Category Archives: codes

February and March 2019 additions to the ASCL

Twelve codes were added to the ASCL in February, 2019:

dyPolyChord: Super fast dynamic nested sampling with PolyChord
ExPRES: Exoplanetary and Planetary Radio Emissions Simulator
GraviDy: Gravitational Dynamics
LiveData: Data reduction pipeline

LPNN: Limited Post-Newtonian N-body code for collisionless self-gravitating systems
PINT: High-precision pulsar timing analysis package
PyMF: Matched filtering techniques for astronomical images
Radynversion: Solar atmospheric properties during a solar flare

RPFITS: Routines for reading and writing RPFITS files
SNTD: Supernova Time Delays
Specutils: Spectroscopic analysis and reduction
SpecViz: 1D Spectral Visualization Tool

And sixteen codes were added to the ASCL in March, 2019:

allesfitter: Flexible star and exoplanet inference from photometry and radial velocity
AsPy: Aspherical fluctuations on the spherical collapse background
brutifus: A Python module to post-process datacubes from integral field spectrographs
DAVE: Discovery And Vetting of K2 Exoplanets

GalIMF: Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function
Galmag: Computing realistic galactic magnetic fields
HelioPy: Heliospheric and planetary physics library
ICSF: Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

NFWdist: Density, distribution function, quantile function and random generation for the 3D NFW profile
NIFTy5: Numerical Information Field Theory v5
PLATON: PLanetary Atmospheric Transmission for Observer Noobs
PRF: Probabilistic Random Forest

SimSpin: Kinematic analysis of galaxy simulations
SIXTE: Simulation of X-ray Telescopes
SPICE: Observation Geometry System for Space Science Missions
SpiceyPy: Python wrapper for the NAIF C SPICE Toolkit

January 2019 additions to the ASCL

Twelve codes were added to the ASCL in January, 2019:

bettermoments: Line-of-sight velocity calculation
Bilby: Bayesian inference library
CCL: Core Cosmology Library
cFE: Core Flight Executive

eddy: Extracting Disk DYnamics
Galaxia_wrap: Galaxia wrapper for generating mock stellar surveys
OCFit: Python package for fitting of O-C diagrams
Photon: Python tool for data plotting

SEDobs: Observational spectral energy distribution simulation
ssos: Solar system objects detection pipeline
stellarWakes: Dark matter subhalo searches using stellar kinematic data
unwise_psf: PSF models for unWISE coadds

December 2018 additions to the ASCL

Eighteen codes were added to the ASCL in December 2018:

aesop: ARC Echelle Spectroscopic Observation Pipeline
AUTOSPEC: Automated Spectral Extraction Software for integral field unit data cubes
distlink: Minimum orbital intersection distance (MOID) computation library
easyaccess: SQL command line interpreter for astronomical surveys
ExoGAN: Exoplanets Generative Adversarial Network

Fermipy: Fermi-LAT data analysis package
galclassify: Stellar classifications using a galactic population synthesis model
GENGA: Gravitational ENcounters with Gpu Acceleration
GLADIS: GLobal Accretion Disk Instability Simulation
GRAND-HOD: GeneRalized ANd Differentiable Halo Occupation Distribution

Juliet: Transiting and non-transiting exoplanetary systems modelling tool
Lightkurve: Kepler and TESS time series analysis in Python
OctApps: Octave functions for continuous gravitational-wave data analysis
PFANT: Stellar spectral synthesis code
psrqpy: Python module to query the ATNF pulsar catalogue

PynPoint 0.6.0: Pipeline for processing and analysis of high-contrast imaging data
SPAMCART: Smoothed PArticle Monte CArlo Radiative Transfer
WISP: Wenger Interferometry Software Package

ASCL tags and finding software in ADS

The ASCL makes it easy to cite the software astro research depends on. Every astronomy journal and many others such as Science and Nature accept ASCL references; ADS shows citations to ASCL entries from nearly 90 journals. Citations to ASCL entries are tracked by ADS, Web of Science, and other indices.

bar chart showing citations to ASCL entries per year as of December 5, 2018, with the 2018 bar labeled with 1,161 citations
Citations to ASCL entries from ADS as of 12/05/2018

ADS makes it easy to search for software in its holdings through the use of the “software” doctype.
Image of the ADS Bumblebee query box with the search term doctype:software in it

ASCL has started tagging NASA software among its entries, allowing you to search ASCL and ADS for this software.
ADS bumblebee query field showing search terms doctype:software keyword:nasa
Screenshot showing entries in ASCL with the NASA keyword

You can find the tags on an entry below the “Discuss” button.Partial screenshot of Kadenza code entry with a red arrow indication the location of the keywords

Citation information and other statistics, such as the number of site links we most recently checked, when we checked them, and how many are healthy, appear on our dashboard, which is updated on Tuesdays and Fridays.
Partial screenshot of dashboard showing 3382 site links (96.77%) are working as of 2018-12-04 03:57:42. Statistics: There are 1833 codes in the ASCL, and 24 submitted. There are 2847 citations to ASCL entries in ADS. 1833 (100.00%) ASCL codes are in ADS. 584 (31.86%) have ADS citations. Bar charts of code additions by year and citations by year
If you have any questions about citing ASCL entries, we’re happy to help! Email editor@ascl.net or tweet to @asclnet.

November 2018 additions to the ASCL

Twenty codes were added to the ASCL in November 2018:

binaryBHexp: On-the-fly visualizations of precessing binary black holes
DiskSim: Modeling Accretion Disk Dynamics with SPH
DRAGONS: Gemini Observatory data reduction platform
Flame: Near-infrared and optical spectroscopy data reduction pipeline
gdr2_completeness: GaiaDR2 data retrieval and manipulation

MillCgs: Searching for Compact Groups in the Millennium Simulation
muLAn: gravitational MICROlensing Analysis Software
PENTACLE: Large-scale particle simulations code for planet formation
PulsarHunter: Searching for and confirming pulsars
pygad: Analysing Gadget Simulations with Python

Pylians: Python libraries for the analysis of numerical simulations
QuickSip: Project survey image properties onto the sky into Healpix maps
radon: Streak detection using the Fast Radon Transform
RLOS: Time-resolved imaging of model astrophysical jets
SEP: Source Extraction and Photometry

Shark: Flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model
SIM5: Library for ray-tracing and radiation transport in general relativity
synphot: Synthetic photometry using Astropy
VoigtFit: Absorption line fitting for Voigt profiles
Vplanet: Virtual planet simulator

October 2018 additions to the ASCL

Twenty-one codes were added to the ASCL in October 2018:

APPLawD: Accurate Potentials in Power Law Disks
ARTES: 3D Monte Carlo scattering radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres
Barcode: Bayesian reconstruction of cosmic density fields
catsHTM: Catalog cross-matching tool
cuFFS: CUDA-accelerated Fast Faraday Synthesis

DDS: Debris Disk Radiative Transfer Simulator
Echelle++: Generic spectrum simulator
Eclairs: Efficient Codes for the LArge scales of the unIveRSe
Firefly: Interactive exploration of particle-based data
galfast: Milky Way mock catalog generator

GiRaFFE: General relativistic force-free electrodynamics code
JETGET: Hydrodynamic jet simulation visualization and analysis
MIEX: Mie scattering code for large grains
ODTBX: Orbit Determination Toolbox
pycraf: Spectrum-management compatibility

PyUltraLight: Pseudo-spectral Python code to compute ultralight dark matter dynamics
SOPHISM: Software Instrument Simulator
STARRY: Analytic computation of occultation light curves
STiC: Stockholm inversion code
VaeX: Visualization and eXploration of Out-of-Core DataFrames

XCLASS: eXtended CASA Line Analysis Software Suite

Using the ASCL for education

The Astronomy Department at the University of Maryland (College Park) offers a one-credit astronomy scientific computing class, ASTR 288P: Introduction to Astronomical Programming, to provide undergraduates with a foundation in computing. This course is a prerequisite to an advanced-level three-credit course on Computational Astrophysics (ASTR 415).

In ASTR 288P, students learn to work with the UNIX terminal, get the basics of coding with Python and some C, and learn what makefiles are and how to install software, among other topics. The course also introduces students to the ASCL, as for the final class project, students (either alone or in pairs) pick a code from the ASCL, give a short presentation on how they installed and used it, and discuss how that code fits in the large scheme of computing in astrophysics. This allows the students to get a feel for the computational work the astro community is doing and is a good match to test the skills they should have learned in the class.

Increasing the visibility of NASA software

Until this week, a search in ADS for doctype:”software” keyword:”NASA” returned zero results. NASA has funded the ASCL to make its astronomy research software discoverable in ASCL and ADS. This required changes to the ASCL structure and the ADS data feed, and edits to some current records; it also entails mining various NASA software sites for codes that meet the ASCL’s criteria and creating appropriately tagged entries for them. In the first phase of the project, started in July, our wonderful developer Judy Schmidt (@SpaceGeck) worked her magic on our infrastructure, keywords have been added to some existing records, and ADS has ingested the first entries we’ve tagged with the NASA keyword. We can now see first results from this two-year project:

ADS search results for NASA software with 43 records
Additional changes will be coming to the ASCL in the coming months as we continue this funded work. We love this project; at its core, it’s a simple concept, and leverages existing resources (ADS, various NASA code sites, and ASCL) to make research software more discoverable and provides information about NASA software that was not readily available before. It furthers the excellent work NASA has been doing to release software, demonstrates yet another value of ADS (which has many superpowers!), and makes the ASCL more useful, too.

September 2018 additions to the ASCL

Sixteen codes were added to the ASCL in September 2018:

dynesty: Dynamic Nested Sampling package
Isca: Idealized global circulation modeling
LEMON: Differential photometry pipeline
MrMoose: Multi-Resolution Multi-Object/Origin Spectral Energy distribution fitting procedure

NEBULA: Radiative transfer code of ionized nebulae at radio wavelengths
nestcheck: Nested sampling calculations analysis
PASTA: Python Astronomical Stacking Tool Array
PCCDPACK: Polarimetry with CCD

perfectns: “Perfect” dynamic and standard nested sampling for spherically symmetric likelihoods and priors
PyQSOFit: Python code to fit the spectrum of quasars
qp: Quantile parametrization for probability distribution functions
RequiSim: Variance weighted overlap calculator

spops: Spinning black-hole binary population synthesis
stepped_luneburg: Stacked-based ray tracing code to model a stepped Luneburg lens
surfinBH: Surrogate final black hole properties for mergers of binary black holes
VBBINARYLENSING: Microlensing light-curve computation

August 2018 additions to the ASCL

Eleven codes were added to the ASCL in August 2018:

2DSF: Vectorized Structure Function Algorithm
Barycorrpy: Barycentric velocity calculation and leap second management
CPF: Corral Pipeline Framework
Fips: An OpenGL based FITS viewer
hfof: Friends-of-Friends via spatial hashing

hi_class: Horndeski in the Cosmic Linear Anisotropy Solving System
ImPlaneIA: Image Plane Approach to Interferometric Analysis
py-sdm: Support Distribution Machines
PyMieDap: Python Mie Doubling Adding Program
Robbie: Radio transients and variables detection workflow

rsigma: Resonant disturbance