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[ascl:1810.012] GiRaFFE: General relativistic force-free electrodynamics code

GiRaFFE leverages the Einstein Toolkit's (ascl:1102.014) highly-scalable infrastructure to create large-scale simulations of magnetized plasmas in strong, dynamical spacetimes on adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) grids. It is based on IllinoisGRMHD, a user-friendly, open-source, dynamical-spacetime GRMHD code, and is highly scalable, to tens of thousands of cores.

[ascl:1810.011] Eclairs: Efficient Codes for the LArge scales of the unIveRSe

Eclairs calculates matter power spectrum based on standard perturbation theory and regularized pertubation theory. The codes are written in C++ with a python wrapper which is designed to be easily combined with MCMC samplers.

[ascl:1810.010] ODTBX: Orbit Determination Toolbox

ODTBX (Orbit Determination Toolbox) provides orbit determination analysis, advanced mission simulation, and analysis for concept exploration, proposal, early design phase, and/or rapid design center environments. The core ODTBX functionality is realized through a set of estimation commands that incorporate Monte Carlo data simulation, linear covariance analysis, and measurement processing at a generic level; its functions and utilities are combined in a flexible architecture to allow modular development of navigation algorithms and simulations. ODTBX is written in Matlab and Java.

[ascl:1810.009] PyUltraLight: Pseudo-spectral Python code to compute ultralight dark matter dynamics

PyUltraLight computes non-relativistic ultralight dark matter dynamics in a static spacetime background. It uses pseudo-spectral methods to compute the evolution of a complex scalar field governed by the Schrödinger-Poisson system of coupled differential equations. Computations are performed on a fixed-grid with periodic boundary conditions, allowing for a decomposition of the field in momentum space by way of the discrete Fourier transform. The field is then evolved through a symmetrized split-step Fourier algorithm, in which nonlinear operators are applied in real space, while spatial derivatives are computed in Fourier space. Fourier transforms within PyUltraLight are handled using the pyFFTW pythonic wrapper around FFTW (ascl:1201.015).

[ascl:1810.008] pycraf: Spectrum-management compatibility

The pycraf Python package provides functions and procedures for spectrum-management compatibility studies, such as calculating the interference levels at a radio telescope produced from a radio broadcasting tower. It includes an implementation of ITU-R Recommendation P.452-16 for calculating path attenuation for the distance between an interferer and the victim service. It supports NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data for height-profile generation, includes a full implementation of ITU-R Rec. P.676-10, which provides two atmospheric models to calculate the attenuation for paths through Earth's atmosphere, and provides various antenna patterns necessary for compatibility studies (e.g., RAS, IMT, fixed-service links). The package can also convert power flux densities, field strengths, transmitted and received powers at certain distances and frequencies into each other.

[ascl:1810.007] ARTES: 3D Monte Carlo scattering radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

The 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTES calculates reflected light and thermal radiation in a spherical grid with a parameterized distribution of gas, clouds, hazes, and circumplanetary material. Designed specifically for (polarized) scattered light simulations of planetary atmospheres, it can compute both reflected stellar light and thermal emission from the planet for an arbitrary atmospheric structure and distribution of opacity sources. Multiple scattering, absorption, and polarization are fully treated and the output includes an image, spectrum, or phase curve. Several tools are included to create opacities and scattering matrices for molecules and clouds.

[ascl:1810.006] Echelle++: Generic spectrum simulator

Echelle++ simulates realistic raw spectra based on the Zemax model of any spectrograph, with a particular emphasis on cross-dispersed Echelle spectrographs. The code generates realistic spectra of astronomical and calibration sources, with accurate representation of optical aberrations, the shape of the point spread function, detector characteristics, and photon noise. It produces high-fidelity spectra fast, an important feature when testing data reduction pipelines with a large set of different input spectra, when making critical choices about order spacing in the design phase of the instrument, or while aligning the spectrograph during construction. Echelle++ also works with low resolution, low signal to noise, multi-object, IFU, or long slit spectra, for simulating a wide array of spectrographs.

[ascl:1810.005] STARRY: Analytic computation of occultation light curves

STARRY computes light curves for various applications in astronomy: transits and secondary eclipses of exoplanets, light curves of eclipsing binaries, rotational phase curves of exoplanets, light curves of planet-planet and planet-moon occultations, and more. By modeling celestial body surface maps as sums of spherical harmonics, STARRY does all this analytically and is therefore fast, stable, and differentiable. Coded in C++ but wrapped in Python, STARRY is easy to install and use.

[ascl:1810.004] VaeX: Visualization and eXploration of Out-of-Core DataFrames

VaeX (Visualization and eXploration) interactively visualizes and explores big tabular datasets. It can calculate statistics such as mean, sum, count, and standard deviation on an N-dimensional grid up to a billion (109) objects/rows per second. Visualization is done using histograms, density plots, and 3d volume rendering, allowing interactive exploration of big data. VaeX uses memory mapping, zero memory copy policy and lazy computations for best performance, and integrates well with the Jupyter/IPython notebook/lab ecosystem.

[ascl:1810.003] JETGET: Hydrodynamic jet simulation visualization and analysis

JETGET accesses, visualizes, and analyses (magnetized-)fluid dynamics data stored in Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) and ASCII files. Although JETGET has been optimized to handle data output from jet simulations using the Zeus code (ascl:1306.014) from NCSA, it is also capable of analyzing other data output from simulations using other codes. JETGET can select variables from the data files, render both two- and three-dimensional graphics and analyze and plot important physical quantities. Graphics can be saved in encapsulated Postscript, JPEG, VRML, or saved into an MPEG for later visualization and/or presentations. The strength of JETGET in extracting the physics underlying such phenomena is demonstrated as well as its capabilities in visualizing the 3-dimensional features of the simulated magneto-hydrodynamic jets. The JETGET tool is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses a graphical user interface to manipulate the data. The tool was developed on a LINUX platform and can be run on any platform that supports IDL.

[ascl:1810.002] Barcode: Bayesian reconstruction of cosmic density fields

Barcode (BAyesian Reconstruction of COsmic DEnsity fields) samples the primordial density fields compatible with a set of dark matter density tracers after cosmic evolution observed in redshift space. It uses a redshift space model based on the analytic solution of coherent flows within a Hamiltonian Monte Carlo posterior sampling of the primordial density field; this method is applicable to analytically derivable structure formation models, such as the Zel'dovich approximation, but also higher order schemes such as augmented Lagrangian perturbation theory or even particle mesh models. The algorithm is well-suited for analysis of the dark matter cosmic web implied by the observed spatial distribution of galaxy clusters, such as obtained from X-ray, SZ or weak lensing surveys, as well as that of the intergalactic medium sampled by the Lyman alpha forest. In these cases, virialized motions are negligible and the tracers cannot be modeled as point-like objects. Barcode can be used in all of these contexts as a baryon acoustic oscillation reconstruction algorithm.

[ascl:1810.001] galfast: Milky Way mock catalog generator

galfast generates catalogs for arbitrary, user-supplied Milky Way models, including empirically derived ones. The built-in model set is based on fits to SDSS stellar observations over 8000 deg2 of the sky and includes a three-dimensional dust distribution map. Because of the capability to use empirically derived models, galfast typically produces closer matches to the actual observed counts and color-magnitude diagrams. In particular, galfast-generated catalogs are used to derive the stellar component of “Universe Model” catalogs used by the LSST Project. A key distinguishing characteristic of galfast is its speed. Galfast uses the GPU (with kernels written in NVIDIA C/C++ for CUDA) to offload compute intensive model sampling computations to the GPU, enabling the generation of realistic catalogs to full LSST depth in hours (instead of days or weeks), making it possible to study proposed science cases with high precision.

[ascl:1809.016] RequiSim: Variance weighted overlap calculator

RequiSim computes the Variance Weighted Overlap, which is a measure of the bias on the lensing signal from power spectrum modelling bias for any non-linear model. It assumes that the bias on the power spectrum is Gaussian with a covariance described by a user-provided knowledge matrix that describes the covariance in the bias on the power spectrum. The data from the Euclid wide-field survey are included.

[ascl:1809.015] MrMoose: Multi-Resolution Multi-Object/Origin Spectral Energy distribution fitting procedure

MrMoose (Multi-Resolution Multi-Object/Origin Spectral Energy) fits user-defined models onto a set of multi-wavelength data using a Bayesian framework. The code can handle blended sources, large variation in resolution, and even upper limits consistently. It also generates a series of outputs allowing for an quick interpretation of the results. The code uses emcee (ascl:1303.002), and saves the emcee sampler object, thus allowing users to transfer the output to a personal graphical interface.

[ascl:1809.014] stepped_luneburg: Stacked-based ray tracing code to model a stepped Luneburg lens

stepped_luneburg investigates the scattered light properties of a Luneburg lens approximated as a series of concentric shells with discrete refractive indices. The optical Luneburg lens has promising applications for low-cost, continuous all-sky monitoring to obtain transit light curves of bright, nearby stars. This code implements a stack-based algorithm that tracks all reflected and refracted rays generated at each optical interface of the lens as described by Snell's law. The Luneburg lens model parameters, such as number of lens layers, the power-law that describes the refractive indices, the number of incident rays, and the initial direction of the incident wavefront can be altered to optimize lens performance. The stepped_luneburg module can be imported within the Python environment or used with scripting, and it is accompanied by two other modules, enc_int and int_map, that help the user to determine the resolving power of the lens and the strength of scattered light haloes for the purpose of quality assessment.

[ascl:1809.013] dynesty: Dynamic Nested Sampling package

dynesty is a Dynamic Nested Sampling package for estimating Bayesian posteriors and evidences. dynesty samples from a given distribution when provided with a loglikelihood function, a prior_transform function (that transforms samples from the unit cube to the target prior), and the dimensionality of the parameter space.

[ascl:1809.012] nestcheck: Nested sampling calculations analysis

Nestcheck analyzes nested sampling runs and estimates numerical uncertainties on calculations using them. The package can load results from a number of nested sampling software packages, including MultiNest (ascl:1109.006), PolyChord (ascl:1502.011), dynesty (ascl:1809.013) and perfectns (ascl:1809.005), and offers the flexibility to add input functions for other nested sampling software packages. Nestcheck utilities include error analysis, diagnostic tests, and plots for nested sampling calculations.

[ascl:1809.011] qp: Quantile parametrization for probability distribution functions

qp manipulates parametrizations of 1-dimensional probability distribution functions, as suitable for photo-z PDF compression. The code helps determine a parameterization for storing a catalog of photo-z PDFs that balances the available storage resources against the accuracy of the photo-z PDFs and science products reconstructed from the stored parameters.

[ascl:1809.010] Isca: Idealized global circulation modeling

Isca provides a framework for the idealized modeling of the global circulation of planetary atmospheres at varying levels of complexity and realism. Though Isca is an outgrowth of models designed for Earth's atmosphere, it may readily be extended into other planetary regimes. Various forcing and radiation options are available. At the simple end of the spectrum a Held-Suarez case is available. An idealized grey radiation scheme, a grey scheme with moisture feedback, a two-band scheme and a multi-band scheme are also available, all with simple moist effects and astronomically-based solar forcing. At the complex end of the spectrum the framework provides a direct connection to comprehensive atmospheric general circulation models.

[ascl:1809.009] NEBULA: Radiative transfer code of ionized nebulae at radio wavelengths

NEBULA performs the radiative transfer of the 3He+ hyperfine transition, radio recombination lines (RRLs), and free-free continuum emission through a model nebula. The model nebula is composed of only H and He within a three-dimension Cartesian grid with arbitrary density, temperature, and ionization structure. The 3He+ line is assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), but non-LTE effects and pressure broadening from electron impacts can be included for the RRLs. All spectra are broadened by thermal and microturbulent motions.

[ascl:1809.008] PyQSOFit: Python code to fit the spectrum of quasars

The Python QSO fitting code (PyQSOFit) measures spectral properties of quasars. Based on Shen's IDL version, this code decomposes different components in the quasar spectrum, e.g., host galaxy, power-law continuum, Fe II component, and emission lines. In addition, it can run Monto Carlo iterations using flux randomization to estimate the uncertainties.

[ascl:1809.007] surfinBH: Surrogate final black hole properties for mergers of binary black holes

surfinBH predicts the final mass, spin and recoil velocity of the remnant of a binary black hole merger. Trained directly against numerical relativity simulations, these models are extremely accurate, reproducing the results of the simulations at the same level of accuracy as the simulations themselves. Fits such as these play a crucial role in waveform modeling and tests of general relativity with gravitational waves, performed by LIGO.

[ascl:1809.006] spops: Spinning black-hole binary population synthesis

spops is a database of populations synthesis simulations of spinning black-hole binary systems, together with a python module to query it. Data are obtained with the startrack and precession [ascl:1611.004] numerical codes to consistently evolve binary stars from formation to gravitational-wave detection. spops allows quick exploration of the interplay between stellar physics and black-hole spin dynamics.

[ascl:1809.005] perfectns: "Perfect" dynamic and standard nested sampling for spherically symmetric likelihoods and priors

perfectns performs dynamic nested sampling and standard nested sampling for spherically symmetric likelihoods and priors, and analyses the samples produced. The spherical symmetry allows the nested sampling algorithm to be followed “perfectly” - i.e. without implementation-specific errors correlations between samples. It is intended for use in research into the statistical properties of nested sampling, and to provide a benchmark for testing the performance of nested sampling software packages used for practical problems - which rely on numerical techniques to produce approximately uncorrelated samples.

[ascl:1809.004] VBBINARYLENSING: Microlensing light-curve computation

VBBinaryLensing forward models gravitational microlensing events using the advanced contour integration method; it supports single and binary lenses. The lens map is inverted on a collection of points on the source boundary to obtain a corresponding collection of points on the boundaries of the images from which the area of the images can be recovered by use of Green’s theorem. The code takes advantage of a number of techniques to make contour integration much more efficient, including using a parabolic correction to increase the accuracy of the summation, introducing an error estimate on each arc of the boundary to enable defining an optimal sampling, and allowing the inclusion of limb darkening. The code is written as a C++ library and wrapped as a Python package, and can be called from either C++ or Python.

[ascl:1809.003] PASTA: Python Astronomical Stacking Tool Array

PASTA performs median stacking of astronomical sources. Written in Python, it can filter sources, provide stack statistics, generate Karma annotations, format source lists, and read information from stacked Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) images. PASTA was originally written to examine polarization stack properties and includes a Monte Carlo modeler for obtaining true polarized intensity from the observed polarization of a stack. PASTA is also useful as a generic stacking tool, even if polarization properties are not being examined.

[ascl:1809.002] PCCDPACK: Polarimetry with CCD

PCCDPACK analyzes polarimetry data. The set of routines is written in CL-IRAF (including compiled Fortran codes) and analyzes dozens of point objects simultaneously on the same CCD image. A subpackage, specpol, is included to analyze spectropolarimetry data.

[ascl:1809.001] LEMON: Differential photometry pipeline

LEMON is a differential-photometry pipeline, written in Python, that determines the changes in the brightness of astronomical objects over time and compiles their measurements into light curves. This code makes it possible to completely reduce thousands of FITS images of time series in a matter of only a few hours, requiring minimal user interaction.

[ascl:1808.011] Robbie: Radio transients and variables detection workflow

Robbie automates cataloging sources, finding variables, and identifying transients in the image domain. It works in a batch processing paradigm with a modular design so components can be swapped out or upgraded to adapt to different input data while retaining a consistent and coherent methodological approach. Robbie is based on commonly used and open software, including AegeanTools (ascl:1212.009) and STILS/TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010).

[ascl:1808.010] hi_class: Horndeski in the Cosmic Linear Anisotropy Solving System

hi_class implements Horndeski's theory of gravity in the modern Cosmic Linear Anisotropy Solving System (ascl:1106.020). It can be used to compute any cosmological observable at the level of background or linear perturbations, such as cosmological distances, cosmic microwave background, matter power and number count spectra (including relativistic effects). hi_class can be readily interfaced with Monte Python (ascl:1307.002) to test Gravity and Dark Energy models.

[ascl:1808.009] py-sdm: Support Distribution Machines

py-sdm (Support Distribution Machines) is a Python implementation of nonparametric nearest-neighbor-based estimators for divergences between distributions for machine learning on sets of data rather than individual data points. It treats points of sets of data as samples from some unknown probability distribution and then statistically estimates the distance between those distributions, such as the KL divergence, the closely related Rényi divergence, L2 distance, or other similar distances.

[ascl:1808.008] PyMieDap: Python Mie Doubling Adding Program

PyMieDAP (Python Mie Doubling Adding Program) makes light scattering computations with Mie scattering and radiative transfer computations with full orders of scattering and taking into account the polarization of the light scattered. Full planet modeling at any phase angle is possible. With the included subpackage exopy, it is also possible to simulate systems with a star, a planet and a possible moon.

[ascl:1808.007] 2DSF: Vectorized Structure Function Algorithm

The vectorized physical domain structure function (SF) algorithm calculates the velocity anisotropy within two-dimensional molecular line emission observations. The vectorized approach is significantly faster than brute force iterative algorithms and is very efficient for even relatively large images. Furthermore, unlike frequency domain algorithms which require the input data to be fully integrable, this algorithm, implemented in Python, has no such requirements, making it a robust tool for observations with irregularities such as asymmetric boundaries and missing data.

[ascl:1808.006] Fips: An OpenGL based FITS viewer

FIPS is a cross-platform FITS viewer with a responsive user interface. Unlike other FITS viewers, FIPS uses GPU hardware via OpenGL to provide functionality such as zooming, panning and level adjustments. OpenGL 2.1 and later is supported. FIPS supports all 2D image formats except floating point formats on OpenGL 2.1. FITS image extension has basic limited support.

[ascl:1808.005] hfof: Friends-of-Friends via spatial hashing

hfof is a 3-d friends-of-friends (FoF) cluster finder with Python bindings based on a fast spatial hashing algorithm that identifies connected sets of points where the point-wise connections are determined by a fixed spatial distance. This technique sorts particles into fine cells sufficiently compact to guarantee their cohabitants are linked, and uses locality sensitive hashing to search for neighboring (blocks of) cells. Tests on N-body simulations of up to a billion particles exhibit speed increases of factors up to 20x compared with FOF via trees, and is consistently complete in less than the time of a k-d tree construction, giving it an intrinsic advantage over tree-based methods.

[ascl:1808.004] ImPlaneIA: Image Plane Approach to Interferometric Analysis

Aperture masking interferometric data analysis involves measuring phases and amplitudes of fringes formed by interference between holes in the pupil mask. These fringe observables can be measured by computing an analytic model of the point spread function and fitting the relevant set of spatial frequencies directly in the image plane, without recourse to numerical Fourier transforms. The ImPlaneIA pipeline converts aperture masking images to fringe observables by fitting fringes in the image plane, calibrates data from a target of interest with one or more point source calibrators, and contains some basic model-fitting routines. The pipeline can accept different mask geometries, instruments, and observing modes.

[ascl:1808.003] CPF: Corral Pipeline Framework

Corral generates astronomical pipelines. Data processing pipelines represent an important slice of the astronomical software library that include chains of processes that transform raw data into valuable information via data reduction and analysis. Written in Python, Corral features a Model-View-Controller design pattern on top of an SQL Relational Database capable of handling custom data models, processing stages, and communication alerts. It also provides automatic quality and structural metrics based on unit testing. The Model-View-Controller provides concept separation between the user logic and the data models, delivering at the same time multi-processing and distributed computing capabilities.

[ascl:1808.002] rsigma: Resonant disturbance

rsigma calculates the resonant disturbing function, R(sigma), for a massless particle in an arbitrary orbit perturbed by a planet in circular orbit. This function defines the strength of the resonance (its semi-amplitude) and the location of the stable equilibrium points (the minima). It depends on the variable sigma called critical angle and on the particle's orbital elements a, e, i and the argument of the perihelion. R(sigma) is numerically calculated and the code is valid for arbitrary eccentricities and inclinations, including retrograde orbits.

[ascl:1808.001] Barycorrpy: Barycentric velocity calculation and leap second management

barycorrpy (BCPy) is a Python implementation of Wright and Eastman's 2014 code (ascl:1807.017) that calculates precise barycentric corrections well below the 1 cm/s level. This level of precision is required in the search for 1 Earth mass planets in the Habitable Zones of Sun-like stars by the Radial Velocity (RV) method, where the maximum semi-amplitude is about 9 cm/s. BCPy was developed for the pipeline for the next generation Doppler Spectrometers - Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF) and NEID. An automated leap second management routine improves upon the one available in Astropy. It checks for and downloads a new leap second file before converting from the UT time scale to TDB. The code also includes a converter for JDUTC to BJDTDB.

[submitted] 3D texturized model of MARS (MOLA) regions

The Matlab Tool generates a 3D model (WRL, texturized in height false color map) of a defined region of the Mars surface. It defines the region of interest of the Mars surface (by Lat Long), a resolution of the MOLA DTMs to be considered (with a minimum px onground of 468 m), a scale factor to be multiplied to the height of the surface to improve features visibility for bumping or shadowing effect.

[ascl:1807.033] LSC: Supervised classification of time-series variable stars

LSC (LINEAR Supervised Classification) trains a number of classifiers, including random forest and K-nearest neighbor, to classify variable stars and compares the results to determine which classifier is most successful. Written in R, the package includes anomaly detection code for testing the application of the selected classifier to new data, thus enabling the creation of highly reliable data sets of classified variable stars.

[ascl:1807.032] SSMM: Slotted Symbolic Markov Modeling for classifying variable star signatures

SSMM (Slotted Symbolic Markov Modeling) reduces time-domain stellar variable observations to classify stellar variables. The method can be applied to both folded and unfolded data, and does not require time-warping for waveform alignment. Written in Matlab, the performance of the supervised classification code is quantifiable and consistent, and the rate at which new data is processed is dependent only on the computational processing power available.

[ascl:1807.031] xGDS: Exploration Ground Data Systems

xGDS (Exploration Ground Data Systems) synthesizes real world data (from sensors, robots, ROVs, mobile devices, etc) and human observations into rich, digital maps and displays for analysis, decision making, and collaboration. xGDS processes and maps data (including video) in real-time during operations and uses it to support live role-based geolocated note taking. Notes can be used to search for and display important data. The software enables real-time analysis of data, permitting one to make inferences and plan new data collection operations while still in the field.

[ascl:1807.030] ASP: Ames Stereo Pipeline

ASP (Ames Stereo Pipeline) provides fully automated geodesy and stereogrammetry tools for processing stereo imagery captured from satellites (around Earth and other planets), robotic rovers, aerial cameras, and historical imagery, with and without accurate camera pose information. It produces cartographic products, including digital elevation models (DEMs), ortho-projected imagery, 3D models, and bundle-adjusted networks of cameras. ASP's data products are suitable for science analysis, mission planning, and public outreach.

[ascl:1807.029] EVEREST: Tools for de-trending stellar photometry

EVEREST (EPIC Variability Extraction and Removal for Exoplanet Science Targets) removes instrumental noise from light curves with pixel level decorrelation and Gaussian processes. The code, written in Python, generates the EVEREST catalog and offers tools for accessing and interacting with the de-trended light curves. EVEREST exploits correlations across the pixels on the CCD to remove systematics introduced by the spacecraft’s pointing error. For K2, it yields light curves with precision comparable to that of the original Kepler mission. Interaction with the EVEREST catalog catalog is available via the command line and through the Python interface. Though written for K2, EVEREST can be applied to additional surveys, such as the TESS mission, to correct for instrumental systematics and enable the detection of low signal-to-noise transiting exoplanets.

[ascl:1807.028] ktransit: Exoplanet transit modeling tool in python

The routines in ktransit create and fit a transiting planet model. The underlying model is a Fortran implementation of the Mandel & Agol (2002) limb darkened transit model. The code calculates a full orbital model and eccentricity can be allowed to vary; radial velocity data can also be calculated via the model and included in the fit.

[ascl:1807.027] kplr: Tools for working with Kepler data using Python

kplr provides a lightweight Pythonic interface to the catalog of planet candidates (Kepler Objects of Interest [KOIs]) in the NASA Exoplanet Archive and the data stored in the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). kplr automatically supports loading Kepler data using pyfits (ascl:1207.009) and supports two types of data: light curves and target pixel files.

[ascl:1807.026] SENR: Simple, Efficient Numerical Relativity

SENR (Simple, Efficient Numerical Relativity) provides the algorithmic framework that combines the C codes generated by NRPy+ (ascl:1807.025) into a functioning numerical relativity code. It is part of the numerical relativity code package SENR/NRPy+. The package extends previous implementations of the BSSN reference-metric formulation to a much broader class of curvilinear coordinate systems, making it suitable for modeling physical configurations with approximate or exact symmetries, such as modeling black hole dynamics.

[ascl:1807.025] NRPy+: Code generator for Numerical Relativity

NRPy+ (Python-based Code generation for Numerical Relativity and Beyond) generates highly-optimized C code from complex tensorial expressions input in Einstein-like notation. NRPy+ uses SymPy as its computer algebra system backend. It is part of the NRPy+/SENR numerical relativity code package for solving Einstein's equations of general relativity to model compact objects at about 1/100 the cost in memory of more traditional, AMR-based numerical relativity codes, thus allowing desktop computers to be used for gravitational wave astrophysics.

[ascl:1807.024] TBI: Three-Body Integration

Three-Body Integration performs numerical n-body simulations for mapping conditions for close approaches for the relevant parameter space of configurations and mass values of two white dwarfs and a third star. Low tertiary masses of 0.1M⊙ can be studied, and the collision probability can be estimated with good confidence for the case of nearly equal mass white dwarfs.

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