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[ascl:1511.017] DES exposure checker: Dark Energy Survey image quality control crowdsourcer

DES exposure checker renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes, thus allowing image quality control for the Dark Energy Survey to be crowdsourced through its web application. Users can also generate custom labels to help identify previously unknown problem classes; generated reports are fed back to hardware and software experts to help mitigate and eliminate recognized issues. These problem reports allow rapid correction of artifacts that otherwise may be too subtle or infrequent to be recognized.

[ascl:1904.009] deproject: Deprojection of two-dimensional annular X-ray spectra

Deproject extends Sherpa (ascl:1107.005) to facilitate deprojection of two-dimensional annular X-ray spectra to recover the three-dimensional source properties. For typical thermal models, this includes the radial temperature and density profiles. This basic method is used for X-ray cluster analysis and is the basis for the XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) model project. The deproject module is written in Python and is straightforward to use and understand. The basic physical assumption of deproject is that the extended source emissivity is constant and optically thin within spherical shells whose radii correspond to the annuli used to extract the specta. Given this assumption, one constructs a model for each annular spectrum that is a linear volume-weighted combination of shell models.

[ascl:1705.003] demc2: Differential evolution Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimator

demc2, also abbreviated as DE-MCMC, is a differential evolution Markov Chain parameter estimation library written in R for adaptive MCMC on real parameter spaces.

[ascl:1602.012] DELightcurveSimulation: Light curve simulation code

DELightcurveSimulation simulates light curves with any given power spectral density and any probability density function, following the algorithm described in Emmanoulopoulos et al. (2013). The simulated products have exactly the same variability and statistical properties as the observed light curves. The code is a Python implementation of the Mathematica code provided by Emmanoulopoulos et al.

[ascl:1011.012] DEFROST: A New Code for Simulating Preheating after Inflation

At the end of inflation, dynamical instability can rapidly deposit the energy of homogeneous cold inflaton into excitations of other fields. This process, known as preheating, is rather violent, inhomogeneous and non-linear, and has to be studied numerically. This paper presents a new code for simulating scalar field dynamics in expanding universe written for that purpose. Compared to available alternatives, it significantly improves both the speed and the accuracy of calculations, and is fully instrumented for 3D visualization. We reproduce previously published results on preheating in simple chaotic inflation models, and further investigate non-linear dynamics of the inflaton decay. Surprisingly, we find that the fields do not want to thermalize quite the way one would think. Instead of directly reaching equilibrium, the evolution appears to be stuck in a rather simple but quite inhomogeneous state. In particular, one-point distribution function of total energy density appears to be universal among various two-field preheating models, and is exceedingly well described by a lognormal distribution. It is tempting to attribute this state to scalar field turbulence.

[ascl:1405.004] Defringeflat: Fringe pattern removal

The IDL package Defringeflat identifies and removes fringe patterns from images such as spectrograph flat fields. It uses a wavelet transform to calculate the frequency spectrum in a region around each point of a one-dimensional array. The wavelet transform amplitude is reconstructed from (smoothed) parameters obtaining the fringe's wavelet transform, after which an inverse wavelet transform is performed to obtain the computed fringe pattern which is then removed from the flat.

[ascl:1805.029] DeepMoon: Convolutional neural network trainer to identify moon craters

DeepMoon trains a convolutional neural net using data derived from a global digital elevation map (DEM) and catalog of craters to recognize craters on the Moon. The TensorFlow-based pipeline code is divided into three parts. The first generates a set images of the Moon randomly cropped from the DEM, with corresponding crater positions and radii. The second trains a convnet using this data, and the third validates the convnet's predictions.

[ascl:1603.015] Dedalus: Flexible framework for spectrally solving differential equations

Dedalus solves differential equations using spectral methods. It implements flexible algorithms to solve initial-value, boundary-value, and eigenvalue problems with broad ranges of custom equations and spectral domains. Its primary features include symbolic equation entry, multidimensional parallelization, implicit-explicit timestepping, and flexible analysis with HDF5. The code is written primarily in Python and features an easy-to-use interface. The numerical algorithm produces highly sparse systems for many equations which are efficiently solved using compiled libraries and MPI.

[ascl:1801.006] DecouplingModes: Passive modes amplitudes

DecouplingModes calculates the amplitude of the passive modes, which requires solving the Einstein equations on superhorizon scales sourced by the anisotropic stress from the magnetic fields (prior to neutrino decoupling), and the magnetic and neutrino stress (after decoupling). The code is available as a Mathematica notebook.

[ascl:1501.005] DECA: Decomposition of images of galaxies

DECA performs photometric analysis of images of disk and elliptical galaxies having a regular structure. It is written in Python and combines the capabilities of several widely used packages for astronomical data processing such as IRAF, SExtractor, and the GALFIT code to perform two-dimensional decomposition of galaxy images into several photometric components (bulge+disk). DECA can be applied to large samples of galaxies with different orientations with respect to the line of sight (including edge-on galaxies) and requires minimum human intervention.

[ascl:1510.004] DEBiL: Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter

DEBiL rapidly fits a large number of light curves to a simple model. It is the central component of a pipeline for systematically identifying and analyzing eclipsing binaries within a large dataset of light curves; the results of DEBiL can be used to flag light curves of interest for follow-up analysis.

[ascl:0008.001] DDSCAT: The discrete dipole approximation for scattering and absorption of light by irregular particles

DDSCAT is a freely available software package which applies the "discrete dipole approximation" (DDA) to calculate scattering and absorption of electromagnetic waves by targets with arbitrary geometries and complex refractive index. The DDA approximates the target by an array of polarizable points. DDSCAT.5a requires that these polarizable points be located on a cubic lattice. DDSCAT allows accurate calculations of electromagnetic scattering from targets with "size parameters" 2 pi a/lambda < 15 provided the refractive index m is not large compared to unity (|m-1| < 1). The DDSCAT package is written in Fortran and is highly portable. The program supports calculations for a variety of target geometries (e.g., ellipsoids, regular tetrahedra, rectangular solids, finite cylinders, hexagonal prisms, etc.). Target materials may be both inhomogeneous and anisotropic. It is straightforward for the user to import arbitrary target geometries into the code, and relatively straightforward to add new target generation capability to the package. DDSCAT automatically calculates total cross sections for absorption and scattering and selected elements of the Mueller scattering intensity matrix for specified orientation of the target relative to the incident wave, and for specified scattering directions. This User Guide explains how to use DDSCAT to carry out EM scattering calculations. CPU and memory requirements are described.

[ascl:1810.020] DDS: Debris Disk Radiative Transfer Simulator

DDS simulates scattered light and thermal reemission in arbitrary optically dust distributions with spherical, homogeneous grains where the dust parameters (optical properties, sublimation temperature, grain size) and SED of the illuminating/ heating radiative source can be arbitrarily defined. The code is optimized for studying circumstellar debris disks where large grains (i.e., with large size parameters) are expected to determine the far-infrared through millimeter dust reemission spectral energy distribution. The approach to calculate dust temperatures and dust reemission spectra is only valid in the optically thin regime. The validity of this constraint is verified for each model during the runtime of the code. The relative abundances of different grains can be arbitrarily chosen, but must be constant outside the dust sublimation region., i.e., the shape of the (arbitrary) radial dust density distribution outside the dust sublimation region is the same for all grain sizes and chemistries.

[ascl:1212.012] ddisk: Debris disk time-evolution

ddisk is an IDL script that calculates the time-evolution of a circumstellar debris disk. It calculates dust abundances over time for a debris-disk that is produced by a planetesimal disk that is grinding away due to collisional erosion.

[ascl:1207.006] dcr: Cosmic Ray Removal

This code provides a method for detecting cosmic rays in single images. The algorithm is based on a simple analysis of the histogram of the image data and does not use any modeling of the picture of the object. It does not require a good signal-to-noise ratio in the image data. Identification of multiple-pixel cosmic-ray hits is realized by running the procedure for detection and replacement iteratively. The method is very effective when applied to the images with spectroscopic data, and is also very fast in comparison with other single-image algorithms found in astronomical data-processing packages. Practical implementation and examples of application are presented in the code paper.

[ascl:1709.006] DCMDN: Deep Convolutional Mixture Density Network

Deep Convolutional Mixture Density Network (DCMDN) estimates probabilistic photometric redshift directly from multi-band imaging data by combining a version of a deep convolutional network with a mixture density network. The estimates are expressed as Gaussian mixture models representing the probability density functions (PDFs) in the redshift space. In addition to the traditional scores, the continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) and the probability integral transform (PIT) are applied as performance criteria. DCMDN is able to predict redshift PDFs independently from the type of source, e.g. galaxies, quasars or stars and renders pre-classification of objects and feature extraction unnecessary; the method is extremely general and allows the solving of any kind of probabilistic regression problems based on imaging data, such as estimating metallicity or star formation rate in galaxies.

[ascl:1903.012] DAVE: Discovery And Vetting of K2 Exoplanets

DAVE implements a pipeline to find and vet planets planets using data from NASA's K2 mission. The pipeline contains several modules tailored to particular aspects of the vetting procedures, using photocenter analysis to rule out background eclipsing binaries and flux time-series analysis to rule out odd–even differences, secondary eclipses, low-S/N events, variability other than a transit, and size of the transiting object.

[ascl:1405.011] DATACUBE: A datacube manipulation package

DATACUBE is a command-line package for manipulating and visualizing data cubes. It was designed for integral field spectroscopy but has been extended to be a generic data cube tool, used in particular for sub-millimeter data cubes from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. It is part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1402.027] Darth Fader: Galaxy catalog cleaning method for redshift estimation

Darth Fader is a wavelet-based method for extracting spectral features from very noisy spectra. Spectra for which a reliable redshift cannot be measured are identified and removed from the input data set automatically, resulting in a clean catalogue that gives an extremely low rate of catastrophic failures even when the spectra have a very low S/N. This technique may offer a significant boost in the number of faint galaxies with accurately determined redshifts.

[ascl:1110.002] DarkSUSY: Supersymmetric Dark Matter Calculations

DarkSUSY, written in Fortran, is a publicly-available advanced numerical package for neutralino dark matter calculations. In DarkSUSY one can compute the neutralino density in the Universe today using precision methods which include resonances, pair production thresholds and coannihilations. Masses and mixings of supersymmetric particles can be computed within DarkSUSY or with the help of external programs such as FeynHiggs, ISASUGRA and SUSPECT. Accelerator bounds can be checked to identify viable dark matter candidates. DarkSUSY also computes a large variety of astrophysical signals from neutralino dark matter, such as direct detection in low-background counting experiments and indirect detection through antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma-rays and positrons from the Galactic halo or high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Earth or of the Sun.

[ascl:1706.004] Dark Sage: Semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution

DARK SAGE is a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation that focuses on detailing the structure and evolution of galaxies' discs. The code-base, written in C, is an extension of SAGE (ascl:1601.006) and maintains the modularity of SAGE. DARK SAGE runs on any N-body simulation with trees organized in a supported format and containing a minimum set of basic halo properties.

[ascl:1011.002] DAOSPEC: An Automatic Code for Measuring Equivalent Widths in High-resolution Stellar Spectra

DAOSPEC is a Fortran code for measuring equivalent widths of absorption lines in stellar spectra with minimal human involvement. It works with standard FITS format files and it is designed for use with high resolution (R>15000) and high signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N>30) spectra that have been binned on a linear wavelength scale. First, we review the analysis procedures that are usually employed in the literature. Next, we discuss the principles underlying DAOSPEC and point out similarities and differences with respect to conventional measurement techniques. Then experiments with artificial and real spectra are discussed to illustrate the capabilities and limitations of DAOSPEC, with special attention given to the issues of continuum placement; radial velocities; and the effects of strong lines and line crowding. Finally, quantitative comparisons with other codes and with results from the literature are also presented.

[ascl:1104.011] DAOPHOT: Crowded-field Stellar Photometry Package

The DAOPHOT program exploits the capability of photometrically linear image detectors to perform stellar photometry in crowded fields. Raw CCD images are prepared prior to analysis, and following the obtaining of an initial star list with the FIND program, synthetic aperture photometry is performed on the detected objects with the PHOT routine. A local sky brightness and a magnitude are computed for each star in each of the specified stellar apertures, and for crowded fields, the empirical point-spread function must then be obtained for each data frame. The GROUP routine divides the star list for a given frame into optimum subgroups, and then the NSTAR routine is used to obtain photometry for all the stars in the frame by means of least-squares profile fits.

[ascl:1709.005] DanIDL: IDL solutions for science and astronomy

DanIDL provides IDL functions and routines for many standard astronomy needs, such as searching for matching points between two coordinate lists of two-dimensional points where each list corresponds to a different coordinate space, estimating the full-width half-maximum (FWHM) and ellipticity of the PSF of an image, calculating pixel variances for a set of calibrated image data, and fitting a 3-parameter plane model to image data. The library also supplies astrometry, general image processing, and general scientific applications.

[ascl:1807.023] DAMOCLES: Monte Carlo line radiative transfer code

The Monte Carlo code DAMOCLES models the effects of dust, composed of any combination of species and grain size distributions, on optical and NIR emission lines emitted from the expanding ejecta of a late-time (> 1 yr) supernova. The emissivity and dust distributions follow smooth radial power-law distributions; any arbitrary distribution can be specified by providing the appropriate grid. DAMOCLES treats a variety of clumping structures as specified by a clumped dust mass fraction, volume filling factor, clump size and clump power-law distribution, and the emissivity distribution may also initially be clumped. The code has a large number of variable parameters ranging from 5 dimensions in the simplest models to > 20 in the most complex cases.

[ascl:1412.004] DAMIT: Database of Asteroid Models from Inversion Techniques

DAMIT (Database of Asteroid Models from Inversion Techniques) is a database of three-dimensional models of asteroids computed using inversion techniques; it provides access to reliable and up-to-date physical models of asteroids, i.e., their shapes, rotation periods, and spin axis directions. Models from DAMIT can be used for further detailed studies of individual objects as well as for statistical studies of the whole set. The source codes for lightcurve inversion routines together with brief manuals, sample lightcurves, and the code for the direct problem are available for download.

[ascl:1011.006] DAME: A Web Oriented Infrastructure for Scientific Data Mining & Exploration

DAME (DAta Mining & Exploration) is an innovative, general purpose, Web-based, VObs compliant, distributed data mining infrastructure specialized in Massive Data Sets exploration with machine learning methods. Initially fine tuned to deal with astronomical data only, DAME has evolved in a general purpose platform which has found applications also in other domains of human endeavor.

[ascl:1706.003] DaMaSCUS: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings

DaMaSCUS calculates the density and velocity distribution of dark matter (DM) at any detector of given depth and latitude to provide dark matter particle trajectories inside the Earth. Provided a strong enough DM-matter interaction, the particles scatter on terrestrial atoms and get decelerated and deflected. The resulting local modifications of the DM velocity distribution and number density can have important consequences for direct detection experiments, especially for light DM, and lead to signatures such as diurnal modulations depending on the experiment's location on Earth. The code involves both the Monte Carlo simulation of particle trajectories and generation of data as well as the data analysis consisting of non-parametric density estimation of the local velocity distribution functions and computation of direct detection event rates.

[ascl:1803.001] DaMaSCUS-CRUST: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings - Crust Edition

DaMaSCUS-CRUST determines the critical cross-section for strongly interacting DM for various direct detection experiments systematically and precisely using Monte Carlo simulations of DM trajectories inside the Earth's crust, atmosphere, or any kind of shielding. Above a critical dark matter-nucleus scattering cross section, any terrestrial direct detection experiment loses sensitivity to dark matter, since the Earth crust, atmosphere, and potential shielding layers start to block off the dark matter particles. This critical cross section is commonly determined by describing the average energy loss of the dark matter particles analytically. However, this treatment overestimates the stopping power of the Earth crust; therefore, the obtained bounds should be considered as conservative. DaMaSCUS-CRUST is a modified version of DaMaSCUS (ascl:1706.003) that accounts for shielding effects and returns a precise exclusion band.

[ascl:1507.015] DALI: Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods

DALI (Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods) is a fast approximation of non-Gaussian likelihoods. It extends the Fisher Matrix in a straightforward way and allows for a wider range of posterior shapes. The code is written in C/C++.

[ascl:1804.005] DaCHS: Data Center Helper Suite

DaCHS, the Data Center Helper Suite, is an integrated package for publishing astronomical data sets to the Virtual Observatory. Network-facing, it speaks the major VO protocols (SCS, SIAP, SSAP, TAP, Datalink, etc). Operator-facing, many input formats, including FITS/WCS, ASCII files, and VOTable, can be processed to publication-ready data. DaCHS puts particular emphasis on integrated metadata handling, which facilitates a tight integration with the VO's Registry

[ascl:1612.007] dacapo_calibration: Photometric calibration code

dacapo_calibration implements the DaCapo algorithm used in the Planck/LFI 2015 data release for photometric calibration. The code takes as input a set of TODs and calibrates them using the CMB dipole signal. DaCapo is a variant of the well-known family of destriping algorithms for map-making.

[ascl:1504.018] D3PO: Denoising, Deconvolving, and Decomposing Photon Observations

D3PO (Denoising, Deconvolving, and Decomposing Photon Observations) addresses the inference problem of denoising, deconvolving, and decomposing photon observations. Its primary goal is the simultaneous but individual reconstruction of the diffuse and point-like photon flux given a single photon count image, where the fluxes are superimposed. A hierarchical Bayesian parameter model is used to discriminate between morphologically different signal components, yielding a diffuse and a point-like signal estimate for the photon flux components.

[ascl:1606.003] Cygrid: Cython-powered convolution-based gridding module for Python

The Python module Cygrid grids (resamples) data to any collection of spherical target coordinates, although its typical application involves FITS maps or data cubes. The module supports the FITS world coordinate system (WCS) standard; its underlying algorithm is based on the convolution of the original samples with a 2D Gaussian kernel. A lookup table scheme allows parallelization of the code and is combined with the HEALPix tessellation of the sphere for fast neighbor searches. Cygrid's runtime scales between O(n) and O(nlog n), with n being the number of input samples.

[submitted] cuvarbase: fast period finding utilities for GPU's (Python)

cuvarbase provides a Python (2.7+) library for performing period finding (Lomb-Scargle, Phase Dispersion Minimization, Conditional Entropy, Box-least squares) on astronomical time-series datasets. Speedups over CPU implementations depend on the algorithm, dataset, and GPU capabilities but are typically ~1-2 orders of magnitude and are especially high for BLS and Lomb-Scargle. Unit tested and available via pip or from source at GitHub.

[ascl:1708.018] CUTEX: CUrvature Thresholding EXtractor

CuTEx analyzes images in the infrared bands and extracts sources from complex backgrounds, particularly star-forming regions that offer the challenges of crowding, having a highly spatially variable background, and having no-psf profiles such as protostars in their accreting phase. The code is composed of two main algorithms, the first an algorithm for source detection, and the second for flux extraction. The code is originally written in IDL language and it was exported in the license free GDL language. CuTEx could be used in other bands or in scientific cases different from the native case.

This software is also available as an on-line tool from the Multi-Mission Interactive Archive web pages dedicated to the Herschel Observatory.

[ascl:1505.016] CUTE: Correlation Utilities and Two-point Estimation

CUTE (Correlation Utilities and Two-point Estimation) extracts any two-point statistic from enormous datasets with hundreds of millions of objects, such as large galaxy surveys. The computational time grows with the square of the number of objects to be correlated; technology provides multiple means to massively parallelize this problem and CUTE is specifically designed for these kind of calculations. Two implementations are provided: one for execution on shared-memory machines using OpenMP and one that runs on graphical processing units (GPUs) using CUDA.

[ascl:1405.015] CURSA: Catalog and Table Manipulation Applications

The CURSA package manipulates astronomical catalogs and similar tabular datasets. It provides facilities for browsing or examining catalogs; selecting subsets from a catalog; sorting and copying catalogs; pairing two catalogs; converting catalog coordinates between some celestial coordinate systems; and plotting finding charts and photometric calibration. It can also extract subsets from a catalog in a format suitable for plotting using other Starlink packages such as PONGO. CURSA can access catalogs held in the popular FITS table format, the Tab-Separated Table (TST) format or the Small Text List (STL) format. Catalogs in the STL and TST formats are simple ASCII text files. CURSA also includes some facilities for accessing remote on-line catalogs via the Internet. It is part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1311.008] CUPID: Customizable User Pipeline for IRS Data

Written in c, the Customizable User Pipeline for IRS Data (CUPID) allows users to run the Spitzer IRS Pipelines to re-create Basic Calibrated Data and extract calibrated spectra from the archived raw files. CUPID provides full access to all the parameters of the BCD, COADD, BKSUB, BKSUBX, and COADDX pipelines, as well as the opportunity for users to provide their own calibration files (e.g., flats or darks). CUPID is available for Mac, Linux, and Solaris operating systems.

[ascl:1311.007] CUPID: Clump Identification and Analysis Package

The CUPID package allows the identification and analysis of clumps of emission within 1, 2 or 3 dimensional data arrays. Whilst targeted primarily at sub-mm cubes, it can be used on any regularly gridded 1, 2 or 3D data. A variety of clump finding algorithms are implemented within CUPID, including the established ClumpFind (ascl:1107.014) and GaussClumps algorithms. In addition, two new algorithms called FellWalker and Reinhold are also provided. CUPID allows easy inter-comparison between the results of different algorithms; the catalogues produced by each algorithm contains a standard set of columns containing clump peak position, clump centroid position, the integrated data value within the clump, clump volume, and the dimensions of the clump. In addition, pixel masks are produced identifying which input pixels contribute to each clump. CUPID is distributed as part of the Starlink (ascl:1110.012) software collection.

[ascl:1109.013] CULSP: Fast Calculation of the Lomb-Scargle Periodogram Using Graphics Processing Units

I introduce a new code for fast calculation of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, that leverages the computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). After establishing a background to the newly emergent field of GPU computing, I discuss the code design and narrate key parts of its source. Benchmarking calculations indicate no significant differences in accuracy compared to an equivalent CPU-based code. However, the differences in performance are pronounced; running on a low-end GPU, the code can match 8 CPU cores, and on a high-end GPU it is faster by a factor approaching thirty. Applications of the code include analysis of long photometric time series obtained by ongoing satellite missions and upcoming ground-based monitoring facilities; and Monte-Carlo simulation of periodogram statistical properties.

[ascl:1810.015] cuFFS: CUDA-accelerated Fast Faraday Synthesis

cuFFS (CUDA-accelerated Fast Faraday Synthesis) performs Faraday rotation measure synthesis; it is particularly well-suited for performing RM synthesis on large datasets. Compared to a fast single-threaded and vectorized CPU implementation, depending on the structure and format of the data cubes, cuFFs achieves an increase in speed of up to two orders of magnitude. The code assumes that the pixels values are IEEE single precision floating points (BITPIX=-32), and the input cubes must have 3 axes (2 spatial dimensions and 1 frequency axis) with frequency axis as NAXIS1. A package is included to reformat data with individual stokes Q and U channel maps to the required format. The code supports both the HDFITS format and the standard FITS format, and is written in C with GPU-acceleration achieved using Nvidia's CUDA parallel computing platform.

[ascl:1111.007] CUBISM: CUbe Builder for IRS Spectra Maps

CUBISM, written in IDL, constructs spectral cubes, maps, and arbitrary aperture 1D spectral extractions from sets of mapping mode spectra taken with Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. CUBISM is optimized for non-sparse maps of extended objects, e.g. the nearby galaxy sample of SINGS, but can be used with data from any spectral mapping AOR (primarily validated for maps which are designed as suggested by the mapping HOWTO).

[ascl:1805.031] CubiCal: Suite for fast radio interferometric calibration

CubiCal implements several accelerated gain solvers which exploit complex optimization for fast radio interferometric gain calibration. The code can be used for both direction-independent and direction-dependent self-calibration. CubiCal is implemented in Python and Cython, and multiprocessing is fully supported.

[ascl:1208.018] CUBEP3M: High performance P3M N-body code

CUBEP3M is a high performance cosmological N-body code which has many utilities and extensions, including a runtime halo finder, a non-Gaussian initial conditions generator, a tuneable accuracy, and a system of unique particle identification. CUBEP3M is fast, has a memory imprint up to three times lower than other widely used N-body codes, and has been run on up to 20,000 cores, achieving close to ideal weak scaling even at this problem size. It is well suited and has already been used for a broad number of science applications that require either large samples of non-linear realizations or very large dark matter N-body simulations, including cosmological reionization, baryonic acoustic oscillations, weak lensing or non-Gaussian statistics.

[ascl:1512.010] CubeIndexer: Indexer for regions of interest in data cubes

CubeIndexer indexes regions of interest (ROIs) in data cubes reducing the necessary storage space. The software can process data cubes containing megabytes of data in fractions of a second without human supervision, thus allowing it to be incorporated into a production line for displaying objects in a virtual observatory. The software forms part of the Chilean Virtual Observatory (ChiVO) and provides the capability of content-based searches on data cubes to the astronomical community.

[ascl:1805.018] CUBE: Information-optimized parallel cosmological N-body simulation code

CUBE, written in Coarray Fortran, is a particle-mesh based parallel cosmological N-body simulation code. The memory usage of CUBE can approach as low as 6 bytes per particle. Particle pairwise (PP) force, cosmological neutrinos, spherical overdensity (SO) halofinder are included.

[ascl:1609.010] CuBANz: Photometric redshift estimator

CuBANz is a photometric redshift estimator code for high redshift galaxies that uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, making it very efficient. The training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u-g, g-r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands, as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. The clustering method enables accurate determination of the redshifts. CuBANz considers uncertainty in the photometric measurements as well as uncertainty in the neural network training. The code is written in C.

[ascl:1608.008] Cuba: Multidimensional numerical integration library

The Cuba library offers four independent routines for multidimensional numerical integration: Vegas, Suave, Divonne, and Cuhre. The four algorithms work by very different methods, and can integrate vector integrands and have very similar Fortran, C/C++, and Mathematica interfaces. Their invocation is very similar, making it easy to cross-check by substituting one method by another. For further safeguarding, the output is supplemented by a chi-square probability which quantifies the reliability of the error estimate.

[ascl:1601.005] ctools: Cherenkov Telescope Science Analysis Software

ctools provides tools for the scientific analysis of Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) data. Analysis of data from existing Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC or VERITAS) is also supported, provided that the data and response functions are available in the format defined for CTA. ctools comprises a set of ftools-like binary executables with a command-line interface allowing for interactive step-wise data analysis. A Python module allows control of all executables, and the creation of shell or Python scripts and pipelines is supported. ctools provides cscripts, which are Python scripts complementing the binary executables. Extensions of the ctools package by user defined binary executables or Python scripts is supported. ctools are based on GammaLib (ascl:1110.007).

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