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Results 501-550 of 1772 (1747 ASCL, 25 submitted)

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[ascl:1606.002] PAL: Positional Astronomy Library

The PAL library is a partial re-implementation of Pat Wallace's popular SLALIB library written in C using a Gnu GPL license and layered on top of the IAU's SOFA library (or the BSD-licensed ERFA) where appropriate. PAL attempts to stick to the SLA C API where possible.

[ascl:1606.001] SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

[ascl:1605.017] Surprise Calculator: Estimating relative entropy and Surprise between samples

The Surprise is a measure for consistency between posterior distributions and operates in parameter space. It can be used to analyze either the compatibility of separately analyzed posteriors from two datasets, or the posteriors from a Bayesian update. The Surprise Calculator estimates relative entropy and Surprise between two samples, assuming they are Gaussian. The software requires the R package CompQuadForm to estimate the significance of the Surprise, and rpy2 to interface R with Python.

[ascl:1605.016] zeldovich-PLT: Zel'dovich approximation initial conditions generator

zeldovich-PLT generates Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) initial conditions (i.e. first-order Lagrangian perturbation theory) for cosmological N-body simulations, optionally applying particle linear theory (PLT) corrections.

[ascl:1605.015] SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

[ascl:1605.014] DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

[ascl:1605.013] grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

[ascl:1605.012] K2SC: K2 Systematics Correction

K2SC (K2 Systematics Correction) models instrumental systematics and astrophysical variability in light curves from the K2 mission. It enables the user to remove both position-dependent systematics and time-dependent variability (e.g., for transit searches) or to remove systematics while preserving variability (for variability studies). K2SC automatically computes estimates of the period, amplitude and evolution timescale of the variability for periodic variables and can be run on ASCII and FITS light curve files. Written in Python, this pipeline requires NumPy, SciPy, MPI4Py, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and George (ascl:1511.015).

[ascl:1605.011] DISCO: 3-D moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics package

DISCO evolves orbital fluid motion in two and three dimensions, especially at high Mach number, for studying astrophysical disks. The software uses a moving-mesh approach with a dynamic cylindrical mesh that can shear azimuthally to follow the orbital motion of the gas, thus removing diffusive advection errors and permitting longer timesteps than a static grid. DISCO uses an HLLD Riemann solver and a constrained transport scheme compatible with the mesh motion to implement magnetohydrodynamics.

[ascl:1605.010] TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

[ascl:1605.009] ASTRiDE: Automated Streak Detection for Astronomical Images

ASTRiDE detects streaks in astronomical images using a "border" of each object (i.e. "boundary-tracing" or "contour-tracing") and their morphological parameters. Fast moving objects such as meteors, satellites, near-Earth objects (NEOs), or even cosmic rays can leave streak-like traces in the images; ASTRiDE can detect not only long streaks but also relatively short or curved streaks.

[ascl:1605.008] PDT: Photometric DeTrending Algorithm Using Machine Learning

PDT removes systematic trends in light curves. It finds clusters of light curves that are highly correlated using machine learning, constructs one master trend per cluster and detrends an individual light curve using the constructed master trends by minimizing residuals while constraining coefficients to be positive.

[ascl:1605.007] MUSCLE: MUltiscale Spherical-ColLapse Evolution

MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution) produces low-redshift approximate N-body realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales. It applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory - 2LPT), and by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme.

[ascl:1605.006] CAMELOT: Cloud Archive for MEtadata, Library and Online Toolkit

CAMELOT facilitates the comparison of observational data and simulations of molecular clouds and/or star-forming regions. The central component of CAMELOT is a database summarizing the properties of observational data and simulations in the literature through pertinent metadata. The core functionality allows users to upload metadata, search and visualize the contents of the database to find and match observations/simulations over any range of parameter space.

To bridge the fundamental disconnect between inherently 2D observational data and 3D simulations, the code uses key physical properties that, in principle, are straightforward for both observers and simulators to measure — the surface density (Sigma), velocity dispersion (sigma) and radius (R). By determining these in a self-consistent way for all entries in the database, it should be possible to make robust comparisons.

[ascl:1605.005] TMBIDL: Single dish radio astronomy data reduction package

The IDL package reduces and analyzes radio astronomy data. It translates SDFITS files into TMBIDL format, and can average and display spectra, remove baselines, and fit Gaussian models.

[ascl:1605.004] BACCHUS: Brussels Automatic Code for Characterizing High accUracy Spectra

BACCHUS (Brussels Automatic Code for Characterizing High accUracy Spectra) derives stellar parameters (Teff, log g, metallicity, microturbulence velocity and rotational velocity), equivalent widths, and abundances. The code includes on the fly spectrum synthesis, local continuum normalization, estimation of local S/N, automatic line masking, four methods for abundance determinations, and a flagging system aiding line selection. BACCHUS relies on the grid of MARCS model atmospheres, Masseron's model atmosphere thermodynamic structure interpolator, and the radiative transfer code Turbospectrum (ascl:1205.004).

[ascl:1605.003] Shadowfax: Moving mesh hydrodynamical integration code

Shadowfax simulates galaxy evolution. Written in object-oriented modular C++, it evolves a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. For the hydrodynamical integration, it makes use of a (co-) moving Lagrangian mesh. The code has a 2D and 3D version, contains utility programs to generate initial conditions and visualize simulation snapshots, and its input/output is compatible with a number of other simulation codes, e.g. Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) and GIZMO (ascl:1410.003).

[ascl:1605.002] cluster-lensing: Tools for calculating properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters

The cluster-lensing package calculates properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters. Implemented in Python, it includes cluster mass-richness and mass-concentration scaling relations, and NFW halo profiles for weak lensing shear, the differential surface mass density ΔΣ(r), and for magnification, Σ(r). Optionally the calculation will include the effects of cluster miscentering offsets.

[ascl:1605.001] MARZ: Redshifting Program

MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

[ascl:1604.012] TTVFaster: First order eccentricity transit timing variations (TTVs)

TTVFaster implements analytic formulae for transit time variations (TTVs) that are accurate to first order in the planet–star mass ratios and in the orbital eccentricities; the implementations are available in several languages, including IDL, Julia, Python and C. These formulae compare well with more computationally expensive N-body integrations in the low-eccentricity, low mass-ratio regime when applied to simulated and to actual multi-transiting Kepler planet systems.

[ascl:1604.011] FDPS: Framework for Developing Particle Simulators

FDPS provides the necessary functions for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as templates independent of the data structure of particles and the functional form of the interaction. It is used to develop particle-based simulation programs for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. FDPS includes templates for domain decomposition, redistribution of particles, and gathering of particle information for interaction calculation. It uses algorithms such as Barnes-Hut tree method for long-range interactions; methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are used for short-range interactions. FDPS reduces the time and effort necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N^2) calculation cost, and produces compiled programs that will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers.

[ascl:1604.009] CCSNMultivar: Core-Collapse Supernova Gravitational Waves

CCSNMultivar aids the analysis of core-collapse supernova gravitational waves. It includes multivariate regression of Fourier transformed or time domain waveforms, hypothesis testing for measuring the influence of physical parameters, and the Abdikamalov et. al. catalog for example use. CCSNMultivar can optionally incorporate additional uncertainty due to detector noise and approximate waveforms from anywhere within the parameter space.

[ascl:1604.008] The Tractor: Probabilistic astronomical source detection and measurement

The Tractor optimizes or samples from models of astronomical objects. The approach is generative: given astronomical sources and a description of the image properties, the code produces pixel-space estimates or predictions of what will be observed in the images. This estimate can be used to produce a likelihood for the observed data given the model: assuming the model space actually includes the truth (it doesn’t, in detail), then if we had the optimal model parameters, the predicted image would differ from the actually observed image only by noise. Given a noise model of the instrument and assuming pixelwise independent noise, the log-likelihood is the negative chi-squared difference: (image - model) / noise.

[ascl:1604.007] DNest3: Diffusive Nested Sampling

DNest3 is a C++ implementation of Diffusive Nested Sampling (ascl:1010.029), a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for Bayesian Inference and Statistical Mechanics. Relative to older DNest versions, DNest3 has improved performance (in terms of the sampling overhead, likelihood evaluations still dominate in general) and is cleaner code: implementing new models should be easier than it was before. In addition, DNest3 is multi-threaded, so one can run multiple MCMC walkers at the same time, and the results will be combined together.

[ascl:1604.006] 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

[ascl:1604.005] Halotools: Galaxy-Halo connection models

Halotools builds and tests models of the galaxy-halo connection and analyzes catalogs of dark matter halos. The core functions of the package include fast generation of synthetic galaxy populations using HODs, abundance matching, and related methods; efficient algorithms for calculating galaxy clustering, lensing, z-space distortions, and other astronomical statistics; a modular, object-oriented framework for designing galaxy evolution models; and end-to-end support for reducing halo catalogs and caching them as hdf5 files.

[ascl:1604.004] magicaxis: Pretty scientific plotting with minor-tick and log minor-tick support

The R suite magicaxis makes useful and pretty plots for scientific plotting and includes functions for base plotting, with particular emphasis on pretty axis labelling in a number of circumstances that are often used in scientific plotting. It also includes functions for generating images and contours that reflect the 2D quantile levels of the data designed particularly for output of MCMC posteriors where visualizing the location of the 68% and 95% 2D quantiles for covariant parameters is a necessary part of the post MCMC analysis, can generate low and high error bars, and allows clipping of values, rejection of bad values, and log stretching.

[ascl:1604.003] LAMBDAR: Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R

LAMBDAR measures galaxy fluxes from an arbitrary FITS image, covering an arbitrary photometric wave-band, when provided all parameters needed to construct galactic apertures at the required locations for multi-band matched aperture galactic photometry. Through sophisticated matched aperture photometry, the package develops robust Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and accurately establishes the physical properties of galactic objects. LAMBDAR was based on a package detailed in Bourne et al. (2012) that determined galactic fluxes in low resolution Herschel images.

[ascl:1604.002] libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

[ascl:1604.001] OpenMHD: Godunov-type code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

OpenMHD is a Godunov-type finite-volume code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). It is written in Fortran 90 and is parallelized by using MPI-2 and OpenMP. The code was originally developed for studying magnetic reconnection problems and has been made publicly available in the hope that others may find it useful.

[ascl:1603.018] PolRadTran: Polarized Radiative Transfer Model Distribution

PolRadTran is a plane-parallel polarized radiative transfer model. It is used to compute the radiance exiting a vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere containing randomly-oriented particles. Both solar and thermal sources of radiation are considered. A direct method of incorporating the polarized scattering information is combined with the doubling and adding method to produce a relatively simple formulation.

[ascl:1603.017] HIIexplorer: Detect and extract integrated spectra of HII regions

HIIexplorer detects and extracts the integrated spectra of HII regions from IFS datacubes. The procedure assumes H ii regions are peaky/isolated structures with a strong ionized gas emission, clearly above the continuum emission and the average ionized gas emission across the galaxy and that H ii regions have a typical physical size of about a hundred or a few hundreds of parsecs, which corresponds to a typical projected size at the distance of the galaxies of a few arcsec for galaxies at z~0.016. All input parameters can be derived from either a visual inspection and/or a statistical analysis of the Hα emission line map. The algorithm produces a segmentation FITS file describing the pixels associated to each H ii region.

[ascl:1603.016] ellc: Light curve model for eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

ellc analyzes the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems. The model represents stars as triaxial ellipsoids, and the apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The code can also calculate the fluxweighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). ellc can model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and can enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing.

[ascl:1603.015] Dedalus: Flexible framework for spectrally solving differential equations

Dedalus solves differential equations using spectral methods. It implements flexible algorithms to solve initial-value, boundary-value, and eigenvalue problems with broad ranges of custom equations and spectral domains. Its primary features include symbolic equation entry, multidimensional parallelization, implicit-explicit timestepping, and flexible analysis with HDF5. The code is written primarily in Python and features an easy-to-use interface. The numerical algorithm produces highly sparse systems for many equations which are efficiently solved using compiled libraries and MPI.

[ascl:1603.014] fibmeasure: Python/Cython module to find the center of back-illuminated optical fibers in metrology images

fibmeasure finds the precise locations of the centers of back-illuminated optical fibers in images. It was developed for astronomical fiber positioning feedback via machine vision cameras and is optimized for high-magnification images where fibers appear as resolvable circles. It was originally written during the design of the WEAVE pick-and-place fiber positioner for the William Herschel Telescope.

[ascl:1603.013] PyGSM: Python interface to the Global Sky Model

PyGSM is a Python interface for the Global Sky Model (GSM, ascl:1011.010). The GSM is a model of diffuse galactic radio emission, constructed from a variety of all-sky surveys spanning the radio band (e.g. Haslam and WMAP). PyGSM uses the GSM to generate all-sky maps in Healpix format of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 94 GHz. The PyGSM module provides visualization utilities, file output in FITS format, and the ability to generate observed skies for a given location and date. PyGSM requires Healpy, PyEphem (ascl:1112.014), and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1603.012] tpipe: Searching radio interferometry data for fast, dispersed transients

Visibilities from radio interferometers have not traditionally been used to study the fast transient sky. Millisecond transients (e.g., fast radio bursts) and periodic sources (e.g., pulsars) have been studied with single-dish radio telescopes and a software stack developed over the past few decades. tpipe is an initial attempt to develop the fast transient algorithms for visibility data. Functions exist for analysis of visibilties, such as reading data, flagging data, applying interferometric gain calibration, and imaging. These functions are given equal footing as time-domain techniques like filters and dedispersion.

[ascl:1603.011] DiskJockey: Protoplanetary disk modeling for dynamical mass derivation

DiskJockey derives dynamical masses for T Tauri stars using the Keplerian motion of their circumstellar disks, applied to radio interferometric data from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The package relies on RADMC-3D (ascl:1202.015) to perform the radiative transfer of the disk model. DiskJockey is designed to work in a parallel environment where the calculations for each frequency channel can be distributed to independent processors. Due to the computationally expensive nature of the radiative synthesis, fitting sizable datasets (e.g., SMA and ALMA) will require a substantial amount of CPU cores to explore a posterior distribution in a reasonable timeframe.

[ascl:1603.010] ExoPriors: Accounting for observational bias of transiting exoplanets

ExoPriors calculates a log-likelihood penalty for an input set of transit parameters to account for observational bias (geometric and signal-to-noise ratio detection bias) of transiting exoplanets. Written in Python, the code calculates this log-likelihood penalty in one of seven user-specified cases specified with Boolean input parameters for geometric and/or SNR bias, grazing or non-grazing events, and occultation events.

[ascl:1603.009] Asfgrid: Asteroseismic parameters for a star

asfgrid computes asteroseismic parameters for a star with given stellar parameters and vice versa. Written in Python, it determines delta_nu, nu_max or masses via interpolation over a grid.

[ascl:1603.008] ROBAST: ROOT-based ray-tracing library for cosmic-ray telescopes

ROBAST (ROOT-based simulator for ray tracing) is a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library developed for wide use in optical simulations of gamma-ray and cosmic-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++ and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT analysis framework, and can build the complex optics geometries typically used in cosmic ray experiments and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes.

[ascl:1603.007] SMARTIES: Spheroids Modelled Accurately with a Robust T-matrix Implementation for Electromagnetic Scattering

SMARTIES calculates the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. This suite of MATLAB codes provides a fully documented implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. Included are scripts that cover a range of scattering problems relevant to nanophotonics and plasmonics, including calculation of far-field scattering and absorption cross-sections for fixed incidence orientation, orientation-averaged cross-sections and scattering matrix, surface-field calculations as well as near-fields, wavelength-dependent near-field and far-field properties, and access to lower-level functions implementing the T-matrix calculations, including the T-matrix elements which may be calculated more accurately than with competing codes.

[ascl:1603.006] FAST-PT: Convolution integrals in cosmological perturbation theory calculator

FAST-PT calculates 1-loop corrections to the matter power spectrum in cosmology. The code utilizes Fourier methods combined with analytic expressions to reduce the computation time down to scale as N log N, where N is the number of grid point in the input linear power spectrum. FAST-PT is extremely fast, enabling mode-coupling integral computations fast enough to embed in Monte Carlo Markov Chain parameter estimation.

[ascl:1603.005] EQUIB: Atomic level populations and line emissivities calculator

The Fortran program EQUIB solves the statistical equilibrium equation for each ion and yields atomic level populations and line emissivities for given physical conditions, namely electron temperature and electron density, appropriate to the zones in an ionized nebula where the ions are expected to exist.

[ascl:1603.004] gPhoton: Time-tagged GALEX photon events analysis tools

Written in Python, gPhoton calibrates and sky-projects the ~1.1 trillion ultraviolet photon events detected by the microchannel plates on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Spacecraft (GALEX), archives these events in a publicly accessible database at the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), and provides tools for working with the database to extract scientific results, particularly over short time domains. The software includes a re-implementation of core functionality of the GALEX mission calibration pipeline to produce photon list files from raw spacecraft data as well as a suite of command line tools to generate calibrated light curves, images, and movies from the MAST database.

[ascl:1603.003] VIP: Vortex Image Processing pipeline for high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets

VIP (Vortex Image Processing pipeline) provides pre- and post-processing algorithms for high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. Written in Python, VIP provides a very flexible framework for data exploration and image processing and supports high-contrast imaging observational techniques, including angular, reference-star and multi-spectral differential imaging. Several post-processing algorithms for PSF subtraction based on principal component analysis are available as well as the LLSG (Local Low-rank plus Sparse plus Gaussian-noise decomposition) algorithm for angular differential imaging. VIP also implements the negative fake companion technique coupled with MCMC sampling for rigorous estimation of the flux and position of potential companions.

[submitted] millennium-tap-query: A Python Tool to Query the Millennium Simulation UWS/TAP client

millennium-tap-query is a simple wrapper for the Python package requests to deal with connections to the Millennium TAP Web Client. With this tool you can perform basic or advanced queries to the Millennium Simulation database and download the data products. millennium-tap-query is similar to the TAP query tool in the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) VOtables package.

[ascl:1603.002] CORBITS: Efficient Geometric Probabilities of Multi-Transiting Exoplanetary Systems

CORBITS (Computed Occurrence of Revolving Bodies for the Investigation of Transiting Systems) computes the probability that any particular group of exoplanets can be observed to transit from a collection of conjectured exoplanets orbiting a star. The efficient, semi-analytical code computes the areas bounded by circular curves on the surface of a sphere by applying elementary differential geometry. CORBITS is faster than previous algorithms, based on comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations, and tests show that it is extremely accurate even for highly eccentric planets.

[ascl:1603.001] SILSS: SPHERE/IRDIS Long-Slit Spectroscopy pipeline

The ESO's VLT/SPHERE instrument includes a unique long-slit spectroscopy (LSS) mode coupled with Lyot coronagraphy in its infrared dual-band imager and spectrograph (IRDIS) for spectral characterization of young, giant exoplanets detected by direct imaging. The SILSS pipeline is a combination of the official SPHERE pipeline and additional custom IDL routines developed within the SPHERE consortium for the speckle subtraction and spectral extraction of a companion's spectrum; it offers a complete end-to-end pipeline, from raw data (science+calibrations) to a final spectrum of the companion. SILSS works on both the low-resolution (LRS) and medium-resolution (MRS) data, and allows correction for some of the known biases of the instrument. Documentation is included in the header of the main routine of the pipeline.

[ascl:1602.021] COLAcode: COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration code

COLAcode is a serial particle mesh-based N-body code illustrating the COLA (COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration) method; it solves for Large Scale Structure (LSS) in a frame that is comoving with observers following trajectories calculated in Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT). It differs from standard N-body code by trading accuracy at small-scales to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is useful for generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing; such catalogs are needed to perform detailed error analysis for ongoing and future surveys of LSS.

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