to reveal these computational methods to support the research record have been advanced and much discussed in recent years. But what avenues are open to software authors to publish their codes, and what roles and services exist in the community to support their efforts? This session, organized by the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) and Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute, answers that question. It builds on previous AAS special sessions and brings together a panel of experts to present on the various avenues for publishing codes and the pros and cons of these avenues, the roles of authors, data editors, and publication indexers in software publication, the benefits of publication to authors and the discipline, and efforts of related community projects to improve aspects of software publication. After the presentations, the floor will be open for discussion and questions.

The topics and panelists are:

Introductory remarks, Peter Teuben (University of Maryland)
The evolution of software publication in astronomy, Matteo Cantiello (Flatiron Institute, Center for Computational Astrophysics/Princeton University)
Software papers and citation in the AAS journals, Chris Lintott (AAS Journals/University of Oxford)
Software policies and guidelines at Nature, Leslie J. Sage (Physical Sciences, Nature)
SpringerNature data and software policies for astrophysics journals, Ramon Khanna (Astronomy, Springer)
Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): design and first-year review, Arfon M. Smith (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Lessons learned through the development and publication of AstroImageJ, Karen Collins (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
The roles of the AAS Journals’ Data Editors, August Muench (Journals Division, AAS)
The role of the ADS in software discovery and citation, Alberto Accomazzi (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory)
The Astrophysics Source Code Library: Supporting software publication and citation, Alice Allen (ASCL/University of Maryland)
Open discussion and Q&A, Moderated by Peter Teuben (University of Maryland)
Summary and closing remarks, Robert J. Nemiroff (Michigan Technological University)

Vermeer in DC, just in time for the AAS 231st meeting!

If you are going to the AAS meeting in National Harbor next month, you might consider taking some time to visit the National Gallery of Art for a rare opportunity to view two paintings well-known to Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) fans: Vermeer’s luminous The Astronomer and The Geographer. These paintings, owned by the Louvre and the Städelsches Kunstinstitut respectively, are part of the wonderful Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry exhibit which runs through January 21, 2018 in the West building of the Gallery.

Why are these two paintings well-known to APOD fans? A mashup of these two paintings appeared on APOD’s first birthday on June 16, 1996; note the introduction of a Hubble image for the painting on the wall:

picture combining Vermeer's The Geographer and The Astronomer paintings into one image, with Hubble's Pillars of Creation appearing on the back wall

APOD for June 16, 1996 (with apologies to Vermeer)

On APOD’s 5th birthday, a new composite of these paintings appeared:

picture combining Vermeer's The Geographer and The Astronomer paintings into one image

APOD for June 16, 2000 (with apologies to Vermeer)

Apparently, a tradition was born, and APOD fans started contributing their own takes on these famous images, as seen below in the 10th birthday image, created by Richard Taillet (Univ. de Savoie, LAPTH, LPNHE) and including a few objects that Vermeer’s astronomer never had the opportunity to view.

APOD for June 16, 2006 (with apologies to Vermeer; composite by Richard Taillet)

The next landmark APOD birthdays featured the image that appeared for the 10th birthday, but with a twist: it was pixelated by APOD fan Rob Stevenson using APOD thumbnail images. The image below does not do this justice, so please click through to the larger image housed on the APOD site to see whether you can find your favorite APOD amongst the ones making up this image.

APOD for June 16, 2016 (with apologies to Vermeer; pixelation by Rob Peterson)

To get back to the art exhibit, Vermeer is not the only painter featured in Genre Painting show, nor is his the only astronomer there. The Geographer and The Astronomer appear on one wall with Gerrit Dou’s Astronomer by Candlelight, owned by the Getty Museum, between them. Paintings by other Dutch artists, including Gerard ter Borch, Caspar NetscherPieter de Hooch, and Jan Steen, are also on display. So many Dutch treats! It’s a lovely exhibit and well worth finding your way to the National Gallery.

You will not have to go to the National Gallery of Art to see the APOD editors, however! Jerry Bonnell and Robert Nemiroff are giving a public talk at the AAS meeting at National Harbor; The Year’s Best Astronomy Images will be held on Tuesday, January 9 starting at 7:00 pm in the Gaylord’s Maryland Ballroom D.

Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services Special Session at AAS 231

THURSDAY, 11 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services
10:00 am – 11:30 am
National Harbor 2

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) and Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute have organized a Special Session at January’s AAS meeting. The session, Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services, will be moderated by Peter Teuben (University of Maryland).

The importance of software to astronomy research is well-established, and excellent arguments to reveal these computational methods to support the research record have been advanced and much discussed in recent years. But what avenues are open to software authors to publish their codes, and what roles and services exist in the community to support their efforts? This session answers these questions. It builds on previous AAS special sessions and brings together a panel of experts to present various avenues for publishing codes and the pros and cons of these avenues, the roles of authors, data editors, and publication indexers in software publication, the benefits of publication to authors and the discipline, and efforts of related community projects to improve aspects of software publication. After the presentations, the floor will be open for discussion and questions. The presenters and topics covered are:

Matteo Cantiello (Flatiron Institute), The Evolution of Software Publication in Astronomy
Chris Lintott (AAS Journals), Software papers and citation in the AAS Journals
Leslie J. Sage (Nature), Software policies and guidelines at Nature
Ramon Khanna (Springer), SpringerNature data and software policies for astrophysics journals
Arfon M. Smith (STScI/JOSS), Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design and first-year review
Karen Collins (Center for Astrophysics), Lessons Learned through the Development and Publication of AstroImageJ
August Muench (AAS Journals), The roles of the AAS Journals’ Data Editors
Alberto Accomazzi (NASA Astrophysics Data System), The role of the ADS in software discovery and citation
Alice Allen (ASCL/UMD), The Astrophysics Source Code Library: Supporting software publication and citation

And you, astro software authors and users, are as always important participants in the discussion. Please come with your questions, observations, and comments; I hope to see you there!

Software events at AAS 231, National Harbor

The Big List o’ Software Stuff for the January AAS meeting is here; it appears software is taking over the world! if I missed anything, please let me know in the comments below. Thank you!


SUNDAY, 7 JANUARY 2018
Workshops
Introduction to Software Carpentry (Day 1), 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM; RiverView Ballroom 2
Hands-on Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling of Cosmic Populations, 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM; Potomac Ballroom 1
Using Python to Search NASA’s Astrophysics Archives, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM; Potomac Ballroom 2


MONDAY, 8 JANUARY 2018
Workshops
Introduction to Software Carpentry (Day 2), 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM; RiverView Ballroom 2
Using Python and Astropy for Astronomical Data Analysis, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM; RiverView Ballroom B
A Data Science Foundation & Roadmap for Astronomy Instructors, 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM; Potomac Ballroom 1


TUESDAY, 9 JANUARY 2018
Splinter meeting: Better Data Visualization and Exploration with GLUE, 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM; National Harbor 8 (Note corrected time!)

Poster presentations

Session 150. Computation, Data Handling, Image Analysis Poster Session (39 posters!)

Also:
157.02. Evolving R Coronae Borealis Stars with MESA
157.07. Modeling Protoplanetary Disks to Characterize the Evolution of their Structure
157.15. Case Study of Data Mining in Observational Astronomy: The Search for New OB Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud
144.12. The evolution of a dead zone in a circumplanetary disk
144.17. Modeling a Large Heterogeneous Set of CIRS Spectra of Titan: The ν4 band of 12C2HD
111.02. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System
111.03. Phase Curve Analysis of Super-Earth 55 Cancri e
111.04. Statistical Analysis of Hubble/WFC3 Transit Spectroscopy of Extrasolar Planets
111.08. Theory and Simulation of Exoplanetary Atmospheric Haze: Giant Spectral Line Broadening
102.02. The Pan-STARRS pipeline and data products
102.03. Precision Photometry and Astrometry from Pan-STARRS
110.01. Resolving the Circumgalactic Medium in the NEPHTHYS Simulations
115.09. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Deep Impact Mission into Comet Tempel 1
151.04. A Transdimensional Approach to Modeling the Cosmic X-ray Background
151.05. The VLITE Post-Processing Pipeline
151.07. OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission Image Analysis
147.03. Impact of Fragtal Grains on Protoplanetary Disk Evolution
147.05. Determining Disk Parameters for the Classical Be Star 59 Cyg
147.06. Modeling Protoplanetary Disks
147.09. Characterizing Protoplanetary Disks in a Young Binary in Orion
147.14. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Protoplanetary Disks with GIZMO
153.06. A Search for Cosmic String Loops Using GADGET-2 Cosmological N-Body Simulator
148.04. 3D hydrodynamic simulations of tidal disruption of terrestrial planets around white dwarfs
148.08. BARTTest: Community-Standard Atmospheric Radiative-Transfer and Retrieval Tests
148.13. Modeled 3-D Biosignatures from the Stratospheres of Proxima Centauri b and M-dwarf Planets
148.14. The Exoplanet Characterization ToolKit (ExoCTK)
148.29. Every Cloud has a Silver Lining: Synthesizing Spectra for Exoplanets with Inhomogeneous Aerosol Coverage
149.22. HERA, Methods of Computational Optimization in search for Epoch of Reionization
149.31. A Phenomenological Model of Star Formation Efficiency in Dark Matter Halos
136.02. Simulations of star-forming molecular clouds: observational predictions
158.10. Simulations of Tidally Driven Formation of Binary Planet Systems
158.11. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence in Cool, Low-Mass Stars: Toward Linking Dynamo Action with Starspots
158.16. The Ultracool Typing Kit – An Open-Source, Qualitative Spectral Typing GUI for L Dwarfs
146.01. Binary Model for the Heartbeat Star System KIC 4142768
145.05. Modeling and Analysis of CTIO 1.5m White Dwarf Spectra

Oral presentations

111.02. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System, 10:10 AM – 10:20 AM, National Harbor 11
111.03. Phase Curve Analysis of Super-Earth 55 Cancri e, 10:20 AM – 10:30 AM, National Harbor 11
111.04. Statistical Analysis of Hubble/WFC3 Transit Spectroscopy of Extrasolar Planets, 10:30 AM – 10:40 AM, National Harbor 11
111.08. Theory and Simulation of Exoplanetary Atmospheric Haze: Giant Spectral Line Broadening, 11:20 AM – 11:30 AM, National Harbor 11
102.02. The Pan-STARRS pipeline and data products, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM, Potomac C
102.03. Precision Photometry and Astrometry from Pan-STARRS, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM, Potomac C
110.01. Resolving the Circumgalactic Medium in the NEPHTHYS Simulations, 10:00 AM – 10:10 AM, National Harbor 10
115.06. The Deflector Selector: A Machine Learning Framework for Prioritizing Hazardous Object Deflection Technology Development, 10:50 AM – 11:00 AM, Potomac 1-2
115.09. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Deep Impact Mission into Comet Tempel 1, 1:20 AM – 11:30 AM, Potomac 1-2
116.01. SVD/MCMC Data Analysis Pipeline for Global Redshifted 21-cm Spectrum Observations of the Cosmic Dawn and Dark Ages, 12:00 PM – 3:30 PM; Woodrow Wilson BCD
128.04. Dynamics as a ‘Red Flag’ in Exoplanetary Science, 2:40 PM – 2:50 PM, National Harbor 11
132.07. Time-Dependent Electron Acceleration in Pulsar Wind Termination Shocks: Application the 2011 April Crab Nebula Gamma-ray Flare, 3:20 PM – 3:30 PM, Potomac 3-4


WEDNESDAY, 10 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Applied Statistical Methods in Astronomy: Gaussian Processes and Machine Learning
2:00 PM – 3:30 PM; National Harbor 2

Poster presentations
Session 239: Applied Statistical Methods in Astronomy: Gaussian Processes and Machine Learning Poster Session

Also:
257.09. Exploring the Internal Dynamics of Globular Clusters
257.11. GalMod: the last frontier of Galaxy population synthesis models
257.22. TYCHO: Simulating Exoplanets Within Stellar Clusters
244.09. The COBAIN (COntact Binary Atmospheres with INterpolation) Code for Radiative Transfer
244.22. Modeling the binary circumstellar medium of Type IIb/L/n supernova progenitors
244.23. Photometric Analysis and Modeling of Five Mass-Transferring Binary Systems
244.26. A Global Three-Dimensional Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulation of a Self-Gravitating Accretion Disk
238.05. The Chandra Source Catalog 2.0: Data Processing Pipelines
246.03. An accessible echelle pipeline and its application to a binary star
246.04. Building Better Planet Populations for EXOSIMS
246.16. Improvements to the Root Finding Algorithm in VBBinaryLensing
258.16. Epoch of Reionization : An Investigation of the Semi-Analytic 21CMMC Code
252.12. Using numerical simulations to study the ICM metallicity fields in clusters and groups
255.01. SkyPlotter: Displaying Source Candidates Near High-Energy Neutrino Events
255.02. A new relativistic model for tidal stream evolution during tidal disruption events
255.05. Modeling Ponderomotive Squeezed Light in Gravitational-Wave Laser Interferometers
255.17. Data Analysis Techniques for LIGO Detector Characterization
243.11. Applying a physical continuum model to describe the broadband X-ray spectra of accreting pulsars at high luminosity
237.03. New Algorithm Identifies Tidal Streams Oriented Along our Line-of-Sight

Oral presentations
Session 213: Computation, Data Science, and Image Analysis 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM; National Harbor 4 (7 presentations)

Also:
211.07. Bayesian Analysis of Hot Jupiter Radius Anomalies Points to Ohmic Dissipation, 11:10 AM – 11:20 AM, National Harbor 11
210.06. Figuring Out Gas in Galaxies In Enzo (FOGGIE): Resolving the Inner Circumgalactic Medium, 11:10 AM – 11:20 AM, National Harbor 10
229.03. Forward modelling techniques for spectra retrieval of circumstellar debris disks, 2:30 PM – 2:40 PM, Potomac 5-6
226.03. Cosmological Simulations with Molecular Astrochemistry: Water in the Early Universe, 2:30 PM – 2:40 PM, National Harbor 3
228.05. pyLIMA : The first open source microlensing modeling software, 2:50 PM – 3:00 PM, National Harbor 11


THURSDAY, 11 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, National Harbor 2
Plenary Talk: Astro Data Science: The Next Generation, 11:40 AM – 12:30 PM; Potomac Ballroom AB

Poster presentations
350.01. Looking for Dust-Scattering Light Echoes
350.03. Studying Dust Scattering Halos with Galactic X-ray Binaries
350.05. Markov Chain Models for Stochastic Behavior in Resonance Overlap Regions
340.13. Simulating Supernovae Driven Outflows in Dwarf Galaxies
355.27. Stellar Atmospheric Modelling for the ACCESS Program
351.02. Calculating the n-point correlation function with general and efficient python code
348.12. A Comparison of Mixing in Stellar Evolution Codes Tycho and Geneva
362.08. What Time is Your Sunset? Accounting for Refraction in Sunrise/set Prediction Models
362.09. SpecTracer: A Python-Based Interactive Solution for Echelle Spectra Reduction
362.11. Generative Models in Deep Learning: Constraints for Galaxy Evolution
362.16. Statistical tools for analysis and modeling of cosmic populations and astronomical time series: CUDAHM and TSE
338.04. Simulating nanostorm heating in coronal loops using hydrodynamics and non-thermal particle evolution
338.06. Modeling Solar Atmospheric Phenomena with AtomDB and PyAtomDB

Oral presentations
334.01. Modeling the photo-polarimetric characteristics of brown dwarfs, 2:00 PM – 2:10 PM, Maryland 1-2
334.04. 3D Realistic Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Moderate-Mass Star: Effects of Rotation, 2:40 PM – 2:50 PM, Maryland 1-2


FRIDAY, 12 JANUARY 2018
Workshop: Hack Together Day, 10:00 am ‐ 7:00 pm, National Harbor 13 (Info and registration)

Special Session: Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy (ASTRO): SAMSI 2016-17, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, Grapevine 2

Poster presentations
434.08. Modeling the Effects of Asynchronous Rotation on Secondary Eclipse Timings in HW VIr Binaries
436.05. Real-time Automatic Search for Multi-wavelength Counterparts of DWF Transient
436.16. CosmoQuest Transient Tracker: Opensource Photometry & Astrometry software
437.04. Impact of Ice on Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks and Formation of Planetary Systems
438.02. Tests of Catastrophic Outlier Prediction in Empirical Photometric Redshift Estimation with Redshift Probability Distributions
438.04. Confronting Alternative Cosmological Models with the Highest-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae
439.09. TESS Data Processing and Quick-look Pipeline
439.10. PyKE3: data analysis tools for NASA’s Kepler, K2, and TESS missions
439.18. Open-source Software for Exoplanet Atmospheric Modeling
439.22. Gaussian Process Noise Modeling with RadVel: a Case Study of HD 3167
439.23. Developing Tighter Constraints on Exoplanet Biosignatures by Modeling Atmospheric Haze
440.12. The Effects of Accretion Disk Thickness on the Black Hole Reflection Spectrum
441.03. Large Scale Structure in CHILES using DisPerSE
444.13. Teaching Astronomy and Computation with Gaia: A New Curriculum for an Extra-curricular High School Program
447.12. The Data Calibration Pipeline for JWST/NIRSpec
448.02. Kinematics of Globular Cluster: new Perspectives of Energy Equipartition from N-body Simulations
448.05. Improved Membership Probability for Moving Groups: Bayesian and Machine Learning Approaches
449.10. Employing Machine-Learning Methods to Study Young Stellar Objects
453.09. PINT, A Modern Software Package for Pulsar Timing
428.03. Identifying Likely Disk-hosting M dwarfs with Disk Detective
426.07. Observing Galaxy Mergers in Simulations
426.08. A new 3-D View of Ionized Gas Conditions in Galaxies
424.01. Constraining Population Synthesis Models of Compact Binary Mergers using Supernova Observations

Oral presentations
405.04. Radiation Transport in Dynamic Spacetimes, 10:40 AM – 10:50 AM, Maryland C
412.02.D Illuminating the star clusters and satellite galaxies with multi-scale baryonic simulations, 10:10 AM – 10:30 AM, National Harbor 4
406.01. Phase-space Analysis in the Group and Cluster Environment: Introduction and Application, 10:00 AM – 10:10 AM, Maryland D
406.05. Gas Dynamics in the Fornax Cluster: Viscosity, turbulence, and sloshing, 11:00 AM – 11:10 AM, Maryland D
409.04D. A Modern Picture of Barred Galaxy Dynamics, 10:40 AM – 11:00 AM, National Harbor 10
408.03D. Multidimensional pair-instability supernova simulations and their multi-messenger signals, 10:20 AM – 10:40 AM, National Harbor 3

Also of likely interest is the oral presentation on “Big Data” Teen Astronomy Cafes at NOAO that will take place on Wednesday, 10 January from 10:10 AM – 10:20 AM in Maryland 1-2.

 

November additions to the ASCL

Twenty-three codes were added in November 2017:

BayesVP: Full Bayesian Voigt profile fitting
Bifrost: Stream processing framework for high-throughput applications
clustep: Initial conditions for galaxy cluster halo simulations
correlcalc: Two-point correlation function from redshift surveys
FATS: Feature Analysis for Time Series

FTbg: Background removal using Fourier Transform
galkin: Milky Way rotation curve data handler
galstep: Initial conditions for spiral galaxy simulations
galstreams: Milky Way streams footprint library and toolkit
Gammapy: Python toolbox for gamma-ray astronomy

HBT: Hierarchical Bound-Tracing
HBT+: Subhalo finder and merger tree builder
HO-CHUNK: Radiation Transfer code
inhomog: Raychaudhuri integration
LExTeS: Link Extraction and Testing Suite

Lightning: SED Fitting Package
MARXS: Multi-Architecture Raytrace Xray mission Simulator
megaman: Manifold Learning for Millions of Points
rac-2d: Thermo-chemical for modeling water vapor formation in protoplanetary disks
RGW: Affine-invariant Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling

SpcAudace: Spectroscopic processing and analysis package of Audela software
SPIDERMAN: Fast code to simulate secondary transits and phase curves
Thindisk: Protoplanetary disk toy model