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Results 201-250 of 1674 (1643 ASCL, 31 submitted)

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[ascl:1705.003] demc2: Differential evolution Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimator

demc2, also abbreviated as DE-MCMC, is a differential evolution Markov Chain parameter estimation library written in R for adaptive MCMC on real parameter spaces.

[ascl:1705.002] DMATIS: Dark Matter ATtenuation Importance Sampling

DMATIS (Dark Matter ATtenuation Importance Sampling) calculates the trajectories of DM particles that propagate in the Earth's crust and the lead shield to reach the DAMIC detector using an importance sampling Monte-Carlo simulation. A detailed Monte-Carlo simulation avoids the deficiencies of the SGED/KS method that uses a mean energy loss description to calculate the lower bound on the DM-proton cross section. The code implementing the importance sampling technique makes the brute-force Monte-Carlo simulation of moderately strongly interacting DM with nucleons computationally feasible. DMATIS is written in Python 3 and MATHEMATICA.

[ascl:1705.001] COSMOS: Carnegie Observatories System for MultiObject Spectroscopy

COSMOS (Carnegie Observatories System for MultiObject Spectroscopy) reduces multislit spectra obtained with the IMACS and LDSS3 spectrographs on the Magellan Telescopes. It can be used for the quick-look analysis of data at the telescope as well as for pipeline reduction of large data sets. COSMOS is based on a precise optical model of the spectrographs, which allows (after alignment and calibration) an accurate prediction of the location of spectra features. This eliminates the line search procedure which is fundamental to many spectral reduction programs, and allows a robust data pipeline to be run in an almost fully automatic mode, allowing large amounts of data to be reduced with minimal intervention.

[ascl:1704.014] Multipoles: Potential gain for binary lens estimation

Multipoles, written in Python, calculates the quadrupole and hexadecapole approximations of the finite-source magnification: quadrupole (Wk,rho,Gamma) and hexadecapole (Wk,rho,Gamma). The code is efficient and faster than previously available methods, and could be generalized for use on large portions of the light curves.

[ascl:1704.013] Difference-smoothing: Measuring time delay from light curves

The Difference-smoothing MATLAB code measures the time delay from the light curves of images of a gravitationally lendsed quasar. It uses a smoothing timescale free parameter, generates more realistic synthetic light curves to estimate the time delay uncertainty, and uses X2 plot to assess the reliability of a time delay measurement as well as to identify instances of catastrophic failure of the time delay estimator. A systematic bias in the measurement of time delays for some light curves can be eliminated by applying a correction to each measured time delay.

[ascl:1704.012] XID+: Next generation XID development

XID+ is a prior-based source extraction tool which carries out photometry in the Herschel SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) maps at the positions of known sources. It uses a probabilistic Bayesian framework that provides a natural framework in which to include prior information, and uses the Bayesian inference tool Stan to obtain the full posterior probability distribution on flux estimates.

[ascl:1704.011] VULCAN: Chemical Kinetics For Exoplanetary Atmospheres

VULCAN describes gaseous chemistry from 500 to 2500 K using a reduced C-H-O chemical network with about 300 reactions. It uses eddy diffusion to mimic atmospheric dynamics and excludes photochemistry, and can be used to examine the theoretical trends produced when the temperature-pressure profile and carbon-to-oxygen ratio are varied.

[ascl:1704.010] A-Track: Detecting Moving Objects in FITS images

A-Track is a fast, open-source, cross-platform pipeline for detecting moving objects (asteroids and comets) in sequential telescope images in FITS format. The moving objects are detected using a modified line detection algorithm.

[ascl:1704.009] Photo-z-SQL: Photometric redshift estimation framework

Photo-z-SQL is a flexible template-based photometric redshift estimation framework that can be seamlessly integrated into a SQL database (or DB) server and executed on demand in SQL. The DB integration eliminates the need to move large photometric datasets outside a database for redshift estimation, and uses the computational capabilities of DB hardware. Photo-z-SQL performs both maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation and handles inputs of variable photometric filter sets and corresponding broad-band magnitudes.

[ascl:1704.008] Transit: Radiative-transfer code for planetary atmospheres

Transit calculates the transmission or emission spectrum of a planetary atmosphere with application to extrasolar-planet transit and eclipse observations, respectively. It computes the spectra by solving the one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer equation for an atmospheric model.

[ascl:1704.007] PySM: Python Sky Model

PySM generates full-sky simulations of Galactic foregrounds in intensity and polarization relevant for CMB experiments. The components simulated are thermal dust, synchrotron, AME, free-free, and CMB at a given Nside, with an option to integrate over a top hat bandpass, to add white instrument noise, and to smooth with a given beam. PySM is based on the large-scale Galactic part of Planck Sky Model code and uses some of its inputs

[ascl:1704.006] Quickclump: Identify clumps within a 3D FITS datacube

Quickclump finds clumps in a 3D FITS datacube. It is a fast, accurate, and automated tool written in Python. Though Quickclump is primarily intended for decomposing observations of interstellar clouds into individual clumps, it can also be used for finding clumps in any 3D rectangular data.

[ascl:1704.005] VaST: Variability Search Toolkit

VaST (Variability Search Toolkit) finds variable objects on a series of astronomical images in FITS format. The software performs object detection and aperture photometry using SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) on each image, cross-matches lists of detected stars, performs magnitude calibration with respect to the first (reference) image and constructs a lightcurve for each object. The sigma-magnitude, Stetson's L variability index, Robust Median Statistic (RoMS) and other plots may be used to visually identify variable star candidates. The two distinguishing features of VaST are its ability to perform accurate aperture photometry of images obtained with non-linear detectors and to handle complex image distortions. VaST can be used in cases of unstable PSF (e.g., bad guiding or with digitized wide-field photographic images), and has been successfully applied to images obtained with telescopes ranging from 0.08 to 2.5m in diameter equipped with a variety of detectors including CCD, CMOS, MIC and photographic plates.

[ascl:1704.004] STATCONT: Statistical continuum level determination method for line-rich sources

STATCONT determines the continuum emission level in line-rich spectral data by inspecting the intensity distribution of a given spectrum by using different statistical approaches. The sigma-clipping algorithm provides the most accurate continuum level determination, together with information on the uncertainty in its determination; this uncertainty is used to correct the final continuum emission level. In general, STATCONT obtains accuracies of < 10 % in the continuum determination, and < 5 % in most cases. The main products of the software are the continuum emission level, together with its uncertainty, and data cubes containing only spectral line emission, i.e. continuum-subtracted data cubes. STATCONT also includes the option to estimate the spectral index or variation of the continuum emission with frequency.

[ascl:1704.003] Shwirl: Meaningful coloring of spectral cube data with volume rendering

Shwirl visualizes spectral data cubes with meaningful coloring methods. The program has been developed to investigate transfer functions, which combines volumetric elements (or voxels) to set the color, and graphics shaders, functions used to compute several properties of the final image such as color, depth, and/or transparency, as enablers for scientific visualization of astronomical data. The program uses Astropy (ascl:1304.002) to handle FITS files and World Coordinate System, Qt (and PyQt) for the user interface, and VisPy, an object-oriented Python visualization library binding onto OpenGL.

[ascl:1704.002] UDAT: A multi-purpose data analysis tool

UDAT is a pattern recognition tool for mass analysis of various types of data, including image and audio. Based on its WND-CHARM (ascl:1312.002) prototype, UDAT computed a large set of numerical content descriptors from each file it analyzes, and selects the most informative features using statistical analysis. The tool can perform automatic classification of galaxy images by training with annotated galaxy images. It also has unsupervised learning capabilities, such as query-by-example of galaxies based on morphology. That is, given an input galaxy image of interest, the tool can search through a large database of images to retrieve the galaxies that are the most similar to the query image. The downside of the tool is its computational complexity, which in most cases will require a small or medium cluster.

[ascl:1704.001] pwkit: Astronomical utilities in Python

pwkit is a collection of miscellaneous astronomical utilities in Python, with an emphasis on radio astronomy, reading and writing various data formats, and convenient command-line utilities. Utilities include basic astronomical calculations, data visualization tools such as mapping arbitrary data to color scales and tracing contours, and data input and output utilities such as streaming output from other programs.

[ascl:1703.015] Charm: Cosmic history agnostic reconstruction method

Charm (cosmic history agnostic reconstruction method) reconstructs the cosmic expansion history in the framework of Information Field Theory. The reconstruction is performed via the iterative Wiener filter from an agnostic or from an informative prior. The charm code allows one to test the compatibility of several different data sets with the LambdaCDM model in a non-parametric way.

[ascl:1703.014] MC-SPAM: Monte-Carlo Synthetic-Photometry/Atmosphere-Model

MC-SPAM (Monte-Carlo Synthetic-Photometry/Atmosphere-Model) generates limb-darkening coefficients from models that are comparable to transit photometry; it extends the original SPAM algorithm by Howarth (2011) by taking in consideration the uncertainty on the stellar and transit parameters of the system under analysis.

[ascl:1703.013] Atmospheric Athena: 3D Atmospheric escape model with ionizing radiative transfer

Atmospheric Athena simulates hydrodynamic escape from close-in giant planets in 3D. It uses the Athena hydrodynamics code (ascl:1010.014) with a new ionizing radiative transfer implementation to self-consistently model photoionization driven winds from the planet. The code is fully compatible with static mesh refinement and MPI parallelization and can handle arbitrary planet potentials and stellar initial conditions.

[ascl:1703.012] ICICLE: Initial Conditions for Isolated CoLlisionless systEms

ICICLE (Initial Conditions for Isolated CoLlisionless systEms) generates stable initial conditions for isolated collisionless systems that can then be used in NBody simulations. It supports the Navarro-Frenk-White, Hernquist, King and Einasto density profiles.

[ascl:1703.011] QtClassify: IFS data emission line candidates classifier

QtClassify is a GUI that helps classify emission lines found in integral field spectroscopic data. Input needed is a datacube as well as a catalog with emission lines and a signal-to-noise cube, such at that created by LSDCat (ascl:1612.002). The main idea is to take each detected line and guess what line it could be (and thus the redshift of the object). You would expect to see other lines that might not have been detected but are visible in the cube if you know where to look, which is why parts of the spectrum are shown where other lines are expected. In addition, monochromatic layers of the datacube are displayed, making it easy to spot additional emission lines.

[ascl:1703.010] TransitSOM: Self-Organizing Map for Kepler and K2 transits

A self-organizing map (SOM) can be used to identify planetary candidates from Kepler and K2 datasets with accuracies near 90% in distinguishing known Kepler planets from false positives. TransitSOM classifies a Kepler or K2 lightcurve using a self-organizing map (SOM) created and pre-trained using PyMVPA (ascl:1703.009). It includes functions for users to create their own SOMs.

[ascl:1703.009] PyMVPA: MultiVariate Pattern Analysis in Python

PyMVPA eases statistical learning analyses of large datasets. It offers an extensible framework with a high-level interface to a broad range of algorithms for classification, regression, feature selection, data import and export. It is designed to integrate well with related software packages, such as scikit-learn, shogun, and MDP.

[ascl:1703.008] exorings: Exoring Transit Properties

Exorings is suitable for surveying entire catalogs of transiting planet candidates for exoring candidates, providing a subset of objects worthy of more detailed light curve analysis. Moreover, it is highly suited for uncovering evidence of a population of ringed planets by comparing the radius anomaly and PR-effects in ensemble studies.

[ascl:1703.007] sidm-nbody: Monte Carlo N-body Simulation for Self-Interacting Dark Matter

Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) is a hypothetical model for cold dark matter in the Universe. A strong interaction between dark matter particles introduce a different physics inside dark-matter haloes, making the density profile cored, reduce the number of subhaloes, and trigger gravothermal collapse. sidm-nbody is an N-body simulation code with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo scattering for self interaction, and some codes to analyse gravothermal collapse of isolated haloes. The N-body simulation is based on GADGET 1.1.

[ascl:1703.006] SNRPy: Supernova remnant evolution modeling

SNRPy (Super Nova Remnant Python) models supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and is useful for understanding SNR evolution and to model observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs and includes alternate evolutionary models, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity vs. time, SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum.

[ascl:1703.005] starsense_algorithms: Performance evaluation of various star sensors

The Matlab starsense_algorithms package evaluates the performance of various star sensors through the implementation of centroiding, geometric voting and QUEST algorithms. The physical parameters of a star sensor are parametrized and by changing these parameters, performance estimators such as sky coverage, memory requirement, and timing requirements can be estimated for the selected star sensor.

[ascl:1703.004] PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE: Automated photometry pipeline

PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE (PP) provides calibrated photometry from imaging data obtained with small to medium-sized observatories. PP uses Source Extractor (ascl:1010.064) and SCAMP (ascl:1010.063) to register the image data and perform aperture photometry. Calibration is obtained through matching of field stars with reliable photometric catalogs. PP has been specifically designed for the measurement of asteroid photometry, but can also be used to obtain photometry of fixed sources.

[ascl:1703.003] Corrfunc: Blazing fast correlation functions on the CPU

Corrfunc is a suite of high-performance clustering routines. The code can compute a variety of spatial correlation functions on Cartesian geometry as well Landy-Szalay calculations for spatial and angular correlation functions on a spherical geometry and is useful for, for example, exploring the galaxy-halo connection. The code is written in C and can be used on the command-line, through the supplied python extensions, or the C API.

[ascl:1703.002] COCOA: Simulating Observations of Star Cluster Simulations

COCOA (Cluster simulatiOn Comparison with ObservAtions) creates idealized mock photometric observations using results from numerical simulations of star cluster evolution. COCOA is able to present the output of realistic numerical simulations of star clusters carried out using Monte Carlo or N-body codes in a way that is useful for direct comparison with photometric observations. The code can simulate optical observations from simulation snapshots in which positions and magnitudes of objects are known. The parameters for simulating the observations can be adjusted to mimic telescopes of various sizes. COCOA also has a photometry pipeline that can use standalone versions of DAOPHOT (ascl:1104.011) and ALLSTAR to produce photometric catalogs for all observed stars.

[ascl:1703.001] Larch: X-ray Analysis for Synchrotron Applications using Python

Larch is an open-source library and toolkit written in Python for processing and analyzing X-ray spectroscopic data. The primary emphasis is on X-ray spectroscopic and scattering data collected at modern synchrotron sources. Larch provides a wide selection of general-purpose processing, analysis, and visualization tools for processing X-ray data; its related target application areas include X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps, quantitative X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and X-ray standing waves and surface scattering. Larch provides a complete set of XAFS Analysis tools and has support for visualizing and analyzing XRF maps and spectra, and additional tools for X-ray spectral analysis, data handling, and general-purpose data modeling.

[submitted] KSTAT

KSTAT calculates the 2 and 3-point correlation functions in discreet point data. These include the two-point correlation function in 2 and 3-dimensions, the anisotripic 2PCF decomposed in either sigma-pi or Kazin's dist. mu projection.

The 3-point correlation function can also work in anisotropic coordinates (currently under development). The code is based on kd-tree structures and is parallelized using a mixture of MPI and OpenMP.

I created these codes as I have found it difficult in the past find similar ones freely available in the public domain. I hope to keep developing them, so please send me bug fixes,suggestions, comments/criticisms to csabiu@gmail.com

[ascl:1702.012] GRIM: General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics

GRIM (General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics) evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Non-ideal effects are modeled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. GRIM, which runs on CPUs as well as on GPUs, combines time evolution and primitive variable inversion needed for conservative schemes into a single step using only the residuals of the governing equations as inputs. This enables the code to be physics agnostic as well as flexible regarding time-stepping schemes.

[ascl:1702.011] Chempy: A flexible chemical evolution model for abundance fitting

Chempy models Galactic chemical evolution (GCE); it is a parametrized open one-zone model within a Bayesian framework. A Chempy model is specified by a set of 5-10 parameters that describe the effective galaxy evolution along with the stellar and star-formation physics: e.g. the star-formation history (SFH), the feedback efficiency, the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and the incidence of supernova of type Ia (SN Ia). Chempy can sample the posterior probability distribution in the full model parameter space and test data-model matches for different nucleosynthetic yield sets, performing essentially as a chemical evolution fitting tool. Chempy can be used to confront predictions from stellar nucleosynthesis with complex abundance data sets and to refine the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of stellar systems.

[ascl:1702.010] streamgap-pepper: Effects of peppering streams with many small impacts

streamgap-pepper computes the effect of subhalo fly-bys on cold tidal streams based on the action-angle representation of streams. A line-of-parallel-angle approach is used to calculate the perturbed distribution function of a given stream segment by undoing the effect of all impacts. This approach allows one to compute the perturbed stream density and track in any coordinate system in minutes for realizations of the subhalo distribution down to 10^5 Msun, accounting for the stream's internal dispersion and overlapping impacts. This code uses galpy (ascl:1411.008) and the streampepperdf.py galpy extension, which implements the fast calculation of the perturbed stream structure.

[ascl:1702.009] stream-stream: Stellar and dark-matter streams interactions

Stream-stream analyzes the interaction between a stellar stream and a disrupting dark-matter halo. It requires galpy (ascl:1411.008), NEMO (ascl:1010.051), and the usual common scientific Python packages.

[ascl:1702.008] HOURS: Simulation and analysis software for the KM3NeT

The Hellenic Open University Reconstruction & Simulation (HOURS) software package contains a realistic simulation package of the detector response of very large (km3-scale) underwater neutrino telescopes, including an accurate description of all the relevant physical processes, the production of signal and background as well as several analysis strategies for triggering and pattern recognition, event reconstruction, tracking and energy estimation. HOURS also provides tools for simulating calibration techniques and other studies for estimating the detector sensitivity to several neutrino sources.

[ascl:1702.007] KEPLER: General purpose 1D multizone hydrodynamics code

KEPLER is a general purpose stellar evolution/explosion code that incorporates implicit hydrodynamics and a detailed treatment of nuclear burning processes. It has been used to study the complete evolution of massive and supermassive stars, all major classes of supernovae, hydrostatic and explosive nucleosynthesis, and x- and gamma-ray bursts on neutron stars and white dwarfs.

[ascl:1702.006] GalaxyGAN: Generative Adversarial Networks for recovery of galaxy features

GalaxyGAN uses Generative Adversarial Networks to reliably recover features in images of galaxies. The package uses machine learning to train on higher quality data and learns to recover detailed features such as galaxy morphology by effectively building priors. This method opens up the possibility of recovering more information from existing and future imaging data.

[ascl:1702.005] JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

[ascl:1702.004] Validation: Codes to compare simulation data to various observations

Validation provides codes to compare several observations to simulated data with stellar mass and star formation rate, simulated data stellar mass function with observed stellar mass function from PRIMUS or SDSS-GALEX in several redshift bins from 0.01-1.0, and simulated data B band luminosity function with observed stellar mass function, and to create plots for various attributes, including stellar mass functions, and stellar mass to halo mass. These codes can model predictions (in some cases alongside observational data) to test other mock catalogs.

[ascl:1702.003] juwvid: Julia code for time-frequency analysis

Juwvid performs time-frequency analysis. Written in Julia, it uses a modified version of the Wigner distribution, the pseudo Wigner distribution, and the short-time Fourier transform from MATLAB GPL programs, tftb-0.2. The modification includes the zero-padding FFT, the non-uniform FFT, the adaptive algorithm by Stankovic, Dakovic, Thayaparan 2013, the S-method, the L-Wigner distribution, and the polynomial Wigner-Ville distribution.

[ascl:1702.002] corner.py: Corner plots

corner.py uses matplotlib to visualize multidimensional samples using a scatterplot matrix. In these visualizations, each one- and two-dimensional projection of the sample is plotted to reveal covariances. corner.py was originally conceived to display the results of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations and the defaults are chosen with this application in mind but it can be used for displaying many qualitatively different samples. An earlier version of corner.py was known as triangle.py.

[ascl:1702.001] ORBE: Orbital integrator for educational purposes

ORBE performs numerical integration of an arbitrary planetary system composed by a central star and up to 100 planets and minor bodies. ORBE calculates the orbital evolution of a system of bodies by means of the computation of the time evolution of their orbital elements. It is easy to use and is suitable for educational use by undergraduate students in the classroom as a first approach to orbital integrators.

[ascl:1701.012] SONG: Second Order Non-Gaussianity

SONG computes the non-linear evolution of the Universe in order to predict cosmological observables such as the bispectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). More precisely, it is a second-order Boltzmann code, as it solves the Einstein and Boltzmann equations up to second order in the cosmological perturbations.

[ascl:1701.011] GWFrames: Manipulate gravitational waveforms

GWFrames eliminates all rotational behavior, thus simplifying the waveform as much as possible and allowing direct generalizations of methods for analyzing nonprecessing systems. In the process, the angular velocity of a waveform is introduced, which also has important uses, such as supplying a partial solution to an important inverse problem.

[ascl:1701.010] kcorrect: Calculate K-corrections between observed and desired bandpasses

kcorrect fits very restricted spectral energy distribution models to galaxy photometry or spectra in the restframe UV, optical and near-infrared. The main purpose of the fits are for calculating K-corrections. The templates used for the fits may also be interpreted physically, since they are based on the Bruzual-Charlot stellar evolution synthesis codes. Thus, for each fit galaxy kcorrect can provide an estimate of the stellar mass-to-light ratio.

[ascl:1701.009] GrayStarServer: Stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis

GrayStarServer is a stellar atmospheric modeling and spectrum synthesis code of pedagogical accuracy that is accessible in any web browser on commonplace computational devices and that runs on a timescale of a few seconds.

[ascl:1701.008] GrayStar: Web-based pedagogical stellar modeling

GrayStar is a web-based pedagogical stellar model. It approximates stellar atmospheric and spectral line modeling in JavaScript with visualization in HTML. It is suitable for a wide range of education and public outreach levels depending on which optional plots and print-outs are turned on. All plots and renderings are pure basic HTML and the plotting module contains original HTML procedures for automatically scaling and graduating x- and y-axes.

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