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Results 1301-1400 of 2075 (2041 ASCL, 34 submitted)

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[ascl:1210.001] GP2PCF: Brute-force computation of 2-point correlation functions

The two-point correlation function is a simple statistic that quantifies the clustering of a given distribution of objects. In studies of the large scale structure of the Universe, it is an important tool containing information about the matter clustering and the evolution of the Universe at different cosmological epochs. A classical application of this statistic is the galaxy-galaxy correlation function to find constraints on the parameter Omega_m or the location of the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak. This calculation, however, is very expensive in terms of computer power and Graphics Processing Units provide one solution for efficient analysis of the increasingly larger galaxy surveys that are currently taking place.

GP2PCF is a public code in CUDA for performing this computation; with a single GPU board it is possible to achieve 120-fold speedups with respect to a standard implementation in C running on a single CPU. With respect to other solutions such as k-trees the improvement is of a factor of a few retaining full precision. The speedup is comparable to running in parallel in a cluster of O(100) cores.

[ascl:1210.003] GOSSIP: SED fitting code

GOSSIP fits the electro-magnetic emission of an object (the SED, Spectral Energy Distribution) against synthetic models to find the simulated one that best reproduces the observed data. It builds-up the observed SED of an object (or a large sample of objects) combining magnitudes in different bands and eventually a spectrum; then it performs a chi-square minimization fitting procedure versus a set of synthetic models. The fitting results are used to estimate a number of physical parameters like the Star Formation History, absolute magnitudes, stellar mass and their Probability Distribution Functions.

[ascl:1801.009] Gnuastro: GNU Astronomy Utilities

Gnuastro (GNU Astronomy Utilities) manipulates and analyzes astronomical data. It is an official GNU package of a large collection of programs and C/C++ library functions. Command-line programs perform arithmetic operations on images, convert FITS images to common types like JPG or PDF, convolve an image with a given kernel or matching of kernels, perform cosmological calculations, crop parts of large images (possibly in multiple files), manipulate FITS extensions and keywords, and perform statistical operations. In addition, it contains programs to make catalogs from detection maps, add noise, make mock profiles with a variety of radial functions using monte-carlo integration for their centers, match catalogs, and detect objects in an image among many other operations. The command-line programs share the same basic command-line user interface for the comfort of both the users and developers. Gnuastro is written to comply fully with the GNU coding standards and integrates well with all Unix-like operating systems. This enables astronomers to expect a fully familiar experience in the source code, building, installing and command-line user interaction that they have seen in all the other GNU software that they use. Gnuastro's extensive library is included for users who want to build their own unique programs.

[ascl:1708.013] GMM: Gaussian Mixture Modeling

GMM (Gaussian Mixture Modeling) tests the existence of bimodality in globular cluster color distributions. GMM uses three indicators to distinguish unimodal and bimodal distributions: the kurtosis of the distribution, the separation of the peaks, and the probability of obtaining the same χ2 from a unimodal distribution.

[ascl:1710.015] GMCALab: Generalized Morphological Component Analysis

GMCALab solves Blind Source Separation (BSS) problems from multichannel/multispectral/hyperspectral data. In essence, multichannel data provide different observations of the same physical phenomena (e.g. multiple wavelengths), which are modeled as a linear combination of unknown elementary components or sources. Written as a set of Matlab toolboxes, it provides a generic framework that can be extended to tackle different matrix factorization problems.

[ascl:1402.002] Glue: Linked data visualizations across multiple files

Glue, written in Python, links visualizations of scientific datasets across many files, allowing for interactive, linked statistical graphics of multiple files. It supports many file formats including common image formats (jpg, tiff, png), ASCII tables, astronomical image and table formats (FITS, VOT, IPAC), and HDF5. Custom data loaders can also be easily added. Glue is highly scriptable and extendable.

[ascl:1807.019] GLS: Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram

The Lomb-Scargle periodogram is a common tool in the frequency analysis of unequally spaced data equivalent to least-squares fitting of sine waves. GLS is a solution for the generalization to a full sine wave fit, including an offset and weights (χ2 fitting). Compared to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, GLS is superior as it provides more accurate frequencies, is less susceptible to aliasing, and gives a much better determination of the spectral intensity.

[ascl:1011.010] Global Sky Model (GSM): A Model of Diffuse Galactic Radio Emission from 10 MHz to 100 GHz

Understanding diffuse Galactic radio emission is interesting both in its own right and for minimizing foreground contamination of cosmological measurements. Cosmic Microwave Background experiments have focused on frequencies > 10 GHz, whereas 21 cm tomography of the high redshift universe will mainly focus on < 0.2 GHz, for which less is currently known about Galactic emission. Motivated by this, we present a global sky model derived from all publicly available total power large-area radio surveys, digitized with optical character recognition when necessary and compiled into a uniform format, as well as the new Villa Elisa data extending the 1.4 GHz map to the entire sky. We quantify statistical and systematic uncertainties in these surveys by comparing them with various global multi-frequency model fits. We find that a principal component based model with only three components can fit the 11 most accurate data sets (at 10, 22, 45 & 408 MHz and 1.4, 2.3, 23, 33, 41, 61, 94 GHz) to an accuracy around 1%-10% depending on frequency and sky region. The data compilation and software returning a predicted all-sky map at any frequency from 10 MHz to 100 GHz are publicly available in the archive file at the link below.

[ascl:1110.008] Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface.

Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

[ascl:1802.010] Glimpse: Sparsity based weak lensing mass-mapping tool

Glimpse, also known as Glimpse2D, is a weak lensing mass-mapping tool that relies on a robust sparsity-based regularization scheme to recover high resolution convergence from either gravitational shear alone or from a combination of shear and flexion. Including flexion allows the supplementation of the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map. To preserve all available small scale information, Glimpse avoids any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treats the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularized using a multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators.

[ascl:1103.006] GLESP 2.0: Gauss-Legendre Sky Pixelization for CMB Analysis

GLESP is a pixelization scheme for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps. This scheme is based on the Gauss-Legendre polynomials zeros and allows one to create strict orthogonal expansion of the map.

[ascl:1806.009] GLASS: Parallel, free-form gravitational lens modeling tool and framework

GLASS models strong gravitational lenses. It produces an ensemble of possible models that fit the observed input data and conform to certain constraints specified by the user. GLASS makes heavy use of the numerical routines provided by the numpy and scipy packages as well as the linear programming package GLPK. This latter package, and its Python interface, is provided with GLASS and installs automatically in the GLASS build directory.

[ascl:1010.012] glafic: Software Package for Analyzing Gravitational Lensing

glafic is a public software package for analyzing gravitational lensing. It offers many features including computations of various lens properties for many mass models, solving the lens equation using an adaptive grid algorithm, simulations of lensed extended images with PSF convolved, and efficient modeling of observed strong lens systems.

[ascl:1812.002] GLADIS: GLobal Accretion Disk Instability Simulation

GLADIS (GLobal Accretion Disk Instability Simulation) computes the time-dependent evolution of a black hole accretion disk, in one-dimensional, axisymmetric, vertically integrated scheme. The code solves two partial-differential equations of hydrodynamics for surface density and temperature evolution, i.e., given by viscous diffusion and energy conservation. Accretion disks can be subject to radiation-pressure instability if the stress tensor is proportional to the total (gas plus radiation) pressure. In the gas-pressure dominated case there is no instability. An intermediate case is provided in the code by the square root of the gas and total pressures. GLADIS is parallelized with MPI, and sample .ini and run command files are provided with the code.

[ascl:1805.025] GLACiAR: GaLAxy survey Completeness AlgoRithm

GLACiAR (GaLAxy survey Completeness AlgoRithm) estimates the completeness and selection functions in galaxy surveys. Tailored for multiband imaging surveys aimed at searching for high-redshift galaxies through the Lyman Break technique, the code can nevertheless be applied broadly. GLACiAR generates artificial galaxies that follow Sérsic profiles with different indexes and with customizable size, redshift and spectral energy distribution properties, adds them to input images, and measures the recovery rate.

[submitted] GizmoAnalysis: read and analyze Gizmo simulations

GizmoAnalysis reads and analyzes N-body simulations run with the Gizmo code (ascl:1410.003). Written in Python 3, we developed it primarily to analyze FIRE simulations, though it is useable with any Gizmo snapshot files. It offers the following functionality: reads snapshot files and converts particle data to physical units; provides a flexible dictionary class to store particle data and compute derived quantities on the fly; plots images and properties of particles; generates region files for input to MUSIC (ascl:1311.011) to generate cosmological zoom-in initial conditions; computes rates of supernovae and stellar winds, including their nucleosynthetic yields, as used in FIRE simulations. Includes a Jupyter notebook tutorial.

[submitted] GizmoAnalysis: read and analyze Gizmo simulations

GizmoAnalysis reads and analyzes N-body simulations run with the Gizmo code (ascl:1410.003). Written in Python, we developed it primarily to analyze FIRE simulations, though it is useable with any Gizmo snapshot files. It offers the following functionality: reads snapshot files and converts particle data to physical units; provides a flexible dictionary class to store particle data and compute derived quantities on the fly; plots images and properties of particles; generates region files for input to MUSIC (ascl:1311.011) to generate cosmological zoom-in initial conditions; computes rates of supernovae and stellar winds, including their nucleosynthetic yields, as used in FIRE simulations. Includes a Jupyter notebook tutorial.

[ascl:1410.003] GIZMO: Multi-method magneto-hydrodynamics+gravity code

GIZMO is a flexible, multi-method magneto-hydrodynamics+gravity code that solves the hydrodynamic equations using a variety of different methods. It introduces new Lagrangian Godunov-type methods that allow solving the fluid equations with a moving particle distribution that is automatically adaptive in resolution and avoids the advection errors, angular momentum conservation errors, and excessive diffusion problems that seriously limit the applicability of “adaptive mesh” (AMR) codes, while simultaneously avoiding the low-order errors inherent to simpler methods like smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH). GIZMO also allows the use of SPH either in “traditional” form or “modern” (more accurate) forms, or use of a mesh. Self-gravity is solved quickly with a BH-Tree (optionally a hybrid PM-Tree for periodic boundaries) and on-the-fly adaptive gravitational softenings. The code is descended from P-GADGET, itself descended from GADGET-2 (ascl:0003.001), and many of the naming conventions remain (for the sake of compatibility with the large library of GADGET work and analysis software).

[ascl:1907.025] GIST: Galaxy IFU Spectroscopy Tool

GIST (Galaxy IFU Spectroscopy Tool) provides a convenient all-in-one framework for the scientific analysis of fully reduced, (integral-field) spectroscopic data, conducting all the steps from the preparation of input data to the scientific analysis and to the production of publication-quality plots. In its basic set-up, the GIST pipeline extracts stellar kinematics, performs an emission-line analysis, and derives stellar population properties from full spectral fitting and via the measurement of absorption line-strength indices by exploiting pPXF (ascl:1210.002)and GandALF routines. The pipeline is not specific to any instrument or analysis technique, and includes a dedicated visualization routine with a sophisticated graphical user interface for fully interactive plotting of all measurements, spectra, fits, and residuals, as well as star formation histories and the weight distribution of the models.

[ascl:1810.012] GiRaFFE: General relativistic force-free electrodynamics code

GiRaFFE leverages the Einstein Toolkit's (ascl:1102.014) highly-scalable infrastructure to create large-scale simulations of magnetized plasmas in strong, dynamical spacetimes on adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) grids. It is based on IllinoisGRMHD, a user-friendly, open-source, dynamical-spacetime GRMHD code, and is highly scalable, to tens of thousands of cores.

[ascl:1109.018] GIPSY: Groningen Image Processing System

GIPSY is an acronym of Groningen Image Processing SYstem. It is a highly interactive software system for the reduction and display of astronomical data. It supports multi-tasking using a versatile user interface, it has an advanced data structure, a powerful script language and good display facilities based on the X Window system.

GIPSY consists of a number of components which can be divided into a number of classes:

  • The user interfaces. Currently two user interfaces are available; one for interactive work and one for batch processing.
  • The data structure.
  • The display utilities.
  • The application programs. These are the majority of programs.
GIPSY was designed originally for the reduction of interferometric data from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, but in its history of more than 20 years it has grown to a system capable of handling data from many different instruments (e.g. TAURUS, IRAS etc.).

[ascl:1303.020] Ginga: Flexible FITS viewer

Ginga is a viewer for astronomical data FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files; the viewer centers around a FITS display widget which supports zooming and panning, color and intensity mapping, a choice of several automatic cut levels algorithms and canvases for plotting scalable geometric forms. In addition to this widget, the FITS viewer provides a flexible plugin framework for extending the viewer with many different features. A fairly complete set of "standard" plugins are provided for expected features of a modern viewer: panning and zooming windows, star catalog access, cuts, star pick/fwhm, thumbnails, and others. This viewer was written by software engineers at Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and is in use at that facility.

[ascl:1004.001] GIM2D: Galaxy IMage 2D

GIM2D (Galaxy IMage 2D) is an IRAF/SPP package written to perform detailed bulge/disk decompositions of low signal-to-noise images of distant galaxies in a fully automated way. GIM2D takes an input image from HST or ground-based telescopes and outputs a galaxy-subtracted image as well as a catalog of structural parameters.

[ascl:1305.010] GILDAS: Grenoble Image and Line Data Analysis Software

GILDAS is a collection of software oriented toward (sub-)millimeter radioastronomical applications (either single-dish or interferometer). It has been adopted as the IRAM standard data reduction package and is jointly maintained by IRAM & CNRS. GILDAS contains many facilities, most of which are oriented towards spectral line mapping and many kinds of 3-dimensional data. The code, written in Fortran-90 with a few parts in C/C++ (mainly keyboard interaction, plotting, widgets), is easily extensible.

[ascl:1112.005] GIDGET: Gravitational Instability-Dominated Galaxy Evolution Tool

Observations of disk galaxies at z~2 have demonstrated that turbulence driven by gravitational instability can dominate the energetics of the disk. GIDGET is a 1D simulation code, which we have made publicly available, that economically evolves these galaxies from z~2 to z~0 on a single CPU in a matter of minutes, tracking column density, metallicity, and velocity dispersions of gaseous and multiple stellar components. We include an H$_2$ regulated star formation law and the effects of stellar heating by transient spiral structure. We use this code to demonstrate a possible explanation for the existence of a thin and thick disk stellar population and the age-velocity dispersion correlation of stars in the solar neighborhood: the high velocity dispersion of gas in disks at z~2 decreases along with the cosmological accretion rate, while at lower redshift, the dynamically colder gas forms the low velocity dispersion stars of the thin disk.

[ascl:1107.002] GIBIS: Gaia Instrument and Basic Image Simulator

GIBIS is a pixel-level simulator of the Gaia mission. It is intended to simulate how the Gaia instruments will observe the sky, using realistic simulations of the astronomical sources and of the instrumental properties. It is a branch of the global Gaia Simulator under development within the Gaia DPAC CU2 Group (Data Simulations). Access is currently restricted to Gaia DPAC teams.

[ascl:1112.008] GGobi: A data visualization system

GGobi is an open source visualization program for exploring high-dimensional data. It provides highly dynamic and interactive graphics such as tours, as well as familiar graphics such as the scatterplot, barchart and parallel coordinates plots. Plots are interactive and linked with brushing and identification.

[ascl:1510.001] GGADT: Generalized Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory

GGADT uses anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) to compute the differential scattering cross section (or the total cross sections as a function of energy) for a specified grain of arbitrary geometry (natively supports spheres, ellipsoids, and clusters of spherical monomers). It is written in Fortran 95. ADT is valid when the grain is large compared to the wavelength of incident light. GGADT can calculate either the integrated cross sections (absorption, scattering, extinction) as a function of energy, or it can calculate the differential scattering cross section as a function of scattering angle.

[ascl:1509.008] GFARGO: FARGO for GPU

GFARGO is a GPU version of FARGO (ascl:1102.017). It is written in C and C for CUDA and runs only on NVIDIA’s graphics cards. Though it corresponds to the standard, isothermal version of FARGO, not all functionalities of the CPU version have been translated to CUDA. The code is available in single and double precision versions, the latter compatible with FERMI architectures. GFARGO can run on a graphics card connected to the display, allowing the user to see in real time how the fields evolve.

[ascl:1608.014] gevolution: General Relativity Cosmological N-body code for evolution of large scale structures

The N-body code gevolution complies with general relativity principles at every step; it calculates all six metric degrees of freedom in Poisson gauge. N-body particles are evolved by solving the geodesic equation written in terms of a canonical momentum to remain valid for relativistic particles. gevolution can be extended to include different kinds of dark energy or modified gravity models, going beyond the usually adopted quasi-static approximation. A weak field expansion is the central element of gevolution; this permits the code to treat settings in which no strong gravitational fields appear, including arbitrary scenarios with relativistic sources as long as gravitational fields are not very strong. The framework is well suited for cosmology, but may also be useful for astrophysical applications with moderate gravitational fields where a Newtonian treatment is insufficient.

[ascl:1507.014] getsources: Multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction

getsources is a powerful multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm. It analyzes fine spatial decompositions of original images across a wide range of scales and across all wavebands, cleans those single-scale images of noise and background, and constructs wavelength-independent single-scale detection images that preserve information in both spatial and wavelength dimensions. getsources offers several advantages over other existing methods of source extraction, including the filtering out of irrelevant spatial scales to improve detectability, especially in the crowded regions and for extended sources, the ability to combine data over all wavebands, and the full automation of the extraction process.

[ascl:1705.007] getimages: Background derivation and image flattening method

getimages performs background derivation and image flattening for high-resolution images obtained with space observatories. It is based on median filtering with sliding windows corresponding to a range of spatial scales from the observational beam size up to a maximum structure width X. The latter is a single free parameter of getimages that can be evaluated manually from the observed image. The median filtering algorithm provides a background image for structures of all widths below X. The same median filtering procedure applied to an image of standard deviations derived from a background-subtracted image results in a flattening image. Finally, a flattened image is computed by dividing the background-subtracted by the flattening image. Standard deviations in the flattened image are now uniform outside sources and filaments. Detecting structures in such radically simplified images results in much cleaner extractions that are more complete and reliable. getimages also reduces various observational and map-making artifacts and equalizes noise levels between independent tiles of mosaicked images. The code (a Bash script) uses FORTRAN utilities from getsources (ascl:1507.014), which must be installed.

[ascl:1512.002] GetData: A filesystem-based, column-oriented database format for time-ordered binary data

The GetData Project is the reference implementation of the Dirfile Standards, a filesystem-based, column-oriented database format for time-ordered binary data. Dirfiles provide a fast, simple format for storing and reading data, suitable for both quicklook and analysis pipelines. GetData provides a C API and bindings exist for various other languages. GetData is distributed under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License.

[ascl:1412.012] GeoTOA: Geocentric TOA tools

GeoTOA computes the pulse times of arrival (TOAs) at an observatory (or spacecraft) from unbinned Fermi LAT data. Written in Python, the software requires NumPy, matplotlib, SciPy, FSSC Science Tools, and Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015).

[ascl:1511.015] George: Gaussian Process regression

George is a fast and flexible library, implemented in C++ with Python bindings, for Gaussian Process regression useful for accounting for correlated noise in astronomical datasets, including those for transiting exoplanet discovery and characterization and stellar population modeling.

[ascl:1011.015] Geokerr: Computing Photon Orbits in a Kerr Spacetime

Relativistic radiative transfer problems require the calculation of photon trajectories in curved spacetime. Programmed in Fortran, Geokerr uses a novel technique for rapid and accurate calculation of null geodesics in the Kerr metric. The equations of motion from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are reduced directly to Carlson's elliptic integrals, simplifying algebraic manipulations and allowing all coordinates to be computed semi-analytically for the first time.

[ascl:1706.006] GenPK: Power spectrum generator

GenPK generates the 3D matter power spectra for each particle species from a Gadget snapshot. Written in C++, it requires both FFTW3 and GadgetReader.

[ascl:1812.014] GENGA: Gravitational ENcounters with Gpu Acceleration

GENGA (Gravitational ENcounters with Gpu Acceleration) integrates planet and planetesimal dynamics in the late stage of planet formation and stability analyses of planetary systems. It uses mixed variable integration when the motion is a perturbed Kepler orbit and combines this with a direct N-body Bulirsch-Stoer method during close encounters. It supports three simulation modes: 1.) integration of up to 2048 massive bodies; 2.) integration with up to a million test particles; and 3.) parallel integration of a large number of individual planetary systems.

[ascl:1212.005] General complex polynomial root solver

This general complex polynomial root solver, implemented in Fortran and further optimized for binary microlenses, uses a new algorithm to solve polynomial equations and is 1.6-3 times faster than the ZROOTS subroutine that is commercially available from Numerical Recipes, depending on application. The largest improvement, when compared to naive solvers, comes from a fail-safe procedure that permits skipping the majority of the calculations in the great majority of cases, without risking catastrophic failure in the few cases that these are actually required.

[ascl:1007.003] GEMINI: A toolkit for analytical models of two-point correlations and inhomogeneous structure formation

Gemini is a toolkit for analytical models of two-point correlations and inhomogeneous structure formation. It extends standard Press-Schechter theory to inhomogeneous situations, allowing a realistic, analytical calculation of halo correlations and bias.

[ascl:1608.006] Gemini IRAF: Data reduction software for the Gemini telescopes

The Gemini IRAF package processes observational data obtained with the Gemini telescopes. It is an external package layered upon IRAF and supports data from numerous instruments, including FLAMINGOS-2, GMOS-N, GMOS-S, GNIRS, GSAOI, NIFS, and NIRI. The Gemini IRAF package is organized into sub-packages; it contains a generic tools package, "gemtools", along with instrument-specific packages. The raw data from the Gemini facility instruments are stored as Multi-Extension FITS (MEF) files. Therefore, all the tasks in the Gemini IRAF package, intended for processing data from the Gemini facility instruments, are capable of handling MEF files.

[ascl:1010.079] Geant4: A Simulation Toolkit for the Passage of Particles through Matter

Geant4 is a toolkit for simulating the passage of particles through matter. It includes a complete range of functionality including tracking, geometry, physics models and hits. The physics processes offered cover a comprehensive range, including electromagnetic, hadronic and optical processes, a large set of long-lived particles, materials and elements, over a wide energy range starting, in some cases, from 250eV and extending in others to the TeV energy range. It has been designed and constructed to expose the physics models utilised, to handle complex geometries, and to enable its easy adaptation for optimal use in different sets of applications. The toolkit is the result of a worldwide collaboration of physicists and software engineers. It has been created exploiting software engineering and object-oriented technology and implemented in the C++ programming language. It has been used in applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, accelerator design, space engineering and medical physics.

[ascl:1811.018] gdr2_completeness: GaiaDR2 data retrieval and manipulation

gdr2_completeness queries Gaia DR2 TAP services and divides the queries into sub-queries chunked into arbitrary healpix bins. Downloaded data are formatted into arrays. Internal completeness is calculated by dividing the total starcount and starcounts with an applied cut (e.g., radial velocity measurement and good parallax). Independent determination of the external GDR2 completeness per healpix (level 6) and G magnitude bin (3 coarse bins: 8-12,12-15,15-18) is inferred from a crossmatch with 2MASS data. The overall completeness of a specific GDR2 sample can be approximated by multiplying the internal with the external completeness map, which is useful when data are compared to models thereof. Jupyter notebooks showcasing both utilities enable the user to easily construct the overall completeness for arbitrary samples of the GDR2 catalogue.

[ascl:1303.019] GBTIDL: Reduction and Analysis of GBT Spectral Line Data

GBTIDL is an interactive package for reduction and analysis of spectral line data taken with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The package, written entirely in IDL, consists of straightforward yet flexible calibration, averaging, and analysis procedures (the "GUIDE layer") modeled after the UniPOPS and CLASS data reduction philosophies, a customized plotter with many built-in visualization features, and Data I/O and toolbox functionality that can be used for more advanced tasks. GBTIDL makes use of data structures which can also be used to store intermediate results. The package consumes and produces data in GBT SDFITS format. GBTIDL can be run online and have access to the most recent data coming off the telescope, or can be run offline on preprocessed SDFITS files.

[ascl:1908.006] GBKFIT: Galaxy kinematic modeling

GBKFIT performs galaxy kinematic modeling. It can be used to extract morphological and kinematical properties of galaxies by fitting models to spatially resolved kinematic data. The software can also take beam smearing into account by using the knowledge of the line and point spread functions. GBKFIT can take advantage of many-core and massively parallel architectures such as multi-core CPUs and Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), making it suitable for modeling large-scale surveys of thousands of galaxies within a very seasonable time frame. GBKFIT features an extensible object-oriented architecture that supports arbitrary models and optimization techniques in the form of modules; users can write custom modules without modifying GBKFIT’s source code. The software is written in C++ and conforms to the latest ISO standards.

[ascl:1710.014] GBART: Determination of the orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries

GBART is an improved version of the code for determining the orbital elements for spectroscopic binaries originally written by Bertiau & Grobben (1968).

[ascl:1907.020] GaussPy+: Gaussian decomposition package for emission line spectra

GaussPy+ is a fully automated Gaussian decomposition package for emission line spectra. It is based on GaussPy (ascl:1907.019) and offers several improvements, including automating preparatory steps and providing an accurate noise estimation, improving the fitting routine, and providing a routine to refit spectra based on neighboring fit solutions. GaussPy+ handles complex emission and low to moderate signal-to-noise values.

[ascl:1907.019] GaussPy: Python implementation of the Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition algorithm

GaussPy implements the Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD) algorithm, which uses computer vision and machine learning techniques to provide optimized initial guesses for the parameters of a multi-component Gaussian model automatically and efficiently. The speed and adaptability of AGD allow it to interpret large volumes of spectral data efficiently. Although it was initially designed for applications in radio astrophysics, AGD can be used to search for one-dimensional Gaussian (or any other single-peaked spectral profile)-shaped components in any data set. To determine how many Gaussian functions to include in a model and what their parameters are, AGD uses a technique called derivative spectroscopy. The derivatives of a spectrum can efficiently identify shapes within that spectrum corresponding to the underlying model, including gradients, curvature and edges.

[ascl:1305.009] GaussFit: Solving least squares and robust estimation problems

GaussFit solves least squares and robust estimation problems; written originally for reduction of NASA Hubble Space Telescope data, it includes a complete programming language designed especially to formulate estimation problems, a built-in compiler and interpreter to support the programming language, and a built-in algebraic manipulator for calculating the required partial derivatives analytically. The code can handle nonlinear models, exact constraints, correlated observations, and models where the equations of condition contain more than one observed quantity. Written in C, GaussFit includes an experimental robust estimation capability so data sets contaminated by outliers can be handled simply and efficiently.

[ascl:1406.018] GAUSSCLUMPS: Gaussian-shaped clumping from a spectral map

GAUSSCLUMPS decomposes a spectral map into Gaussian-shape clumps. The clump-finding algorithm decomposes a spectral data cube by iteratively removing 3-D Gaussians as representative clumps. GAUSSCLUMPS was originally a separate code distribution but is now a contributed package in GILDAS (ascl:1305.010). A reimplementation can also be found in CUPID (ascl:1311.007).

[ascl:1610.007] gatspy: General tools for Astronomical Time Series in Python

Gatspy contains efficient, well-documented implementations of several common routines for Astronomical time series analysis, including the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, the Supersmoother method, and others.

[ascl:1710.019] GASOLINE: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code

Gasoline solves the equations of gravity and hydrodynamics in astrophysical problems, including simulations of planets, stars, and galaxies. It uses an SPH method that features correct mixing behavior in multiphase fluids and minimal artificial viscosity. This method is identical to the SPH method used in the ChaNGa code (ascl:1105.005), allowing users to extend results to problems requiring >100,000 cores. Gasoline uses a fast, memory-efficient O(N log N) KD-Tree to solve Poisson's Equation for gravity and avoids artificial viscosity in non-shocking compressive flows.

[ascl:1210.020] GASGANO: Data File Organizer

GASGANO is a GUI software tool for managing and viewing data files produced by VLT Control System (VCS) and the Data Flow System (DFS). It is developed and maintained by ESO to help its user community manage and organize astronomical data observed and produced by all VLT compliant telescopes in a systematic way. The software understands FITS, PAF, and ASCII files, and Reduction Blocks, and can group, sort, classify, filter, and search data in addition to allowing the user to browse, view, and manage them.

[ascl:1010.049] Gas-momentum-kinetic SZ cross-correlations

We present a new method for detecting the missing baryons by generating a template for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The template is computed from the product of a reconstructed velocity field with a galaxy field. We provide maps of such templates constructed from SDSS Data Release 7 spectroscopic data (SDSS VAGC sample) along side with their expected two point correlation functions with CMB temperature anisotropies. Codes of generating such coefficients of the two point correlation function are also released to provide users of the gas-momentum map a way to change the parameters such as cosmological parameters, reionization history, ionization parameters, etc.

[ascl:1303.027] GaPP: Gaussian Processes in Python

The algorithm Gaussian processes can reconstruct a function from a sample of data without assuming a parameterization of the function. The GaPP code can be used on any dataset to reconstruct a function. It handles individual error bars on the data and can be used to determine the derivatives of the reconstructed function. The data sample can consist of observations of the function and of its first derivative.

[ascl:1602.015] GANDALF: Graphical Astrophysics code for N-body Dynamics And Lagrangian Fluids

GANDALF, a successor to SEREN (ascl:1102.010), is a hybrid self-gravitating fluid dynamics and collisional N-body code primarily designed for investigating star formation and planet formation problems. GANDALF uses various implementations of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to perform hydrodynamical simulations of gas clouds undergoing gravitational collapse to form new stars (or other objects), and can perform simulations of pure N-body dynamics using high accuracy N-body integrators, model the intermediate phase of cluster evolution, and provide visualizations via its python interface as well as interactive simulations. Although based on many of the SEREN routines, GANDALF has been largely re-written from scratch in C++ using more optimal algorithms and data structures.

[ascl:1708.012] GANDALF: Gas AND Absorption Line Fitting

GANDALF (Gas AND Absorption Line Fitting) accurately separates the stellar and emission-line contributions to observed spectra. The IDL code includes reddening by interstellar dust and also returns formal errors on the position, width, amplitude and flux of the emission lines. Example wrappers that make use of pPXF (ascl:1210.002) to derive the stellar kinematics are included.

[ascl:1105.011] Ganalyzer: A tool for automatic galaxy image analysis

Ganalyzer is a model-based tool that automatically analyzes and classifies galaxy images. Ganalyzer works by separating the galaxy pixels from the background pixels, finding the center and radius of the galaxy, generating the radial intensity plot, and then computing the slopes of the peaks detected in the radial intensity plot to measure the spirality of the galaxy and determine its morphological class. Unlike algorithms that are based on machine learning, Ganalyzer is based on measuring the spirality of the galaxy, a task that is difficult to perform manually, and in many cases can provide a more accurate analysis compared to manual observation. Ganalyzer is simple to use, and can be easily embedded into other image analysis applications. Another advantage is its speed, which allows it to analyze ~10,000,000 galaxy images in five days using a standard modern desktop computer. These capabilities can make Ganalyzer a useful tool in analyzing large datasets of galaxy images collected by autonomous sky surveys such as SDSS, LSST or DES.

[ascl:1711.014] Gammapy: Python toolbox for gamma-ray astronomy

Gammapy analyzes gamma-ray data and creates sky images, spectra and lightcurves, from event lists and instrument response information; it can also determine the position, morphology and spectra of gamma-ray sources. It is used to analyze data from H.E.S.S., Fermi-LAT, and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA).

[ascl:1110.007] GammaLib: Toolbox for High-level Analysis of Astronomical Gamma-ray Data

The GammaLib is a versatile toolbox for the high-level analysis of astronomical gamma-ray data. It is implemented as a C++ library that is fully scriptable in the Python scripting language. The library provides core functionalities such as data input and output, interfaces for parameter specifications, and a reporting and logging interface. It implements instruments specific functionalities such as instrument response functions and data formats. Instrument specific functionalities share a common interface to allow for extension of the GammaLib to include new gamma-ray instruments. The GammaLib provides an abstract data analysis framework that enables simultaneous multi-mission analysis.

[ascl:1612.017] GAMER: GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement code

GAMER (GPU-accelerated Adaptive MEsh Refinement) serves as a general-purpose adaptive mesh refinement + GPU framework and solves hydrodynamics with self-gravity. The code supports adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), hydrodynamics with self-gravity, and a variety of GPU-accelerated hydrodynamic and Poisson solvers. It also supports hybrid OpenMP/MPI/GPU parallelization, concurrent CPU/GPU execution for performance optimization, and Hilbert space-filling curve for load balance. Although the code is designed for simulating galaxy formation, it can be easily modified to solve a variety of applications with different governing equations. All optimization strategies implemented in the code can be inherited straightforwardly.

[ascl:1708.030] GAMBIT: Global And Modular BSM Inference Tool

GAMBIT (Global And Modular BSM Inference Tool) performs statistical global fits of generic physics models using a wide range of particle physics and astrophysics data. Modules provide native simulations of collider and astrophysics experiments, a flexible system for interfacing external codes (the backend system), a fully featured statistical and parameter scanning framework, and additional tools for implementing and using hierarchical models.

[ascl:1304.003] GALSVM: Automated Morphology Classification

GALSVM is IDL software for automated morphology classification. It was specially designed for high redshift data but can be used at low redshift as well. It analyzes morphologies of galaxies based on a particular family of learning machines called support vector machines. The method can be seen as a generalization of the classical CAS classification but with an unlimited number of dimensions and non-linear boundaries between decision regions. It is fully automated and consequently well adapted to large cosmological surveys.

[ascl:1711.010] galstreams: Milky Way streams footprint library and toolkit

galstreams provides a compilation of spatial information for known stellar streams and overdensities in the Milky Way and includes Python tools for visualizing them. ASCII tables are also provided for quick viewing of the stream's footprints using TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010).

[ascl:1711.007] galstep: Initial conditions for spiral galaxy simulations

galstep generates initial conditions for disk galaxy simulations with GADGET-2 (ascl:0003.001), RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) and GIZMO (ascl:1410.003), including a stellar disk, a gaseous disk, a dark matter halo and a stellar bulge. The first two components follow an exponential density profile, and the last two a Dehnen density profile with gamma=1 by default, corresponding to a Hernquist profile.

[ascl:1402.009] GalSim: Modular galaxy image simulation toolkit

GalSim is a fast, modular software package for simulation of astronomical images. Though its primary purpose is for tests of weak lensing analysis methods, it can be used for other purposes. GalSim allows galaxies and PSFs to be represented in a variety of ways, and can apply shear, magnification, dilation, or rotation to a galaxy profile including lensing-based models from a power spectrum or NFW halo profile. It can write images in regular FITS files, FITS data cubes, or multi-extension FITS files. It can also compress the output files using various compressions including gzip, bzip2, and rice. The user interface is in python or via configuration scripts, and the computations are done in C++ for speed.

[ascl:1411.008] galpy: Galactic dynamics package

galpy is a python package for galactic dynamics. It supports orbit integration in a variety of potentials, evaluating and sampling various distribution functions, and the calculation of action-angle coordinates for all static potentials.

[ascl:1010.028] GALPROP: Code for Cosmic-ray Transport and Diffuse Emission Production

GALPROP is a numerical code for calculating the propagation of relativistic charged particles and the diffuse emissions produced during their propagation. The GALPROP code incorporates as much realistic astrophysical input as possible together with latest theoretical developments. The code calculates the propagation of cosmic-ray nuclei, antiprotons, electrons and positrons, and computes diffuse γ-rays and synchrotron emission in the same framework. Each run of the code is governed by a configuration file allowing the user to specify and control many details of the calculation. Thus, each run of the code corresponds to a potentially different "model." The code continues to be developed and is available to the scientific community.

[ascl:1611.006] GalPot: Galaxy potential code

GalPot finds the gravitational potential associated with axisymmetric density profiles. The package includes code that performs transformations between commonly used coordinate systems for both positions and velocities (the class OmniCoords), and that integrates orbits in the potentials. GalPot is a stand-alone version of Walter Dehnen's GalaxyPotential C++ code taken from the falcON code in the NEMO Stellar Dynamics Toolbox (ascl:1010.051).

[ascl:1501.014] GalPaK 3D: Galaxy parameters and kinematics extraction from 3D data

GalPaK 3D extracts the intrinsic (i.e. deconvolved) galaxy parameters and kinematics from any 3-dimensional data. The algorithm uses a disk parametric model with 10 free parameters (which can also be fixed independently) and a MCMC approach with non-traditional sampling laws in order to efficiently probe the parameter space. More importantly, it uses the knowledge of the 3-dimensional spread-function to return the intrinsic galaxy properties and the intrinsic data-cube. The 3D spread-function class is flexible enough to handle any instrument.

GalPaK 3D can simultaneously constrain the kinematics and morphological parameters of (non-merging, i.e. regular) galaxies observed in non-optimal seeing conditions and can also be used on AO data or on high-quality, high-SNR data to look for non-axisymmetric structures in the residuals.

[ascl:1903.005] Galmag: Computation of realistic galactic magnetic fields

Galmag computes galactic magnetic fields based on mean field dynamo theory. Written in Python, Galmag allows quick exploration of solutions to the mean field dynamo equation based on galaxy parameters specified by the user, such as the scale height profile and the galaxy rotation curves. The magnetic fields are solenoidal by construction and can be helical.

[ascl:1711.011] galkin: Milky Way rotation curve data handler

galkin is a compilation of kinematic measurements tracing the rotation curve of our Galaxy, together with a tool to treat the data. The compilation is optimized to Galactocentric radii between 3 and 20 kpc and includes the kinematics of gas, stars and masers in a total of 2780 measurements collected from almost four decades of literature. The user-friendly software provided selects, treats and retrieves the data of all source references considered. This tool is especially designed to facilitate the use of kinematic data in dynamical studies of the Milky Way with various applications ranging from dark matter constraints to tests of modified gravity.

[ascl:1903.010] GalIMF: Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function

GalIMF (Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function) computes the galaxy-wide initial stellar mass function by integrating over a whole galaxy, parameterized by star formation rate and metallicity. The generated stellar mass distribution depends on the galaxy-wide star formation rate (SFR, which is related to the total mass of a galalxy) and the galaxy-wide metallicity. The code can generate a galaxy-wide IMF (IGIMF) and can also generate all the stellar masses within a galaxy with optimal sampling (OSGIMF). To compute the IGIMF or the OSGIMF, the GalIMF module contains all local IMF properties (e.g. the dependence of the stellar IMF on the metallicity, on the density of the star-cluster forming molecular cloud cores), and this software module can, therefore, be also used to obtain only the stellar IMF with various prescriptions, or to investigate other features of the stellar population such as what is the most massive star that can be formed in a star cluster.

[ascl:1511.010] Galileon-Solver: N-body code

Galileon-Solver adds an extra force to PMCode (ascl:9909.001) using a modified Poisson equation to provide a non-linearly transformed density field, with the operations all performed in real space. The code's implicit spherical top-hat assumption only works over fairly long distance averaging scales, where the coarse-grained picture it relies on is a good approximation of reality; it uses discrete Fourier transforms and cyclic reduction in the usual way.

[ascl:1408.008] GALIC: Galaxy initial conditions construction

GalIC (GALaxy Initial Conditions) is an implementation of an iterative method to construct steady state composite halo-disk-bulge galaxy models with prescribed density distribution and velocity anisotropy that can be used as initial conditions for N-body simulations. The code is parallelized for distributed memory based on MPI. While running, GalIC produces "snapshot files" that can be used as initial conditions files. GalIC supports the three file formats ('type1' format, the slightly improved 'type2' format, and an HDF5 format) of the GADGET (ascl:0003.001) code for its output snapshot files.

[ascl:1510.005] GALFORM: Galactic modeling

GALFORM is a semi-analytic model for calculating the formation and evolution of galaxies in hierarchical clustering cosmologies. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm to follow the merging evolution of dark matter haloes with arbitrary mass resolution, it incorporates realistic descriptions of the density profiles of dark matter haloes and the gas they contain. It follows the chemical evolution of gas and stars, and the associated production of dust and includes a detailed calculation of the sizes of discs and spheroids.

[ascl:1104.010] GALFIT: Detailed Structural Decomposition of Galaxy Images

GALFIT is a two-dimensional (2-D) fitting algorithm designed to extract structural components from galaxy images, with emphasis on closely modeling light profiles of spatially well-resolved, nearby galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. The algorithm improves on previous techniques in two areas: 1.) by being able to simultaneously fit a galaxy with an arbitrary number of components, and 2.) with optimization in computation speed, suited for working on large galaxy images. 2-D models such as the "Nuker'' law, the Sersic (de Vaucouleurs) profile, an exponential disk, and Gaussian or Moffat functions are used. The azimuthal shapes are generalized ellipses that can fit disky and boxy components. Many galaxies with complex isophotes, ellipticity changes, and position-angle twists can be modeled accurately in 2-D. When examined in detail, even simple-looking galaxies generally require at least three components to be modeled accurately rather than the one or two components more often employed. This is illustrated by way of seven case studies, which include regular and barred spiral galaxies, highly disky lenticular galaxies, and elliptical galaxies displaying various levels of complexities. A useful extension of this algorithm is to accurately extract nuclear point sources in galaxies.

[ascl:1810.001] galfast: Milky Way mock catalog generator

galfast generates catalogs for arbitrary, user-supplied Milky Way models, including empirically derived ones. The built-in model set is based on fits to SDSS stellar observations over 8000 deg2 of the sky and includes a three-dimensional dust distribution map. Because of the capability to use empirically derived models, galfast typically produces closer matches to the actual observed counts and color-magnitude diagrams. In particular, galfast-generated catalogs are used to derive the stellar component of “Universe Model” catalogs used by the LSST Project. A key distinguishing characteristic of galfast is its speed. Galfast uses the GPU (with kernels written in NVIDIA C/C++ for CUDA) to offload compute intensive model sampling computations to the GPU, enabling the generation of realistic catalogs to full LSST depth in hours (instead of days or weeks), making it possible to study proposed science cases with high precision.

[ascl:1010.033] GALEV Evolutionary Synthesis Models

GALEV evolutionary synthesis models describe the evolution of stellar populations in general, of star clusters as well as of galaxies, both in terms of resolved stellar populations and of integrated light properties over cosmological timescales of > 13 Gyr from the onset of star formation shortly after the Big Bang until today.

For galaxies, GALEV includes a simultaneous treatment of the chemical evolution of the gas and the spectral evolution of the stellar content, allowing for a chemically consistent treatment using input physics (stellar evolutionary tracks, stellar yields and model atmospheres) for a large range of metallicities and consistently account for the increasing initial abundances of successive stellar generations.

[ascl:1812.009] galclassify: Stellar classifications using a galactic population synthesis model

The stellar classification code galclassify is a stand-alone version of Galaxia (ascl:1101.007). It classifies and generates a synthetic population for each star using input containing observables in a fixed format rather than using a precomputed population over a large field. It is suitable for individual stellar classifications, but slow if you want to classify large samples of stars.

[ascl:1702.006] GalaxyGAN: Generative Adversarial Networks for recovery of galaxy features

GalaxyGAN uses Generative Adversarial Networks to reliably recover features in images of galaxies. The package uses machine learning to train on higher quality data and learns to recover detailed features such as galaxy morphology by effectively building priors. This method opens up the possibility of recovering more information from existing and future imaging data.

[ascl:1312.010] GalaxyCount: Galaxy counts and variance calculator

GalaxyCount calculates the number and standard deviation of galaxies in a magnitude limited observation of a given area. The methods to calculate both the number and standard deviation may be selected from different options. Variances may be computed for circular, elliptical and rectangular window functions.

[ascl:1904.002] GALAXY: N-body simulation software for isolated, collisionless stellar systems

GALAXY evolves (almost) isolated, collisionless stellar systems, both disk-like and ellipsoidal. In addition to the N-body code galaxy, which offers eleven different methods to compute the gravitational accelerations, the package also includes sophisticated set-up and analysis software. While not as versatile as tree codes, for certain restricted applications the particle-mesh methods in GALAXY are 50 to 200 times faster than a widely-used tree code. After reading in data providing the initial positions, velocities, and (optionally) masses of the particles, GALAXY compute the gravitational accelerations acting on each particle and integrates forward the velocities and positions of the particles for a short time step, repeating these two steps as desired. Intermediate results can be saved, as can the final moment in a state from which the integration could be resumed. Particles can have individual masses and their motion can be integrated using a range of time steps for greater efficiency; message-passing-interface (MPI) calls are available to enable GALAXY's use on parallel machines with high efficiency.

[ascl:1101.007] Galaxia: A Code to Generate a Synthetic Survey of the Milky Way

We present here a fast code for creating a synthetic survey of the Milky Way. Given one or more color-magnitude bounds, a survey size and geometry, the code returns a catalog of stars in accordance with a given model of the Milky Way. The model can be specified by a set of density distributions or as an N-body realization. We provide fast and efficient algorithms for sampling both types of models. As compared to earlier sampling schemes which generate stars at specified locations along a line of sight, our scheme can generate a continuous and smooth distribution of stars over any given volume. The code is quite general and flexible and can accept input in the form of a star formation rate, age metallicity relation, age velocity dispersion relation and analytic density distribution functions. Theoretical isochrones are then used to generate a catalog of stars and support is available for a wide range of photometric bands. As a concrete example we implement the Besancon Milky Way model for the disc. For the stellar halo we employ the simulated stellar halo N-body models of Bullock & Johnston (2005). In order to sample N-body models, we present a scheme that disperses the stars spawned by an N-body particle, in such a way that the phase space density of the spawned stars is consistent with that of the N-body particles. The code is ideally suited to generating synthetic data sets that mimic near future wide area surveys such as GAIA, LSST and HERMES. As an application we study the prospect of identifying structures in the stellar halo with a simulated GAIA survey.

[ascl:1901.005] Galaxia_wrap: Galaxia wrapper for generating mock stellar surveys

Galaxia_wrap is a python wrap around the popular Galaxia tool (ascl:1101.007) for generating mock stellar surveys, such as a magnitude limited survey, using a built-in Galaxy model or directly from n-body data. It also offers n-body functionality and has been used to infer the age distribution of a specific stellar tracer population.

[ascl:1104.005] GALAXEV: Evolutionary Stellar Population Synthesis Models

GALAXEV is a library of evolutionary stellar population synthesis models computed using the new isochrone synthesis code of Bruzual & Charlot (2003). This code allows one to computes the spectral evolution of stellar populations in wide ranges of ages and metallicities at a resolution of 3 Å across the whole wavelength range from 3200 Å to 9500 Å, and at lower resolution outside this range.

[ascl:1503.002] Galax2d: 2D isothermal Euler equations solver

Galax2d computes the 2D stationary solution of the isothermal Euler equations of gas dynamics in a rotating galaxy with a weak bar. The gravitational potential represents a weak bar and controls the flow. A damped Newton method solves the second-order upwind discretization of the equations for a steady-state solution, using a consistent linearization and a direct solver. The code can be applied as a tool for generating flow models if used on not too fine meshes, up to 256 by 256 cells for half a disk in polar coordinates.

[ascl:1710.022] galario: Gpu Accelerated Library for Analyzing Radio Interferometer Observations

The galario library exploits the computing power of modern graphic cards (GPUs) to accelerate the comparison of model predictions to radio interferometer observations. It speeds up the computation of the synthetic visibilities given a model image (or an axisymmetric brightness profile) and their comparison to the observations.

[ascl:1203.002] GALAPAGOS: Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor

GALAPAGOS, Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor (ascl:1010.064), automates source detection, two-dimensional light-profile Sersic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications. Based on a single setup, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sersic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection GALAPAGOS applies SExtractor, while GALFIT (ascl:1104.010) is incorporated for modelling Sersic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sersic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SExtractor shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of multiplexing capabilities. It combines SExtractor and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language, IDL. A C implementation of the software, GALAPAGOS-C (ascl:1408.011), is available.

[ascl:1408.011] GALAPAGOS-C: Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas

GALAPAGOS-C is a C implementation of the IDL code GALAPAGOS (ascl:1203.002). It processes a complete set of survey images through automation of source detection via SExtractor (ascl:1010.064), postage stamp cutting, object mask preparation, sky background estimation and complex two-dimensional light profile Sérsic modelling via GALFIT (ascl:1104.010). GALAPAGOS-C uses MPI-parallelization, thus allowing quick processing of large data sets. The code can fit multiple Sérsic profiles to each galaxy, each representing distinct galaxy components (e.g. bulge, disc, bar), and optionally can fit asymmetric Fourier mode distortions.

[ascl:1303.018] Galactus: Modeling and fitting of galaxies from neutral hydrogen (HI) cubes

Galactus, written in python, is an astronomical software tool for the modeling and fitting of galaxies from neutral hydrogen (HI) cubes. Galactus uses a uniform medium to generate a cube. Galactus can perform the full-radiative transfer for the HI, so can model self-absorption in the galaxy.

[ascl:1108.004] Galacticus: A Semi-Analytic Model of Galaxy Formation

Galacticus is designed to solve the physics involved in the formation of galaxies within the current standard cosmological framework. It is of a type of model known as “semi-analytic” in which the numerous complex non-linear physics involved are solved using a combination of analytic approximations and empirical calibrations from more detailed, numerical solutions. Models of this type aim to begin with the initial state of the Universe (specified shortly after the Big Bang) and apply physical principles to determine the properties of galaxies in the Universe at later times, including the present day. Typical properties computed include the mass of stars and gas in each galaxy, broad structural properties (e.g. radii, rotation speeds, geometrical shape etc.), dark matter and black hole contents, and observable quantities such as luminosities, chemical composition etc.

[ascl:1109.011] GalactICS: Galaxy Model Building Package

GalactICS generates N-body realizations of axisymmetric galaxy models consisting of disk, bulge and halo. Some of the code is in Fortran 77, using lines longer than 72 characters in some cases. The -e flag in the makefile allow for this for a Solaris f77 compiler. Other programs are written in C. Again, the linking between these routines works on Solaris systems, but may need to be adjusted for other architectures. We have found that linking using f77 instead of ld will often automatically load the appropriate libraries.

The graphics output by some of the programs (dbh, plotforce, diskdf, plothalo) uses the PGPLOT library. Alternatively, remove all calls to routines with names starting with "PG", as well as the -lpgplot flag in the Makefile, and the programs should still run fine.

[ascl:1302.011] GALA: Stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances

GALA is a freely distributed Fortran code to derive the atmospheric parameters (temperature, gravity, microturbulent velocity and overall metallicity) and abundances for individual species of stellar spectra using the classical method based on the equivalent widths of metallic lines. The abundances of individual spectral lines are derived by using the WIDTH9 code developed by R. L. Kurucz. GALA is designed to obtain the best model atmosphere, by optimizing temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity, after rejecting the discrepant lines. Finally, it computes accurate internal errors for each atmospheric parameter and abundance. The code obtains chemical abundances and atmospheric parameters for large stellar samples quickly, thus making GALA an useful tool in the epoch of the multi-object spectrographs and large surveys.

[ascl:1707.006] Gala: Galactic astronomy and gravitational dynamics

Gala is a Python package (and Astropy affiliated package) for Galactic astronomy and gravitational dynamics. The bulk of the package centers around implementations of gravitational potentials, numerical integration, nonlinear dynamics, and astronomical velocity transformations (i.e. proper motions). Gala uses the Astropy units and coordinates subpackages extensively to provide a clean, pythonic interface to these features but does any heavy-lifting in C and Cython for speed.

[ascl:1403.024] GAIA: Graphical Astronomy and Image Analysis Tool

GAIA is an image and data-cube display and analysis tool for astronomy. It provides the usual facilities of image display tools, plus more astronomically useful ones such as aperture and optimal photometry, contouring, source detection, surface photometry, arbitrary region analysis, celestial coordinate readout, calibration and modification, grid overlays, blink comparison, defect patching and the ability to query on-line catalogues and image servers. It can also display slices from data-cubes, extract and visualize spectra as well as perform full 3D rendering. GAIA uses the Starlink software environment (ascl:1110.012) and is derived from the ESO SkyCat tool (ascl:1109.019).

[ascl:1108.005] Gaepsi: Gadget Visualization Toolkit

Gaepsi is a PYTHON extension for visualizing cosmology simulations produced by Gadget. Visualization is the most important facet of Gaepsi, but it also allows data analysis on GADGET simulations with its growing number of physics related subroutines and constants. Unlike mesh based scheme, SPH simulations are directly visible in the sense that a splatting process is required to produce raster images from the simulations. Gaepsi produces images of 2-dimensional line-of-sight projections of the simulation. Scalar fields and vector fields are both supported.

Besides the traditional way of slicing a simulation, Gaepsi also has built-in support of 'Survey-like' domain transformation proposed by Carlson & White. An improved implementation is used in Gaepsi. Gaepsi both implements an interactive shell for plotting and exposes its API for batch processing. When complied with OpenMP, Gaepsi automatically takes the advantage of the multi-core computers. In interactive mode, Gaepsi is capable of producing images of size up to 32000 x 32000 pixels. The user can zoom, pan and rotate the field with a command in on the finger tip. The interactive mode takes full advantages of matplotlib's rich annotating, labeling and image composition facilities. There are also built-in commands to add objects that are commonly used in cosmology simulations to the figures.

[ascl:0003.001] GADGET-2: A Code for Cosmological Simulations of Structure Formation

The cosmological simulation code GADGET-2, a new massively parallel TreeSPH code, is capable of following a collisionless fluid with the N-body method, and an ideal gas by means of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The implementation of SPH manifestly conserves energy and entropy in regions free of dissipation, while allowing for fully adaptive smoothing lengths. Gravitational forces are computed with a hierarchical multipole expansion, which can optionally be applied in the form of a TreePM algorithm, where only short-range forces are computed with the `tree'-method while long-range forces are determined with Fourier techniques. Time integration is based on a quasi-symplectic scheme where long-range and short-range forces can be integrated with different timesteps. Individual and adaptive short-range timesteps may also be employed. The domain decomposition used in the parallelisation algorithm is based on a space-filling curve, resulting in high flexibility and tree force errors that do not depend on the way the domains are cut. The code is efficient in terms of memory consumption and required communication bandwidth. It has been used to compute the first cosmological N-body simulation with more than 10^10 dark matter particles, reaching a homogeneous spatial dynamic range of 10^5 per dimension in a 3D box. It has also been used to carry out very large cosmological SPH simulations that account for radiative cooling and star formation, reaching total particle numbers of more than 250 million. GADGET-2 is publicly released to the research community.

[ascl:1801.011] GABE: Grid And Bubble Evolver

GABE (Grid And Bubble Evolver) evolves scalar fields (as well as other purposes) on an expanding background for non-canonical and non-linear classical field theory. GABE is based on the Runge-Kutta method.

[ascl:1010.015] Fyris Alpha: Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

Fyris Alpha is a high resolution, shock capturing, multi-phase, up-wind Godunov method hydrodynamics code that includes a variable equation of state and optional microphysics such as cooling, gravity and multiple tracer variables. The code has been designed and developed for use primarily in astrophysical applications, such as galactic and interstellar bubbles, hypersonic shocks, and a range of jet phenomena. Fyris Alpha boasts both higher performance and more detailed microphysics than its predecessors, with the aim of producing output that is closer to the observational domain, such as emission line fluxes, and eventually, detailed spectral synthesis. Fyris Alpha is approximately 75,000 lines of C code; it encapsulates the split sweep semi-lagrangian remap PPM method used by ppmlr (in turn developed from VH1, Blondin et al. 1998) but with an improved Riemann solver, which is derived from the exact solver of Gottlieb and Groth (1988), a significantly faster solution than previous solvers. It has a number of optimisations that have improved the speed so that additional calculations neeed for multi-phase simulations become practical.

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