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[ascl:1904.014] rate: Reliable Analytic Thermochemical Equilibrium

rate computes thermochemical-equilibrium abundances for a H-C-N-O system with known pressure, temperature, and elemental abundances. The output abundances are H2O, CH4, CO, CO2, NH3, C2H2, C2H4, HCN, and N2, H2, H, and He.

[ascl:1803.015] RAPTOR: Imaging code for relativistic plasmas in strong gravity

RAPTOR produces accurate images, animations, and spectra of relativistic plasmas in strong gravity by numerically integrating the equations of motion of light rays and performing time-dependent radiative transfer calculations along the rays. The code is compatible with any analytical or numerical spacetime, is hardware-agnostic and may be compiled and run on both GPUs and CPUs. RAPTOR is useful for studying accretion models of supermassive black holes, performing time-dependent radiative transfer through general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (GRMHD) simulations and investigating the expected observational differences between the so-called fastlight and slow-light paradigms.

[ascl:1011.007] RAMSES: A new N-body and hydrodynamical code

A new N-body and hydrodynamical code, called RAMSES, is presented. It has been designed to study structure formation in the universe with high spatial resolution. The code is based on Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) technique, with a tree based data structure allowing recursive grid refinements on a cell-by-cell basis. The N-body solver is very similar to the one developed for the ART code (Kravtsov et al. 97), with minor differences in the exact implementation. The hydrodynamical solver is based on a second-order Godunov method, a modern shock-capturing scheme known to compute accurately the thermal history of the fluid component. The accuracy of the code is carefully estimated using various test cases, from pure gas dynamical tests to cosmological ones. The specific refinement strategy used in cosmological simulations is described, and potential spurious effects associated to shock waves propagation in the resulting AMR grid are discussed and found to be negligible. Results obtained in a large N-body and hydrodynamical simulation of structure formation in a low density LCDM universe are finally reported, with 256^3 particles and 4.1 10^7 cells in the AMR grid, reaching a formal resolution of 8192^3. A convergence analysis of different quantities, such as dark matter density power spectrum, gas pressure power spectrum and individual haloes temperature profiles, shows that numerical results are converging down to the actual resolution limit of the code, and are well reproduced by recent analytical predictions in the framework of the halo model.

[ascl:1710.013] Ramses-GPU: Second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver

RamsesGPU is a reimplementation of RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) which drops the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) features to optimize 3D uniform grid algorithms for modern graphics processor units (GPU) to provide an efficient software package for astrophysics applications that do not need AMR features but do require a very large number of integration time steps. RamsesGPU provides an very efficient C++/CUDA/MPI software implementation of a second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver for compressible hydrodynamics as a magnetohydrodynamics solver based on the constraint transport technique. Other useful modules includes static gravity, dissipative terms (viscosity, resistivity), and forcing source term for turbulence studies, and special care was taken to enhance parallel input/output performance by using state-of-the-art libraries such as HDF5 and parallel-netcdf.

[ascl:1411.010] Raga: Monte Carlo simulations of gravitational dynamics of non-spherical stellar systems

Raga (Relaxation in Any Geometry) is a Monte Carlo simulation method for gravitational dynamics of non-spherical stellar systems. It is based on the SMILE software (ascl:1308.001) for orbit analysis. It can simulate stellar systems with a much smaller number of particles N than the number of stars in the actual system, represent an arbitrary non-spherical potential with a basis-set or spline spherical-harmonic expansion with the coefficients of expansion computed from particle trajectories, and compute particle trajectories independently and in parallel using a high-accuracy adaptive-timestep integrator. Raga can also model two-body relaxation by local (position-dependent) velocity diffusion coefficients (as in Spitzer's Monte Carlo formulation) and adjust the magnitude of relaxation to the actual number of stars in the target system, and model the effect of a central massive black hole.

[ascl:1902.008] Radynversion: Solar atmospheric properties during a solar flare

Radynversion infers solar atmospheric properties during a solar flare. The code is based on an Invertible Neural Network (INN) that is trained to learn an approximate bijective mapping between the atmospheric properties of electron density, temperature, and bulk velocity (all as a function of altitude), and the observed Hα and Ca II λ8542 line profiles. As information is lost in the forward process of radiation transfer, this information is injected back into the model during the inverse process by means of a latent space; the training allows this latent space to be filled using an n-dimensional unit Gaussian distribution, where n is the dimensionality of the latent space. The code is based on a model trained by simulations made by RADYN, a 1D non-equilibrium radiation hydrodynamic model with good optically thick radiation treatment that does not consider magnetic effects.

[ascl:1801.012] RadVel: General toolkit for modeling Radial Velocities

RadVel models Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) time series. The code is written in Python with a fast Kepler's equation solver written in C. It provides a framework for fitting RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and computing robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel can perform Bayesian model comparison and produces publication quality plots and LaTeX tables.

[ascl:9910.009] RADPACK: A RADical compression analysis PACKage for fitting to the CMB

The RADPACK package, written in IDL, contains both data and software. The data are the constraints on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular power spectrum from all published data as of 9/99. A unique aspect of this compilation is that the non-Gaussianity of the uncertainties has been characterized. The most important program in the package, written in the IDL language, is called chisq.pro and calculates $chi^2$, for an input power spectrum, according to the offset log-normal form of Bond, Jaffe and Knox (astro-ph/9808264). chisq.pro also outputs files that are useful for examining the residuals (the difference between the predictions of the model and the data). There is an sm macro for plotting up the residuals, and a histogram of the residuals. The histogram is actually for the 'whitenend' residuals ---a linear combination of the residuals which leaves them uncorrelated and with unit variance. The expectation is that the whitened residuals will be distributed as a Gaussian with unit variance.

[ascl:1811.015] radon: Streak detection using the Fast Radon Transform

radon performs a Fast Radon Transform (FRT) on image data for streak detection. The software finds short streaks and multiple streaks, convolves the images with a given PSF, and tracks the best S/N results and find a automatic threshold. It also calculates the streak parameters in the input image and the streak parameters in the input image. radon has a simulator that can make multiple streaks of different intensities and coordinates, and can simulate random streaks with parameters chosen uniformly in a user-defined range.

[ascl:1108.016] RADMC: A 2-D Continuum Radiative Transfer Tool

RADMC is a 2-D Monte-Carlo code for dust continuum radiative transfer circumstellar disks and envelopes. It is based on the method of Bjorkman & Wood (ApJ 2001, 554, 615), but with several modifications to produce smoother results with fewer photon packages.

[ascl:1202.015] RADMC-3D: A multi-purpose radiative transfer tool

RADMC-3D is a software package for astrophysical radiative transfer calculations in arbitrary 1-D, 2-D or 3-D geometries. It is mainly written for continuum radiative transfer in dusty media, but also includes modules for gas line transfer and gas continuum transfer. RADMC-3D is a new incarnation of the older software package RADMC (ascl:1108.016).

[ascl:1308.012] RADLite: Raytracer for infrared line spectra

RADLite is a raytracer that is optimized for producing infrared line spectra and images from axisymmetric density structures, originally developed to function on top of the dust radiative transfer code RADMC. RADLite can consistently deal with a wide range of velocity gradients, such as those typical for the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. The code is intended as a back-end for chemical and excitation codes, and can rapidly produce spectra of thousands of lines for grids of models for comparison with observations. It includes functionality for simulating telescopic images for optical/IR/midIR/farIR telescopes. It takes advantage of multi-threaded CPUs and includes an escape-probability non-LTE module.

[ascl:1108.014] RADICAL: Multi-purpose 2-D Radiative Transfer Code

RADICAL is a multi-purpose 2-D radiative transfer code for axi-symmetric circumstellar (or circum-black-hole) envelopes /disks / tori etc. It has been extensively tested and found reliable and accurate. The code has recently been supplemented with a Variable Eddington Tensor module which enables it to solve dust continuum radiative transfer problems from very low up to extremely high optical depths with only a few (about 7) iterations at most.

[ascl:1806.017] RadFil: Radial density profile builder for interstellar filaments

RadFil is a radial density profile building and fitting tool for interstellar filaments. The software uses an image array and (in most cases) a boolean mask array that delineates the boundary of the filament to build and fit a radial density profile for the filaments.

[ascl:1010.075] Radex: Fast Non-LTE Analysis of Interstellar Line Spectra

The large quantity and high quality of modern radio and infrared line observations require efficient modeling techniques to infer physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, density, and molecular abundances. Radex calculates the intensities of atomic and molecular lines produced in a uniform medium, based on statistical equilibrium calculations involving collisional and radiative processes and including radiation from background sources. Optical depth effects are treated with an escape probability method. The program makes use of molecular data files maintained in the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA), which will continue to be improved and expanded. The performance of the program is compared with more approximate and with more sophisticated methods. An Appendix provides diagnostic plots to estimate physical parameters from line intensity ratios of commonly observed molecules. This program should form an important tool in analyzing observations from current and future radio and infrared telescopes.

[ascl:1711.015] rac-2d: Thermo-chemical for modeling water vapor formation in protoplanetary disks

rec-2d models the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks. Given a distribution of gas and dust, rac-2d first solves the dust temperature distribution with a Monte Carlo method and then solves the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. Although the geometry is symmetric with respect to rotation around the central axis and reflection about the midplane, the photon propagation is done in full three dimensions. After establishing the dust temperature distribution, the disk chemistry is evolved for 1 Myr; the heating and cooling processes are coupled with chemistry, allowing the gas temperature to be evolved in tandem with chemistry based on the heating and cooling rates.

[ascl:1502.013] Rabacus: Analytic Cosmological Radiative Transfer Calculations

Rabacus performs analytic radiative transfer calculations in simple geometries relevant to cosmology and astrophysics; it also contains tools to calculate cosmological quantities such as the power spectrum and mass function. With core routines written in Fortran 90 and then wrapped in Python, the execution speed is thousands of times faster than equivalent routines written in pure Python.

[ascl:1106.005] R3D: Reduction Package for Integral Field Spectroscopy

R3D was developed to reduce fiber-based integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. The package comprises a set of command-line routines adapted for each of these steps, suitable for creating pipelines. The routines have been tested against simulations, and against real data from various integral field spectrographs (PMAS, PPAK, GMOS, VIMOS and INTEGRAL). Particular attention is paid to the treatment of cross-talk.

R3D unifies the reduction techniques for the different IFS instruments to a single one, in order to allow the general public to reduce different instruments data in an homogeneus, consistent and simple way. Although still in its prototyping phase, it has been proved to be useful to reduce PMAS (both in the Larr and the PPAK modes), VIMOS and INTEGRAL data. The current version has been coded in Perl, using PDL, in order to speed-up the algorithm testing phase. Most of the time critical algorithms have been translated to C[float=][/float], and it is our intention to translate all of them. However, even in this phase R3D is fast enough to produce valuable science frames in reasonable time.

[ascl:1104.009] r-Java: An r-process Code and Graphical User Interface for Heavy-Element Nucleosynthesis

r-Java performs r-process nucleosynthesis calculations. It has a simple graphical user interface and is carries out nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) as well as static and dynamic r-process calculations for a wide range of input parameters. r-Java generates an abundance pattern based on a general entropy expression that can be applied to degenerate as well as non-degenerate matter, which allows tracking of the rapid density and temperature evolution of the ejecta during the initial stages of ejecta expansion.

[ascl:1210.028] QYMSYM: A GPU-accelerated hybrid symplectic integrator

QYMSYM is a GPU accelerated 2nd order hybrid symplectic integrator that identifies close approaches between particles and switches from symplectic to Hermite algorithms for particles that require higher resolution integrations. This is a parallel code running with CUDA on a video card that puts the many processors on board to work while taking advantage of fast shared memory.

[ascl:1811.006] QuickSip: Project survey image properties onto the sky into Healpix maps

QuickSip quickly projects Survey Image Properties (e.g. seeing, sky noise, airmass) into Healpix sky maps with flexible weighting schemes. It was initially designed to produce observing condition "systematics" maps for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), but will work with any multi-epoch survey and images with valid WCS. QuickSip can reproduce the Mangle (ascl:1202.005) magnitude limit maps at sub-percent accuracy but doesn't support additional masks (stars, trails, etc), in which case Mangle should be used. Thus, QuickSip can be seen as a simplified Mangle to project image properties into Healpix maps in a fast and more flexible manner.

[ascl:1402.024] QuickReduce: Data reduction pipeline for the WIYN One Degree Imager

QuickReduce quickly reduces data for ODI and is optimized for a first data inspection during acquisition at the the telescope. When installed on the ODI observer's interface, QuickReduce, coded in Python, performs all basic reduction steps as well as more advanced corrections for pupil-ghost removal, fringe correction and masking of persistent pixels and is capable enough for science-quality data reductions. It can also add an accurate astrometric WCS solution based on the 2MASS reference system as well as photometric zeropoint calibration for frames covered by the SDSS foot-print. The pipeline makes use of multiple CPU-cores wherever possible, resulting in an execution time of only a few seconds per frame, thus offering the ODI observer a convenient way to closely monitor data quality.

[ascl:1402.012] QUICKCV: Cosmic variance calculator

QUICKCV is an IDL sample variance/cosmic variance calculator for some geometry for galaxies in given stellar mass bins as a function of mean redshift and redshift bin size.

[ascl:1704.006] Quickclump: Identify clumps within a 3D FITS datacube

Quickclump finds clumps in a 3D FITS datacube. It is a fast, accurate, and automated tool written in Python. Though Quickclump is primarily intended for decomposing observations of interstellar clouds into individual clumps, it can also be used for finding clumps in any 3D rectangular data.

[ascl:1703.011] QtClassify: IFS data emission line candidates classifier

QtClassify is a GUI that helps classify emission lines found in integral field spectroscopic data. Input needed is a datacube as well as a catalog with emission lines and a signal-to-noise cube, such at that created by LSDCat (ascl:1612.002). The main idea is to take each detected line and guess what line it could be (and thus the redshift of the object). You would expect to see other lines that might not have been detected but are visible in the cube if you know where to look, which is why parts of the spectrum are shown where other lines are expected. In addition, monochromatic layers of the datacube are displayed, making it easy to spot additional emission lines.

[ascl:1612.011] QSFit: Quasar Spectral FITting

QSFit performs automatic analysis of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) optical spectra. It provides estimates of: AGN continuum luminosities and slopes at several restframe wavelengths; luminosities, widths and velocity offsets of 20 emission lines; luminosities of iron blended lines at optical and UV wavelengths; host galaxy luminosities. The whole fitting process is customizable for specific needs, and can be extended to analyze spectra from other data sources. The ultimate purpose of QSFit is to allow astronomers to run standardized recipes to analyze the AGN data, in a simple, replicable and shareable way.

[ascl:1809.011] qp: Quantile parametrization for probability distribution functions

qp manipulates parametrizations of 1-dimensional probability distribution functions, as suitable for photo-z PDF compression. The code helps determine a parameterization for storing a catalog of photo-z PDFs that balances the available storage resources against the accuracy of the photo-z PDFs and science products reconstructed from the stored parameters.

[ascl:1304.016] Qhull: Quickhull algorithm for computing the convex hull

Qhull computes the convex hull, Delaunay triangulation, Voronoi diagram, halfspace intersection about a point, furthest-site Delaunay triangulation, and furthest-site Voronoi diagram. The source code runs in 2-d, 3-d, 4-d, and higher dimensions. Qhull implements the Quickhull algorithm for computing the convex hull. It handles roundoff errors from floating point arithmetic. It computes volumes, surface areas, and approximations to the convex hull.

[ascl:1210.019] QFitsView: FITS file viewer

QFitsView is a FITS file viewer that can display one, two, and three-dimensional FITS files. It has three modes of operation, depending of what kind of data is being displayed. One-dimensional data are shown in an x-y plot. Two-dimensional images are shown in the main window. Three-dimensional data cubes can be displayed in a variety of ways, with the third dimension shown as a x-y plot at the bottom of the image display. QFitsView was written in C++ and uses the Qt widget library, which makes it available for all major platforms: Windows, MAC OS X, and many Unix variants.

[ascl:1806.006] QE: Quantum opEn-Source Package for Research in Electronic Structure, Simulation, and Optimization

Quantum ESPRESSO (opEn-Source Package for Research in Electronic Structure, Simulation, and Optimization) is an integrated suite of codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It is based on density-functional theory, plane waves, and pseudopotentials. QE performs ground-state calculations such as self-consistent total energies, forces, stresses and Kohn-Sham orbitals, Car-Parrinello and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, and quantum transport such as ballistic transport, coherent transport from maximally localized Wannier functions, and Kubo-Greenwood electrical conductivity. It can also determine spectroscopic properties and examine time-dependent density functional perturbations and electronic excitations, and has a wide range of other functions.

[ascl:1601.015] QDPHOT: Quick & Dirty PHOTometry

QDPHOT is a fast CCD stellar photometry task which quickly produces CCD stellar photometry from two CCD images of a star field. It was designed to be a data mining tool for finding high-quality stellar observations in the data archives of the National Virtual Observatory. QDPHOT typically takes just a few seconds to analyze two Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 observations of Local Group star clusters. It is also suitable for real-time data-quality analysis of CCD observations; on-the-fly instrumental color-magnitude diagrams can be produced at the telescope console during the few seconds between CCD readouts.

[ascl:1712.014] QATS: Quasiperiodic Automated Transit Search

QATS detects transiting extrasolar planets in time-series photometry. It relaxes the usual assumption of strictly periodic transits by permitting a variable, but bounded, interval between successive transits.

[ascl:1806.003] pyZELDA: Python code for Zernike wavefront sensors

pyZELDA analyzes data from Zernike wavefront sensors dedicated to high-contrast imaging applications. This modular software was originally designed to analyze data from the ZELDA wavefront sensor prototype installed in VLT/SPHERE; simple configuration files allow it to be extended to support several other instruments and testbeds. pyZELDA also includes simple simulation tools to measure the theoretical sensitivity of a sensor and to compare it to other sensors.

[ascl:1608.002] pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

[ascl:1402.034] PyWiFeS: Wide Field Spectrograph data reduction pipeline

PyWiFeS is a Python-based data reduction pipeline for the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS). Its core data processing routines are built on standard scientific Python packages commonly used in astronomical applications. It includes an implementation of a global optical model of the spectrograph which provides wavelengths solutions accurate to ˜0.05 Å (RMS) across the entire detector. Through scripting, PyWiFeS can enable batch processing of large quantities of data.

[ascl:1402.004] PyVO: Python access to the Virtual Observatory

PyVO provides access to remote data and services of the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python. It allows archive searches for data of a particular type or related to a particular topic and query submissions to obtain data to a particular archive to download selected data products. PyVO supports querying the VAO registry; simple data access services (DAL) to access images (SIA), source catalog records (Cone Search), spectra (SSA), and spectral line emission/absorption data (SLAP); and object name resolution (for converting names of objects in the sky into positions). PyVO requires both AstroPy and NumPy.

[ascl:1810.009] PyUltraLight: Pseudo-spectral Python code to compute ultralight dark matter dynamics

PyUltraLight computes non-relativistic ultralight dark matter dynamics in a static spacetime background. It uses pseudo-spectral methods to compute the evolution of a complex scalar field governed by the Schrödinger-Poisson system of coupled differential equations. Computations are performed on a fixed-grid with periodic boundary conditions, allowing for a decomposition of the field in momentum space by way of the discrete Fourier transform. The field is then evolved through a symmetrized split-step Fourier algorithm, in which nonlinear operators are applied in real space, while spatial derivatives are computed in Fourier space. Fourier transforms within PyUltraLight are handled using the pyFFTW pythonic wrapper around FFTW (ascl:1201.015).

[ascl:1710.010] PyTransport: Calculate inflationary correlation functions

PyTransport calculates the 2-point and 3-point function of inflationary perturbations produced during multi-field inflation. The core of PyTransport is C++ code which is automatically edited and compiled into a Python module once an inflationary potential is specified. This module can then be called to solve the background inflationary cosmology as well as the evolution of correlations of inflationary perturbations. PyTransport includes two additional modules written in Python, one to perform the editing and compilation, and one containing a suite of functions for common tasks such as looping over the core module to construct spectra and bispectra.

[ascl:1505.024] PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

[ascl:1501.010] PythonPhot: Simple DAOPHOT-type photometry in Python

PythonPhot is a simple Python translation of DAOPHOT-type (ascl:1104.011) photometry procedures from the IDL AstroLib (Landsman 1993), including aperture and PSF-fitting algorithms, with a few modest additions to increase functionality and ease of use. These codes allow fast, easy, and reliable photometric measurements and are currently used in the Pan-STARRS supernova pipeline and the HST CLASH/CANDELS supernova analysis.

[ascl:1501.003] python-qucs: Python package for automating QUCS simulations

Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Python-qucs automates the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results of QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator) simulations.

[ascl:1612.001] Python-CPL: Python interface for the ESO Common Pipeline Library

Python-CPL is a framework to configure and execute pipeline recipes written with the Common Pipeline Library (CPL) (ascl:1402.010) with Python2 or Python3. The input, calibration and output data can be specified as FITS files or as astropy.io.fits objects in memory. The package is used to implement the MUSE pipeline in the AstroWISE data management system.

[ascl:1303.023] pysynphot: Synthetic photometry software package

pysynphot is a synthetic photometry software package suitable for either library or interactive use. Intended as a modern-language successor to the IRAF/STSDAS synphot package, it provides improved algorithms that address known shortcomings in synphot, and its object-oriented design is more easily extensible than synphot's task-oriented approach. It runs under PyRAF (ascl:1207.011), and a backwards compatibility mode is provided that recognizes all spectral and throughput tables, obsmodes, and spectral expressions used by synphot, to facilitate the transition for legacy code.

[ascl:1109.001] PySpecKit: Python Spectroscopic Toolkit

PySpecKit is a Python spectroscopic analysis and reduction toolkit meant to be generally applicable to optical, infrared, and radio spectra. It is capable of reading FITS-standard and many non-standard file types including CLASS spectra. It contains procedures for line fitting including gaussian and voigt profile fitters, and baseline-subtraction routines. It is capable of more advanced line fitting using arbitrary model grids. Fitting can be done both in batch mode and interactively. PySpecKit also produces publication-quality plots with TeX axis labels and annotations. It is designed to be extensible, allowing user-written reader, writer, and fitting routines to be "plugged in." It is actively under development and currently in the 'alpha' phase, with plans for a beta release.

[ascl:1411.002] pysovo: A library for implementing alerts triggered by VOEvents

pysovo contains basic tools to work with VOEvents. Though written for specific needs, others interested in VOEvents may find it useful to examine.

[ascl:1503.008] pYSOVAR: Lightcurves analysis

The pYSOVAR code calculates properties for a stack of lightcurves, including simple descriptive statistics (mean, max, min, ...), timing (e.g. Lomb-Scargle periodograms), variability indixes (e.g. Stetson), and color properties (e.g. slope in the color-magnitude diagram). The code is written in python and is closely integrated with astropy tables. Initially, pYSOVAR was written specifically for the analysis of two clusters in the YSOVAR project, using the (not publicly released) YSOVAR database as an input. Additional functionality has been added and the code has become more general; it is now useful for other clusters in the YSOVAR dataset or for other projects that have similar data (lightcurves in one or more bands with a few hundred points for a few thousand objects), though may not work out-of-the-box for different datasets.

[ascl:1704.007] PySM: Python Sky Model

PySM generates full-sky simulations of Galactic foregrounds in intensity and polarization relevant for CMB experiments. The components simulated are thermal dust, synchrotron, AME, free-free, and CMB at a given Nside, with an option to integrate over a top hat bandpass, to add white instrument noise, and to smooth with a given beam. PySM is based on the large-scale Galactic part of Planck Sky Model code and uses some of its inputs.

[ascl:1805.026] PySE: Python Source Extractor for radio astronomical images

PySE finds and measures sources in radio telescope images. It is run with several options, such as the detection threshold (a multiple of the local noise), grid size, and the forced clean beam fit, followed by a list of input image files in standard FITS or CASA format. From these, PySe provides a list of found sources; information such as the calculated background image, source list in different formats (e.g. text, region files importable in DS9), and other data may be saved. PySe can be integrated into a pipeline; it was originally written as part of the LOFAR Transient Detection Pipeline (TraP, ascl:1412.011).

[ascl:1207.010] PySALT: SALT science pipeline

The PySALT user package contains the primary reduction and analysis software tools for the SALT telescope. Currently, these tools include basic data reductions for RSS and SALTICAM in both imaging, spectroscopic, and slot modes. Basic analysis software for slot mode data is also provided. These tools are primarily written in python/PyRAF with some additional IRAF code.

[ascl:1904.026] pyRSD: Accurate predictions for the clustering of galaxies in redshift-space in Python

pyRSD computes the theoretical predictions of the redshift-space power spectrum of galaxies. It also includes functionality for fitting data measurements and finding the optimal model parameters, using both MCMC and nonlinear optimization techniques.

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