Category Archives: AAS

Vermeer in DC, just in time for the AAS 231st meeting!

If you are going to the AAS meeting in National Harbor next month, you might consider taking some time to visit the National Gallery of Art for a rare opportunity to view two paintings well-known to Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) fans: Vermeer’s luminous The Astronomer and The Geographer. These paintings, owned by the Louvre and the Städelsches Kunstinstitut respectively, are part of the wonderful Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry exhibit which runs through January 21, 2018 in the West building of the Gallery.

Why are these two paintings well-known to APOD fans? A mashup of these two paintings appeared on APOD’s first birthday on June 16, 1996; note the introduction of a Hubble image for the painting on the wall:

picture combining Vermeer's The Geographer and The Astronomer paintings into one image, with Hubble's Pillars of Creation appearing on the back wall

APOD for June 16, 1996 (with apologies to Vermeer)

On APOD’s 5th birthday, a new composite of these paintings appeared:

picture combining Vermeer's The Geographer and The Astronomer paintings into one image

APOD for June 16, 2000 (with apologies to Vermeer)

Apparently, a tradition was born, and APOD fans started contributing their own takes on these famous images, as seen below in the 10th birthday image, created by Richard Taillet (Univ. de Savoie, LAPTH, LPNHE) and including a few objects that Vermeer’s astronomer never had the opportunity to view.

APOD for June 16, 2006 (with apologies to Vermeer; composite by Richard Taillet)

The next landmark APOD birthdays featured the image that appeared for the 10th birthday, but with a twist: it was pixelated by APOD fan Rob Stevenson using APOD thumbnail images. The image below does not do this justice, so please click through to the larger image housed on the APOD site to see whether you can find your favorite APOD amongst the ones making up this image.

APOD for June 16, 2016 (with apologies to Vermeer; pixelation by Rob Peterson)

To get back to the art exhibit, Vermeer is not the only painter featured in Genre Painting show, nor is his the only astronomer there. The Geographer and The Astronomer appear on one wall with Gerrit Dou’s Astronomer by Candlelight, owned by the Getty Museum, between them. Paintings by other Dutch artists, including Gerard ter Borch, Caspar NetscherPieter de Hooch, and Jan Steen, are also on display. So many Dutch treats! It’s a lovely exhibit and well worth finding your way to the National Gallery.

You will not have to go to the National Gallery of Art to see the APOD editors, however! Jerry Bonnell and Robert Nemiroff are giving a public talk at the AAS meeting at National Harbor; The Year’s Best Astronomy Images will be held on Tuesday, January 9 starting at 7:00 pm in the Gaylord’s Maryland Ballroom D.

Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services Special Session at AAS 231

THURSDAY, 11 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services
10:00 am – 11:30 am
National Harbor 2

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) and Astronomical Data Group at the Flatiron Institute have organized a Special Session at January’s AAS meeting. The session, Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services, will be moderated by Peter Teuben (University of Maryland).

The importance of software to astronomy research is well-established, and excellent arguments to reveal these computational methods to support the research record have been advanced and much discussed in recent years. But what avenues are open to software authors to publish their codes, and what roles and services exist in the community to support their efforts? This session answers these questions. It builds on previous AAS special sessions and brings together a panel of experts to present various avenues for publishing codes and the pros and cons of these avenues, the roles of authors, data editors, and publication indexers in software publication, the benefits of publication to authors and the discipline, and efforts of related community projects to improve aspects of software publication. After the presentations, the floor will be open for discussion and questions. The presenters and topics covered are:

Matteo Cantiello (Flatiron Institute), The Evolution of Software Publication in Astronomy
Chris Lintott (AAS Journals), Software papers and citation in the AAS Journals
Leslie J. Sage (Nature), Software policies and guidelines at Nature
Ramon Khanna (Springer), SpringerNature data and software policies for astrophysics journals
Arfon M. Smith (STScI/JOSS), Journal of Open Source Software (JOSS): Design and first-year review
Karen Collins (Center for Astrophysics), Lessons Learned through the Development and Publication of AstroImageJ
August Muench (AAS Journals), The roles of the AAS Journals’ Data Editors
Alberto Accomazzi (NASA Astrophysics Data System), The role of the ADS in software discovery and citation
Alice Allen (ASCL/UMD), The Astrophysics Source Code Library: Supporting software publication and citation

And you, astro software authors and users, are as always important participants in the discussion. Please come with your questions, observations, and comments; I hope to see you there!

Software events at AAS 231, National Harbor

The Big List o’ Software Stuff for the January AAS meeting is here; it appears software is taking over the world! if I missed anything, please let me know in the comments below. Thank you!


SUNDAY, 7 JANUARY 2018
Workshops
Introduction to Software Carpentry (Day 1), 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM; RiverView Ballroom 2
Hands-on Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling of Cosmic Populations, 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM; Potomac Ballroom 1
Using Python to Search NASA’s Astrophysics Archives, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM; Potomac Ballroom 2


MONDAY, 8 JANUARY 2018
Workshops
Introduction to Software Carpentry (Day 2), 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM; RiverView Ballroom 2
Using Python and Astropy for Astronomical Data Analysis, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM; RiverView Ballroom B
A Data Science Foundation & Roadmap for Astronomy Instructors, 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM; Potomac Ballroom 1


TUESDAY, 9 JANUARY 2018
Splinter meeting: Better Data Visualization and Exploration with GLUE, 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM; National Harbor 8 (Note corrected time!)

Poster presentations

Session 150. Computation, Data Handling, Image Analysis Poster Session (39 posters!)

Also:
157.02. Evolving R Coronae Borealis Stars with MESA
157.07. Modeling Protoplanetary Disks to Characterize the Evolution of their Structure
157.15. Case Study of Data Mining in Observational Astronomy: The Search for New OB Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud
144.12. The evolution of a dead zone in a circumplanetary disk
144.17. Modeling a Large Heterogeneous Set of CIRS Spectra of Titan: The ν4 band of 12C2HD
111.02. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System
111.03. Phase Curve Analysis of Super-Earth 55 Cancri e
111.04. Statistical Analysis of Hubble/WFC3 Transit Spectroscopy of Extrasolar Planets
111.08. Theory and Simulation of Exoplanetary Atmospheric Haze: Giant Spectral Line Broadening
102.02. The Pan-STARRS pipeline and data products
102.03. Precision Photometry and Astrometry from Pan-STARRS
110.01. Resolving the Circumgalactic Medium in the NEPHTHYS Simulations
115.09. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Deep Impact Mission into Comet Tempel 1
151.04. A Transdimensional Approach to Modeling the Cosmic X-ray Background
151.05. The VLITE Post-Processing Pipeline
151.07. OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission Image Analysis
147.03. Impact of Fragtal Grains on Protoplanetary Disk Evolution
147.05. Determining Disk Parameters for the Classical Be Star 59 Cyg
147.06. Modeling Protoplanetary Disks
147.09. Characterizing Protoplanetary Disks in a Young Binary in Orion
147.14. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Protoplanetary Disks with GIZMO
153.06. A Search for Cosmic String Loops Using GADGET-2 Cosmological N-Body Simulator
148.04. 3D hydrodynamic simulations of tidal disruption of terrestrial planets around white dwarfs
148.08. BARTTest: Community-Standard Atmospheric Radiative-Transfer and Retrieval Tests
148.13. Modeled 3-D Biosignatures from the Stratospheres of Proxima Centauri b and M-dwarf Planets
148.14. The Exoplanet Characterization ToolKit (ExoCTK)
148.29. Every Cloud has a Silver Lining: Synthesizing Spectra for Exoplanets with Inhomogeneous Aerosol Coverage
149.22. HERA, Methods of Computational Optimization in search for Epoch of Reionization
149.31. A Phenomenological Model of Star Formation Efficiency in Dark Matter Halos
136.02. Simulations of star-forming molecular clouds: observational predictions
158.10. Simulations of Tidally Driven Formation of Binary Planet Systems
158.11. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence in Cool, Low-Mass Stars: Toward Linking Dynamo Action with Starspots
158.16. The Ultracool Typing Kit – An Open-Source, Qualitative Spectral Typing GUI for L Dwarfs
146.01. Binary Model for the Heartbeat Star System KIC 4142768
145.05. Modeling and Analysis of CTIO 1.5m White Dwarf Spectra

Oral presentations

111.02. Dynamical Studies of N-Body Gravity and Tidal Dissipation in the TRAPPIST-1 Star System, 10:10 AM – 10:20 AM, National Harbor 11
111.03. Phase Curve Analysis of Super-Earth 55 Cancri e, 10:20 AM – 10:30 AM, National Harbor 11
111.04. Statistical Analysis of Hubble/WFC3 Transit Spectroscopy of Extrasolar Planets, 10:30 AM – 10:40 AM, National Harbor 11
111.08. Theory and Simulation of Exoplanetary Atmospheric Haze: Giant Spectral Line Broadening, 11:20 AM – 11:30 AM, National Harbor 11
102.02. The Pan-STARRS pipeline and data products, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM, Potomac C
102.03. Precision Photometry and Astrometry from Pan-STARRS, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM, Potomac C
110.01. Resolving the Circumgalactic Medium in the NEPHTHYS Simulations, 10:00 AM – 10:10 AM, National Harbor 10
115.06. The Deflector Selector: A Machine Learning Framework for Prioritizing Hazardous Object Deflection Technology Development, 10:50 AM – 11:00 AM, Potomac 1-2
115.09. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Deep Impact Mission into Comet Tempel 1, 1:20 AM – 11:30 AM, Potomac 1-2
116.01. SVD/MCMC Data Analysis Pipeline for Global Redshifted 21-cm Spectrum Observations of the Cosmic Dawn and Dark Ages, 12:00 PM – 3:30 PM; Woodrow Wilson BCD
128.04. Dynamics as a ‘Red Flag’ in Exoplanetary Science, 2:40 PM – 2:50 PM, National Harbor 11
132.07. Time-Dependent Electron Acceleration in Pulsar Wind Termination Shocks: Application the 2011 April Crab Nebula Gamma-ray Flare, 3:20 PM – 3:30 PM, Potomac 3-4


WEDNESDAY, 10 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Applied Statistical Methods in Astronomy: Gaussian Processes and Machine Learning
2:00 PM – 3:30 PM; National Harbor 2

Poster presentations
Session 239: Applied Statistical Methods in Astronomy: Gaussian Processes and Machine Learning Poster Session

Also:
257.09. Exploring the Internal Dynamics of Globular Clusters
257.11. GalMod: the last frontier of Galaxy population synthesis models
257.22. TYCHO: Simulating Exoplanets Within Stellar Clusters
244.09. The COBAIN (COntact Binary Atmospheres with INterpolation) Code for Radiative Transfer
244.22. Modeling the binary circumstellar medium of Type IIb/L/n supernova progenitors
244.23. Photometric Analysis and Modeling of Five Mass-Transferring Binary Systems
244.26. A Global Three-Dimensional Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulation of a Self-Gravitating Accretion Disk
238.05. The Chandra Source Catalog 2.0: Data Processing Pipelines
246.03. An accessible echelle pipeline and its application to a binary star
246.04. Building Better Planet Populations for EXOSIMS
246.16. Improvements to the Root Finding Algorithm in VBBinaryLensing
258.16. Epoch of Reionization : An Investigation of the Semi-Analytic 21CMMC Code
252.12. Using numerical simulations to study the ICM metallicity fields in clusters and groups
255.01. SkyPlotter: Displaying Source Candidates Near High-Energy Neutrino Events
255.02. A new relativistic model for tidal stream evolution during tidal disruption events
255.05. Modeling Ponderomotive Squeezed Light in Gravitational-Wave Laser Interferometers
255.17. Data Analysis Techniques for LIGO Detector Characterization
243.11. Applying a physical continuum model to describe the broadband X-ray spectra of accreting pulsars at high luminosity
237.03. New Algorithm Identifies Tidal Streams Oriented Along our Line-of-Sight

Oral presentations
Session 213: Computation, Data Science, and Image Analysis 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM; National Harbor 4 (7 presentations)

Also:
211.07. Bayesian Analysis of Hot Jupiter Radius Anomalies Points to Ohmic Dissipation, 11:10 AM – 11:20 AM, National Harbor 11
210.06. Figuring Out Gas in Galaxies In Enzo (FOGGIE): Resolving the Inner Circumgalactic Medium, 11:10 AM – 11:20 AM, National Harbor 10
229.03. Forward modelling techniques for spectra retrieval of circumstellar debris disks, 2:30 PM – 2:40 PM, Potomac 5-6
226.03. Cosmological Simulations with Molecular Astrochemistry: Water in the Early Universe, 2:30 PM – 2:40 PM, National Harbor 3
228.05. pyLIMA : The first open source microlensing modeling software, 2:50 PM – 3:00 PM, National Harbor 11


THURSDAY, 11 JANUARY 2018
Special Session: Astronomy Software Publishing: Community Roles and Services, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, National Harbor 2
Plenary Talk: Astro Data Science: The Next Generation, 11:40 AM – 12:30 PM; Potomac Ballroom AB

Poster presentations
350.01. Looking for Dust-Scattering Light Echoes
350.03. Studying Dust Scattering Halos with Galactic X-ray Binaries
350.05. Markov Chain Models for Stochastic Behavior in Resonance Overlap Regions
340.13. Simulating Supernovae Driven Outflows in Dwarf Galaxies
355.27. Stellar Atmospheric Modelling for the ACCESS Program
351.02. Calculating the n-point correlation function with general and efficient python code
348.12. A Comparison of Mixing in Stellar Evolution Codes Tycho and Geneva
362.08. What Time is Your Sunset? Accounting for Refraction in Sunrise/set Prediction Models
362.09. SpecTracer: A Python-Based Interactive Solution for Echelle Spectra Reduction
362.11. Generative Models in Deep Learning: Constraints for Galaxy Evolution
362.16. Statistical tools for analysis and modeling of cosmic populations and astronomical time series: CUDAHM and TSE
338.04. Simulating nanostorm heating in coronal loops using hydrodynamics and non-thermal particle evolution
338.06. Modeling Solar Atmospheric Phenomena with AtomDB and PyAtomDB

Oral presentations
334.01. Modeling the photo-polarimetric characteristics of brown dwarfs, 2:00 PM – 2:10 PM, Maryland 1-2
334.04. 3D Realistic Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Moderate-Mass Star: Effects of Rotation, 2:40 PM – 2:50 PM, Maryland 1-2


FRIDAY, 12 JANUARY 2018
Workshop: Hack Together Day, 10:00 am ‐ 7:00 pm, National Harbor 13 (Info and registration)

Special Session: Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy (ASTRO): SAMSI 2016-17, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, Grapevine 2

Poster presentations
434.08. Modeling the Effects of Asynchronous Rotation on Secondary Eclipse Timings in HW VIr Binaries
436.05. Real-time Automatic Search for Multi-wavelength Counterparts of DWF Transient
436.16. CosmoQuest Transient Tracker: Opensource Photometry & Astrometry software
437.04. Impact of Ice on Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks and Formation of Planetary Systems
438.02. Tests of Catastrophic Outlier Prediction in Empirical Photometric Redshift Estimation with Redshift Probability Distributions
438.04. Confronting Alternative Cosmological Models with the Highest-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae
439.09. TESS Data Processing and Quick-look Pipeline
439.10. PyKE3: data analysis tools for NASA’s Kepler, K2, and TESS missions
439.18. Open-source Software for Exoplanet Atmospheric Modeling
439.22. Gaussian Process Noise Modeling with RadVel: a Case Study of HD 3167
439.23. Developing Tighter Constraints on Exoplanet Biosignatures by Modeling Atmospheric Haze
440.12. The Effects of Accretion Disk Thickness on the Black Hole Reflection Spectrum
441.03. Large Scale Structure in CHILES using DisPerSE
444.13. Teaching Astronomy and Computation with Gaia: A New Curriculum for an Extra-curricular High School Program
447.12. The Data Calibration Pipeline for JWST/NIRSpec
448.02. Kinematics of Globular Cluster: new Perspectives of Energy Equipartition from N-body Simulations
448.05. Improved Membership Probability for Moving Groups: Bayesian and Machine Learning Approaches
449.10. Employing Machine-Learning Methods to Study Young Stellar Objects
453.09. PINT, A Modern Software Package for Pulsar Timing
428.03. Identifying Likely Disk-hosting M dwarfs with Disk Detective
426.07. Observing Galaxy Mergers in Simulations
426.08. A new 3-D View of Ionized Gas Conditions in Galaxies
424.01. Constraining Population Synthesis Models of Compact Binary Mergers using Supernova Observations

Oral presentations
405.04. Radiation Transport in Dynamic Spacetimes, 10:40 AM – 10:50 AM, Maryland C
412.02.D Illuminating the star clusters and satellite galaxies with multi-scale baryonic simulations, 10:10 AM – 10:30 AM, National Harbor 4
406.01. Phase-space Analysis in the Group and Cluster Environment: Introduction and Application, 10:00 AM – 10:10 AM, Maryland D
406.05. Gas Dynamics in the Fornax Cluster: Viscosity, turbulence, and sloshing, 11:00 AM – 11:10 AM, Maryland D
409.04D. A Modern Picture of Barred Galaxy Dynamics, 10:40 AM – 11:00 AM, National Harbor 10
408.03D. Multidimensional pair-instability supernova simulations and their multi-messenger signals, 10:20 AM – 10:40 AM, National Harbor 3

Also of likely interest is the oral presentation on “Big Data” Teen Astronomy Cafes at NOAO that will take place on Wednesday, 10 January from 10:10 AM – 10:20 AM in Maryland 1-2.

 

ASCL poster at AAS #229

With 1,400 codes, the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) is the largest indexed resource for codes used in astronomy research in existence. This free online registry was established in 1999, is indexed by Web of Science and ADS, and is citable, with citations to its entries tracked by ADS. Registering your code with the ASCL is easy with our online submissions system. Making your software available for examination shows confidence in your research and makes your research more transparent, reproducible, and falsifiable. ASCL registration allows your software to be cited on its own merits and provides a citation that is trackable and accepted by all astronomy journals and journals such as Science and Nature. Registration also allows others to find your code more easily. This presentation covers the benefits of registering astronomy research software with the ASCL.

Alice Allen, Astrophysics Source Code Library
Kimberly DuPrie, Space Telescope Science Institute
G. Bruce Berriman, IPAC, Caltech
Jessica D. Mink, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Robert J. Nemiroff, Michigan Technological University
Thomas Robitaille, Freelance
Judy Schmidt, Astrophysics Source Code Library
Lior Shamir, Lawrence Technological University
Keith Shortridge, Knave and Varlet
Peter J. Teuben, University of Maryland
John F. Wallin, Middle Tennessee State University
Rein Warmels, European Southern Observatory

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Perspectives in Research Software Special Session at AAS 229

FRIDAY, 6 JANUARY 2017
Special Session: Perspectives in Research Software: Education, Funding, Reproducibility, Citation, and Impact
10:00 am – 11:30 am
Grapevine 2

The Moore-Sloan Data Science Environment at NYU and the ASCL have organized a Special Session at January’s AAS. The session, Perspectives in Research Software: Education, Funding, Reproducibility, Citation, and Impact, will be moderated by Bruce Berriman (IPAC, Caltech/Astronomy Computing Today). The session will feature short presentations and will include a discussion period with the floor open for questions and comments, and maybe even a few answers, too. The topics and presenters are :

Tracy Teal (Data Carpentry), Software not as a service
Michael Hucka (Caltech), Finding the right wheel when you don’t want to reinvent it
Lior Shamir (LTU), Reproducibility and reusability of scientific software
Ivelina Momcheva (STScI), Funding research software development
Heather Piwowar (ImpactStory), Capturing the impact of software
David W. Hogg (NYU), The relationships between software publications and software systems
Alice Allen (ASCL), Update on research software citation efforts

That last speaker looks a wee bit dodgy, but the moderator and other panelists are aces! And you, software authors and users, are as always important participants in the discussion. I hope to see you there!

Software events at AAS 229, Grapevine

And here it is: the Big List o’ Software Stuff at next month’s AAS meeting. If I missed anything, please let me know in the comments below; thanks!


TUESDAY, 3 JANUARY 2017
Workshops
Introduction to Software Carpentry, 8:00 am ‐ 5:30 pm, Appaloosa 1
Using Python for Astronomical Data Analysis, 8:30 am ‐ 5:00 pm, Texas C


WEDNESDAY, 4 JANUARY 2017
Splinter meeting: Flexible Multi‐dimensional Modeling of Complex Data in Astronomy, 9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am, Grapevine 4

Poster presentations
146.04 Gemini Planet Imager Calibrations, Pipeline Updates, and Campaign Data Process
146.07 Reprocessing of Archival Direct Imaging Data of Herbig Ae/Be Stars
146.13 Finding Planets in K2: A New Method of Cleaning the Data
146.17. Searching for Wide, Planetary-Mass Companions in Archival Spitzer/IRAC Data
154.25 Automated Detection of Dwarf Galaxies and Star Clusters in SMASH through the NOAO Data Lab
154.27 On the Quantification of Incertitude in Astrophysical Simulation Codes
155.13 Spectro-spatial reconstruction of Wide Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) data

Oral presentations
Testing SMBH scaling relations using cosmological simulations and optical/near-IR imaging data, 10:00 am – 10:20 am, Grapevine C
An Empirical Examination of the NEOWISE Results and Data analysis, 10:50 am – 11:00 am, Texas 4
Data Simulation for 21 cm Cosmology Experiments, 2:40 pm – 2:50 pm, Grapevine C


THURSDAY, 5 JANUARY 2017
Poster presentations
Session 236: Computation, Data Handling, Image Analysis & Light Pollution (21 posters)

239.03, The era of synoptic galactic archeology: using HST and Chandra observations to constrain the evolution of elliptical galaxies through the spatial distribution of globular clusters and X-ray binaries
244.05, Three-Dimensional Simulations of the Convective Urca Process in Pre-Supernova White Dwarfs

Oral presentations
Mind the Gap when Data Mining the Ritter-Kolb Cataclysmic Variable Catalogue, 10:00 am – 10:10 am, Fort Worth 6
What drives the kinematic evolution of star-forming galaxies? 10:20 am – 10:30 am, Grapevine 2
Simulating Galactic Winds on Supercomputers, 2:50 pm – 3:10 pm, Grapevine A
Photometric Redshifts for High Resolution Radio Galaxies in the SuperCLASS Field, 3:10 pm – 3:20 PM, Grapevine A


FRIDAY, 6 JANUARY 2017
Special Session: Perspectives in Research Software: Education, Funding, Reproducibility, Citation, and Impact, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, Grapevine 2

Poster presentations
335.05, When Will It Be …?: U.S. Naval Observatory Religious Calendar Computers Expanded
336.09, Variable Stars as an Introduction to Computational Research
345.03, An ALMA Survey of Planet Forming Disks in Rho Ophiuchus
345.19, Chemistry of protostellar envelopes and disks: computational testing of 2D abundances
348.06, Computing Architecture for the ngVLA

Oral presentations
K2 red giant asteroseismology using Bayesian Asteroseismology data Modeling (BAM), 10:24 am – 10:36 am, Grapevine B
Upgrades to MINERVA control software, 2:00 pm – 2:10 pm, Texas D


SATURDAY, 7 JANUARY 2017
Special Session: Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy (ASTRO): SAMSI 2016-17, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, Grapevine 2

Workshop: Hack Together Day, 10:00 am ‐ 7:00 pm, Grapevine 4 (Info and registration)

Also of likely interest is the Special Session on The Value of Astronomical Data and Long Term Preservation that will take place on Thursday, 4 January from 10:00 am – 11:30 am in Texas 3.

 

First look at software activities at AAS 229

Though we have a way to go before January’s AAS meeting (and ADASS and OpenCon on the ASCL’s schedule coming up sooner), a look at the schedule for the AAS meeting already shows multiple options for the computationally-inclined astronomer. I’m very excited about the Special Session we’ve organized with the Moore-Sloan DSE, called Perspectives in Research Software. Bruce Berriman (IPAC, Caltech/Astronomy Computing Today) will moderate the session. In keeping with previous sessions, the session will include a discussion period with the floor open for questions and comments; we want to hear what you have to say. We have a panel of seven speakers; the presenters and topics are:

Tracy Teal (Data Carpentry), Software not as a service
Michael Hucka (Caltech), Finding the right wheel when you don’t want to reinvent it
Lior Shamir (LTU), Reproducibility and reusability of scientific software
Ivelina Momcheva (STScI), Funding research software development
Heather Piwowar (ImpactStory), Capturing the impact of software
David W. Hogg (NYU), The relationships between software publications and software systems
And me, Update on research software citation efforts

I hope to see you there!

Other software events that have shown up so far on the AAS schedule are listed below. Good times coming!

Tuesday, 3 January 2017
Workshop: Introduction to Software Carpentry, 8:00 am ‐ 5:30 pm
Workshop: Using Python for Astronomical Data Analysis, 8:00 am ‐ 4:30 pm

Wednesday, 4 January 2017
Splinter Meeting: Flexible Multi‐dimensional Modeling of Complex Data in Astronomy, 9:30 am ‐ 11:30 am

Friday, 6 January 2017
Special Session: Perspectives in Research Software: Education, Funding, Reproducibility, Citation, and Impact, 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Saturday, 7 January 2017
Special Session: Statistical, Mathematical and Computational Methods for Astronomy (ASTRO): SAMSI 2016-17, 10:00 am – 11:30 am
Workshop: Hack Together Day, 10:00 am ‐ 7:00 pm

Also of likely interest is the Special Session on The Value of Astronomical Data and Long Term Preservation that will take place on Thursday, 4 January from 10:00 am – 11:30 am.

 

Upcoming events and sessions, Fall-Winter 2016/7

I’ll be representing the ASCL at next month’s WSSSPE4 meeting in Manchester, and in October, the ASCL will be at ADASS XXVI and will hold an Advisory Committee (AC) meeting while there. Peter Teuben, chair of the ASCL AC, will moderate a Birds of a Feather session at ADASS on Implementing Ideas for Improving Software Citation and Credit; this is a follow-up on the discussion at last year’s BoF Improving Software Citation and Creditwith a goal of taking action on some of the ideas generated at last year’s BoF. Watch this space in October for more!

For January’s American Astronomy Society meeting in Texas, the Moore-Sloan Data Science Environment at NYU and the ASCL have organized another Special Session, Perspectives in Research Software. This will follow the format of previous sessions, with presentations in the first half of the session and discussion open to all for the second half. Bruce Berriman from the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech will moderate; the presenters include Ivelina Momcheva (Space Telescope Science Institute),  Tracy Teal (Data Carpentry), Lior Shamir (Lawrence Technological University), and Michael Hucka (Caltech). I’m rationally exuberant about this session!

AAS 227 Poster 348.01: Making your code citable with the Astrophysics Source Code Library

Image of poster on ASCL showing how it can be used to cite software and get currently untrackable DOIs tracked in ADS

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research. With nearly 1,200 codes, it is the largest indexed resource for astronomy codes in existence. Established in 1999, it offers software authors a path to citation of their research codes even without publication of a paper describing the software, and offers scientists a way to find codes used in refereed publications, thus improving the transparency of the research. Citations using ASCL IDs are accepted by major astronomy journals and if formatted properly are tracked by ADS and other indexing services. The number of citations to ASCL entries increased sharply from 110 citations in January 2014 to 456 citations in September 2015. The percentage of code entries in ASCL that were cited at least once rose from 7.5% in January 2014 to 17.4% in September 2015. The ASCL’s mid-2014 infrastructure upgrade added an easy entry submission form, more flexible browsing, search capabilities, and an RSS feeder for updates. A Changes/Additions form added this past fall lets authors submit links for papers that use their codes for addition to the ASCL entry even if those papers don’t formally cite the codes, thus increasing the transparency of that research and capturing the value of their software to the community.

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AAS 227 Poster 247.07: Astronomy Education and the Astrophysics Source Code Library

Image of ASCL education poster

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is an online registry of source codes used in refereed astrophysics research. It currently lists nearly 1,200 codes and covers all aspects of computational astrophysics. How can this resource be of use to educators and to the graduate students they mentor? The ASCL serves as a discovery tool for codes that can be used for one’s own research. Graduate students can also investigate existing codes to see how common astronomical problems are approached numerically in practice, and use these codes as benchmarks for their own solutions to these problems. Further, they can deepen their knowledge of software practices and techniques through examination of others’ codes.

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