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[submitted] dfitspy: a dfits|fitsort implementation in python

The FITS format (Flexible Image Transport System) is a widely used format to store astronomical data. It is used to store a lot of different types of data such as 1D or 2D spectra, 3D data cubes. It has been developed in the late 1970 to reach its final form almost two decades ago. FITS files are built with two components. The data themselves are stored as tables and contains any types of data. A header is built containing set of keywords-value pairs aiming at describing the data themselves.

Accessing and displaying metadata inside FITS files is important in order to get an overview of their content properties without having to read the data themselves. It is particularly useful when dealing with large amount of files at once. Tools have been already publicly available for years with the dfits and fitsort algorithms (the documentation is available here https://www.eso.org/sci/software/eclipse/eug/eug/node8.html). The main limitation is that they are stand-alone programs useable only in a terminal. They can not be used natively inside another program.

The python module presented here, dfitspy, is a project that migrates the main dfits and fitsort capabilities to python. It is a metadata searcher/displayer for FITS files. As dfits and fitsort, dfitspy is able to display in the terminal the result of a metadata search and is able to grep certain values of keywords inside large samples of files. Therefore it can be used directly with the command line interface. Nevertheless, dfitspy can be, and it is its strength, imported as a python module and the user can use these functionnalities inside another python code or the python interpretor.

[ascl:1903.002] SIXTE: Simulation of X-ray Telescopes

SIXTE simulates X-Ray telescope observation; the software performs instrument performance analyses and produces simulated event files for mission and analysis studies. SIXTE strives to find a compromise between exactness of the simulation and speed. Using calibration files such as the PSF, RMF and ARF makes efficient simulations possible at comparably high speed, even though they include nonlinear effects such as pileup. Setups for some current and future missions, such as XMM-Newton and Athena, are included in the package; others can be added by the user with relatively little effort through specifying the main instrument characteristics in a flexible, human-readable XML-based format. Properties of X-ray sources to be simulated are described in a detector-independent format, i.e., the same input can be used for simulating observations with all available instruments, and the same input can also be used for simulations with the SIMX simulator. The input files are easily generated from standard data such as XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) spectral models or FITS images with tools provided with the SIXTE distribution. The input data scale well from single point sources up to very complicated setups.

[ascl:1903.003] allesfitter: Flexible star and exoplanet inference from photometry and radial velocity

allesfitter provides flexible and robust inference of stars and exoplanets given photometric and radial velocity (RV) data. The software offers a rich selection of orbital and transit models, accommodating multiple exoplanets, multi-star systems, star spots, stellar flares, and various noise models. It features both parameter estimation and model selection. A graphical user interface is used to specify input parameters, and to easily run a nested sampling or Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) fit, producing publication-ready tables, LaTex code, and plots. allesfitter provides an inference framework that unites the versatile packages ellc (ascl:1603.016), aflare (flare model; Davenport et al. 2014), dynesty (ascl:1809.013), emcee (ascl:1303.002) and celerite (ascl:1709.008).

[ascl:1903.004] brutifus: Python module to post-process datacubes from integral field spectrographs

brutifus aids in post-processing datacubes from integral field spectrographs. The set of Python routines in the package handle generic tasks, such as the registration of a datacube WCS solution with the Gaia catalogue, the correction of Galactic reddening, or the subtraction of the nebular/stellar continuum on a spaxel-per-spaxel basis, with as little user interactions as possible. brutifus is modular, in that the order in which the post-processing routines are run is entirely customizable.

[ascl:1903.005] Galmag: Computation of realistic galactic magnetic fields

Galmag computes galactic magnetic fields based on mean field dynamo theory. Written in Python, Galmag allows quick exploration of solutions to the mean field dynamo equation based on galaxy parameters specified by the user, such as the scale height profile and the galaxy rotation curves. The magnetic fields are solenoidal by construction and can be helical.

[ascl:1903.006] SimSpin: Kinematic analysis of galaxy simulations

The R-package SimSpin measures the kinematics of a galaxy simulation as if it had been observed using an IFU. The functions included in the package can produce a kinematic data cube and measure the "observables" from this data cube, specifically the observable spin parameter λr. This package, once installed, is fully documented and tested.

[ascl:1903.007] ICSF: Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

ICSF (Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting) "corrects" (x,y) data in which the ordinate represents the average of a quantity over a finite interval in the abscissa. A typical example is spectral data, where the average intensity over a wavelength bin (the measured quantity) is assigned to the center of the bin. If the profile is curved, the average will be different from the discrete value at the bin center location. ICSF, written in IDL and available separately and as part of SolarSoft (ascl:1208.013), corrects the intensity using an iterative procedure and cubic spline. The corrected intensity equals the "true" intensity at bin center, rather than the average over the bin. Unlike other methods that are restricted to a single fitting function, typically a spline, ICSF can be used with any function, such as a cubic spline or a Gaussian, with slight changes to the code.

[ascl:1903.008] NIFTy5: Numerical Information Field Theory v5

NIFTy (Numerical Information Field Theory) facilitates the construction of Bayesian field reconstruction algorithms for fields being defined over multidimensional domains. A NIFTy algorithm can be developed for 1D field inference and then be used in 2D or 3D, on the sphere, or on product spaces thereof. NIFTy5 is a complete redesign of the previous framework (ascl:1302.013), and requires only the specification of a probabilistic generative model for all involved fields and the data in order to be able to recover the former from the latter. This is achieved via Metric Gaussian Variational Inference, which also provides posterior samples for all unknown quantities jointly.

[ascl:1903.009] PRF: Probabilistic Random Forest

PRF (Probabilistic Random Forest) is a machine learning algorithm for noisy datasets. The PRF is a modification of the long-established Random Forest (RF) algorithm, and takes into account uncertainties in the measurements (i.e., features) as well as in the assigned classes (i.e., labels). To do so, the Probabilistic Random Forest (PRF) algorithm treats the features and labels as probability distribution functions, rather than as deterministic quantities.

[ascl:1903.010] GalIMF: Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function

GalIMF (Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function) computes the galaxy-wide initial stellar mass function by integrating over a whole galaxy, parameterized by star formation rate and metallicity. The generated stellar mass distribution depends on the galaxy-wide star formation rate (SFR, which is related to the total mass of a galalxy) and the galaxy-wide metallicity. The code can generate a galaxy-wide IMF (IGIMF) and can also generate all the stellar masses within a galaxy with optimal sampling (OSGIMF). To compute the IGIMF or the OSGIMF, the GalIMF module contains all local IMF properties (e.g. the dependence of the stellar IMF on the metallicity, on the density of the star-cluster forming molecular cloud cores), and this software module can, therefore, be also used to obtain only the stellar IMF with various prescriptions, or to investigate other features of the stellar population such as what is the most massive star that can be formed in a star cluster.

[ascl:1903.011] AsPy: Aspherical fluctuations on the spherical collapse background

AsPy computes the determinants of aspherical fluctuations on the spherical collapse background. Written in Python, this procedure includes analytic factorization and cancellation of the so-called `IR-divergences'—spurious enhanced contributions that appear in the dipole sector and are associated with large bulk flows.

[ascl:1903.012] DAVE: Discovery And Vetting of K2 Exoplanets

DAVE implements a pipeline to find and vet planets planets using data from NASA's K2 mission. The pipeline contains several modules tailored to particular aspects of the vetting procedures, using photocenter analysis to rule out background eclipsing binaries and flux time-series analysis to rule out odd–even differences, secondary eclipses, low-S/N events, variability other than a transit, and size of the transiting object.

[ascl:1903.013] NFWdist: Density, distribution function, quantile function and random generation for the 3D NFW profile

Available in R and Python, the simple analytic scheme NFWdist performs highly efficient and exact sampling of the Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile as a true probability distribution function, with the only variable being the concentration.

[ascl:1903.014] PLATON: PLanetary Atmospheric Transmission for Observer Noobs

PLATON (PLanetary Atmospheric Transmission for Observer Noobs) calculates transmission spectra for exoplanets and retrieves atmospheric characteristics based on observed spectra; it is based on ExoTransmit (ascl:1611.005). PLATON supports the most common atmospheric parameters, such as temperature, metallicity, C/O ratio, cloud-top pressure, and scattering slope. It also has less commonly included features, such as a Mie scattering cloud model and unocculted starspot corrections.

[ascl:1903.015] SPICE: Observation Geometry System for Space Science Missions

The SPICE (Spacecraft Planet Instrument C-matrix [“Camera matrix”] Events) toolkit offers a set of building blocks for constructing tools supporting multi-mission, international space exploration programs and research in planetary science, heliophysics, Earth science, and for observations from terrestrial observatories. It computes many kinds of observation geometry parameters, including the ephemerides, orientations, sizes, and shapes of planets, satellites, comets and asteroids. It can also compute the orientation of a spacecraft, its various moving structures, and an instrument's field-of-view location on a planet's surface or atmosphere. It can determine when a specified geometric event occurs, such as when an object is in shadow or is in transit across another object. The SPICE toolkit is available in FORTRAN 77, ANSI C, IDL, and MATLAB.

[ascl:1903.016] SpiceyPy: Python wrapper for the NAIF C SPICE Toolkit

SpiceyPy is a Python wrapper for the NAIF C SPICE Toolkit (ascl:1903.015). It is compatible with Python 2 and 3, and was written using ctypes.

[ascl:1903.017] HelioPy: Heliospheric and planetary physics library

HelioPy provides a set of tools to download and read in data, and carry out other common data processing tasks for heliospheric and planetary physics. It handles a wide variety of solar and satellite data and builds upon the SpiceyPy package (ascl:1903.016) to provide an accessible interface for performing orbital calculations. It has also implemented a framework to perform transformations between some common coordinate systems.

[submitted] Variable Star Analysis Library (JVarStar)

The Variable Star Analysis Library (JVarStar) is an open source Java Maven package that represents an accumulation of methods and techniques used in the analysis of variable star data for the purposes of pattern classification. Machine learning techniques, fundamental mathematical methods, and digital signal processing functions are included in this all-in-one package that can be externally referenced (i.e., from Python), or can be used for further Java development. In addition to the developed functionality, this library has dependencies on several open source packages such as: maven, Apache Math Commons, JUnit, JSOFA, etc. The unification of these dependencies along with the developed functionality, provides a developer with an easily accessible library from which to construct stable variable star analysis and classification code.

[ascl:1904.001] sxrbg: ROSAT X-Ray Background Tool

The ROSAT X-Ray Background Tool (sxrbg) calculates the average X-ray background count rate and statistical uncertainty in each of the six standard bands of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) diffuse background maps (R1, R2, R4, R5, R6, R7) for a specified astronomical position and a search region consisting of either a circle with a specified radius or an annulus with specified inner and outer radii centered on the position. The values returned by the tool are in units of 10^-6 counts/second/arcminute^2. sxrbg can also create a count-rate-based spectrum file which can be used with XSpec (ascl:9910.005) to calculate fluxes and offers support for counts statistics (cstat), an alternative method for generating a background spectrum. HEASoft (ascl:1408.004) is a prerequisite for building. The code is in the public domain.

[ascl:1904.002] GALAXY: N-body simulation software for isolated, collisionless stellar systems

GALAXY evolves (almost) isolated, collisionless stellar systems, both disk-like and ellipsoidal. In addition to the N-body code galaxy, which offers eleven different methods to compute the gravitational accelerations, the package also includes sophisticated set-up and analysis software. While not as versatile as tree codes, for certain restricted applications the particle-mesh methods in GALAXY are 50 to 200 times faster than a widely-used tree code. After reading in data providing the initial positions, velocities, and (optionally) masses of the particles, GALAXY compute the gravitational accelerations acting on each particle and integrates forward the velocities and positions of the particles for a short time step, repeating these two steps as desired. Intermediate results can be saved, as can the final moment in a state from which the integration could be resumed. Particles can have individual masses and their motion can be integrated using a range of time steps for greater efficiency; message-passing-interface (MPI) calls are available to enable GALAXY's use on parallel machines with high efficiency.

[ascl:1904.003] CGS: Collisionless Galactic Simulator

CGS (Collisionless Galactic Simulator) uses Fourier techniques to solve the Possion equation ∇2Φ = 4πGρ, relating the mean potential Φ of a system to the mass density ρ. The angular dependence of the force is treated exactly in terms of the single-particle Legendre polynomials, which preserves accuracy and avoids systematic errors. The density is assigned to a radial grid by means of a cloud-in-cell scheme with a linear kernel, i.e., a particle contributes to the density of the two closest cells with a weight depending linearly on the distance from the center of the cell considered. The same kernel is then used to assign the force from the grid to the particle. The time step is chosen adaptively in such a way that particles are not allowed to cross more than one radial cell during one step. CGS is based on van Albada's code (1982) and is distributed in the NEMO (ascl:1010.051) Stellar Dynamics Toolbox.

[submitted] SimCADO - An observations simulator for infrared telescopes and instruments

SimCADO is a python package which allows the user to simulate observations with any NIR/Vis imaging system. The package was originally designed to simulate images for the European extremely large telescope (ELT) and MICADO, however with the proper input it is capable of simulating observations from many different Telescope + Instrument configurations.

The documentation can be found here: https://simcado.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

[ascl:1904.004] ehtim: Imaging, analysis, and simulation software for radio interferometry

ehtim (eht-imaging) simulates and manipulates VLBI data and produces images with regularized maximum likelihood methods. The package contains several primary classes for loading, simulating, and manipulating VLBI data. The main classes are the Image, Array, Obsdata, Imager, and Caltable classes, which provide tools for loading images and data, producing simulated data from realistic u-v tracks, calibrating, inspecting, and plotting data, and producing images from data sets in various polarizations using various data terms and regularizers.

[ascl:1904.005] SMILI: Sparse Modeling Imaging Library for Interferometry

SMILI uses sparse sampling techniques and other regularization methods for interferometric imaging. The python-interfaced library is mainly designed for very long baseline interferometry, and has been under the active development primarily for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT).

[ascl:1904.006] CDAWeb: Coordinated Data Analysis Web

CDAWeb (Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop Web) enables viewing essentially any data produced in Common Data Format/CDF with the ISTP/IACG Guidelines and supports interactive plotting of variables from multiple instruments on multiple investigations simultaneously on arbitrary, user-defined time-scales. It also supports data retrieval in both CDF or ASCII format. NASA's GSFC Space Physics Data Facility maintains a publicly available database that includes approximately 600 data variables from Geotail, Wind, Interball, Polar, SOHO, ancilliary spacecraft and ground-based investigations. CDAWeb includes high resolution digital data products that support event correlative science. The system combines the client-server user interface technology of the Web with a powerful set of customized routines based in the COTS Interactive Data Language (IDL) package to leverage the data format standards.

[ascl:1904.007] AutoBayes: Automatic design of customized analysis algorithms and programs

AutoBayes automatically generates customized algorithms from compact, declarative specifications in the data analysis domain, taking a statistical model as input and creating documented and optimized C/C++ code. The synthesis process uses Bayesian networks to enable problem decompositions and guide the algorithm derivation. Program schemas encapsulate advanced algorithms and data structures, and a symbolic-algebraic system finds closed-form solutions for problems and emerging subproblems. AutoBayes has been used to analyze planetary nebulae images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, and can be applied to other scientific data analysis tasks.

[ascl:1904.008] repack: Repack and compress line-transition data

repack re-packs and compresses line-transition data for radiative-transfer calculations. It identifies the strong lines that dominate the spectrum from the large-majority of weaker lines, returning a binary line-by-line (LBL) file with the strong lines info (wavenumber, Elow, gf, and isotope ID), and an ASCII file with the combined contribution of the weaker lines compressed into a continuum extinction coefficient (in cm-1 amagat-1) as function of wavenumber and temperature.

[submitted] deproject

Deproject is a Sherpa extension package to facilitate deprojection of two-dimensional annular X-ray spectra to recover the three-dimensional source properties. For typical thermal models this would include the radial temperature and density profiles. This basic method has been used extensively for X-ray cluster analysis and is the basis for the XSPEC model projct. The deproject module brings this functionality to Sherpa as a Python module that is straightforward to use and understand.

The basic physical assumption of deproject is that the extended source emissivity is constant and optically thin within spherical shells whose radii correspond to the annuli used to extract the specta. Given this assumption one constructs a model for each annular spectrum that is a linear volume-weighted combination of shell models.

[submitted] dfitspy: A dfits|fitsort implementation in Python

The FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) is one of the most used format in astronomy. It is used to store a lot of different types of data such as 1D or 2D spectra, 3D data cubes. The FITS files are built with two components. The data themselves are stored as tables and contains any types of data. Then a header is built containing set of keywords-value pairs aiming at describing the data themselves.

The present python module, dfitspy, is a small project that migrates the main dfits and fitsort capabilities to python. It is a metadata searcher/displayer for FITS files. As dfits and fitsort, dfitspy is able to display in the terminal the result of a metadata search and is able to grep certain values of keywords inside large samples of files. Therefore it can be used directly with the command line interface. Nevertheless, dfitspy can be, and it is its strength, imported as a python module the user can use these functionnalities inside another python code or the python interpretor.

[submitted] Specstack: A simple spectral stacking tool

Specstack is a simple tool to create stacked spectra. It uses a simple algorithm with sigma-clipping, to combine the spectra of galaxies in the rest-frame. It is written completely in Python and is started from the command-line.

[submitted] Empirical Intergalactic Medium extinction models at 1.5

We provide in this publication empirical intergalactic medium extinction models based on Madau and Meiksin models. They provide, at any redshift between 1.5 and 7, seven extinction curves.

[submitted] FortesFit: flexible spectral energy distribution modelling with a Bayesian backbone

Astronomical sources display a large diversity in their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) due to the diversity of components that contribute to their luminous output. FortesFit is an open-source Python package for efficient exploration and discrimination between various SED models. It adds the power of Bayesian inference to a framework that is designed for the easy incorporation and relative assessment of SED models, various fitting engines, and a powerful treatment of priors, especially those that may arise from non-traditional wave-bands such as the X-ray or radio emission, or from spectroscopic measurements. It has been designed with particular emphasis for its scalability to large datasets and surveys.

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