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Results 201-250 of 1840 (1813 ASCL, 27 submitted)

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[ascl:1802.011] runDM: Running couplings of Dark Matter to the Standard Model

runDM calculates the running of the couplings of Dark Matter (DM) to the Standard Model (SM) in simplified models with vector mediators. By specifying the mass of the mediator and the couplings of the mediator to SM fields at high energy, the code can calculate the couplings at low energy, taking into account the mixing of all dimension-6 operators. runDM can also extract the operator coefficients relevant for direct detection, namely low energy couplings to up, down and strange quarks and to protons and neutrons.

[ascl:1802.010] Glimpse: Sparsity based weak lensing mass-mapping tool

Glimpse, also known as Glimpse2D, is a weak lensing mass-mapping tool that relies on a robust sparsity-based regularization scheme to recover high resolution convergence from either gravitational shear alone or from a combination of shear and flexion. Including flexion allows the supplementation of the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map. To preserve all available small scale information, Glimpse avoids any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treats the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularized using a multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators.

[ascl:1802.009] astroplan: Observation planning package for astronomers

astroplan is a flexible toolbox for observation planning and scheduling. It is powered by Astropy (ascl:1304.002); it works for Python beginners and new observers, and is powerful enough for observatories preparing nightly and long-term schedules as well. It calculates rise/set/meridian transit times, alt/az positions for targets at observatories anywhere on Earth, and offers built-in plotting convenience functions for standard observation planning plots (airmass, parallactic angle, sky maps). It can also determine the observability of sets of targets given an arbitrary set of constraints (i.e., altitude, airmass, moon separation/illumination, etc.).

[ascl:1802.008] AntiparticleDM: Discriminating between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter

AntiparticleDM calculates the prospects of future direct detection experiments to discriminate between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter (i.e., to determine whether Dark Matter is its own antiparticle). Direct detection event rates and mock data generation are dealt with by a variation of the WIMpy code.

[ascl:1802.007] HiGal_SED_Fitter: SED fitting tools for Herschel Hi-Gal data

HiGal SED Fitter fits modified blackbody SEDs to Herschel data, specifically targeted at Herschel Hi-Gal data.

[submitted] muLAn (MICROlensing Analysis software): a public software to model gravitational microlensing events

muLAn is a Python modeling software developed to analyze and fit light curves of gravitational microlensing events. The software has been designed to be easy to use even for the newcomer in microlensing, thanks to external, synthetic and self-explanatory setup files containing all important commands and option settings. The user may choose to launch the code through command line instructions, or to import muLAn within another Python project like any standard Python package. It also comes with many useful routines (export publication-quality figures, data formatting and cleaning) and state-of-the-art statistical tools. The result of the modeling can be interpreted using an interactive html page which contains all information about the light curve model, caustics, source trajectory, best-fit parameters and chi-square. Parameters uncertainties and statistical properties (such as multi-modal features of the posterior density) can be assessed from correlation plots. The code includes all classical microlensing models (single and binary microlenses, ground- and space-based parallax effects, orbital motion, finite-source effects, limb-darkening, etc.) which can be combined into several time intervals of the analyzed light curve. Minimization methods include an Affine-Invariant Ensemble Sampler to generate a multivariate proposal function while running several Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, for the set of parameters which is chosen to be fit; non-fitting parameters can be either kept fixed or set on a grid defined by the user. Furthermore, the software offers a model-free option to align all data sets together and allows to inspect the light curve before any modeling work. The code is modular: users can add their own model's computation or minimization routines by directly adding their Python files without modifying the main code. This flexibility aims to offer a valuable framework to develop automated open-source microlensing modeling codes.

[ascl:1802.006] VISIBLE: VISIbility Based Line Extraction

VISIBLE applies approximated matched filters to interferometric data, allowing line detection directly in visibility space. The filter can be created from a FITS image or RADMC3D output image, and the weak line data can be a CASA MS or uvfits file. The filter response spectrum can be output either to a .npy file or returned back to the user for scripting.

[ascl:1802.005] Verne: Earth-stopping effect for heavy dark matter

Verne calculates the Earth-stopping effect for super-heavy Dark Matter (DM). The code allows you to calculate the speed distribution (and DM signal rate) at an arbitrary detector location on the Earth. The calculation takes into account the full anisotropic DM velocity distribution and the full velocity dependence of the DM-nucleus cross section. Results can be obtained for any DM mass and cross section, though the results are most reliable for very heavy DM particles.

[submitted] Opik Collision Probability

The Opik method gives the mean probability of collision of a small body with a given planet. It is a statistical value valid for an orbit with given (a,e,i) and undefined argument of perihelion. In some cases, the planet can eject the small body from the solar system; in these cases, the program estimates the mean time for the ejection. The Opik method does not take into account other perturbers than the planet considered, so it only provides an idea of the timescales involved.

[ascl:1802.004] ARTIP: Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline

The Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline (ARTIP) automates the entire process of flagging, calibrating, and imaging for radio-interferometric data. ARTIP starts with raw data, i.e. a measurement set and goes through multiple stages, such as flux calibration, bandpass calibration, phase calibration, and imaging to generate continuum and spectral line images. Each stage can also be run independently. The pipeline provides continuous feedback to the user through various messages, charts and logs. It is written using standard python libraries and the CASA package. The pipeline can deal with datasets with multiple spectral windows and also multiple target sources which may have arbitrary combinations of flux/bandpass/phase calibrators.

[ascl:1802.003] CMacIonize: Monte Carlo photoionisation and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics

CMacIonize simulates the self-consistent evolution of HII regions surrounding young O and B stars, or other sources of ionizing radiation. The code combines a Monte Carlo photoionization algorithm that uses a complex mix of hydrogen, helium and several coolants in order to self-consistently solve for the ionization and temperature balance at any given time, with a standard first order hydrodynamics scheme. The code can be run as a post-processing tool to get the line emission from an existing simulation snapshot, but can also be used to run full radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Both the radiation transfer and the hydrodynamics are implemented in a general way that is independent of the grid structure that is used to discretize the system, allowing it to be run both as a standard fixed grid code and also as a moving-mesh code.

[ascl:1802.002] venice: Mask utility

venice reads a mask file (DS9 or fits type) and a catalogue of objects (ascii or fits type) to create a pixelized mask, find objects inside/outside a mask, or generate a random catalogue of objects inside/outside a mask. The program reads the mask file and checks if a point, giving its coordinates, is inside or outside the mask, i.e. inside or outside at least one polygon of the mask.

[ascl:1802.001] FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

[ascl:1801.012] RadVel: General toolkit for modeling Radial Velocities

RadVel models Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) time series. The code is written in Python with a fast Kepler's equation solver written in C. It provides a framework for fitting RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and computing robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel can perform Bayesian model comparison and produces publication quality plots and LaTeX tables.

[ascl:1801.011] GABE: Grid And Bubble Evolver

GABE (Grid And Bubble Evolver) evolves scalar fields (as well as other purposes) on an expanding background for non-canonical and non-linear classical field theory. GABE is based on the Runge-Kutta method.

[ascl:1801.010] DICE/ColDICE: 6D collisionless phase space hydrodynamics using a lagrangian tesselation

DICE is a C++ template library designed to solve collisionless fluid dynamics in 6D phase space using massively parallel supercomputers via an hybrid OpenMP/MPI parallelization. ColDICE, based on DICE, implements a cosmological and physical VLASOV-POISSON solver for cold systems such as dark matter (CDM) dynamics.

[ascl:1801.009] Gnuastro: GNU Astronomy Utilities

Gnuastro (GNU Astronomy Utilities) manipulates and analyzes astronomical data. It is an official GNU package of a large collection of programs and C/C++ library functions. Command-line programs perform arithmetic operations on images, convert FITS images to common types like JPG or PDF, convolve an image with a given kernel or matching of kernels, perform cosmological calculations, crop parts of large images (possibly in multiple files), manipulate FITS extensions and keywords, and perform statistical operations. In addition, it contains programs to make catalogs from detection maps, add noise, make mock profiles with a variety of radial functions using monte-carlo integration for their centers, match catalogs, and detect objects in an image among many other operations. The command-line programs share the same basic command-line user interface for the comfort of both the users and developers. Gnuastro is written to comply fully with the GNU coding standards and integrates well with all Unix-like operating systems. This enables astronomers to expect a fully familiar experience in the source code, building, installing and command-line user interaction that they have seen in all the other GNU software that they use. Gnuastro's extensive library is included for users who want to build their own unique programs.

[ascl:1801.008] BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations

BOND determines oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions by comparison with a large grid of photoionization models. The grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Unlike other statistical methods, BOND relies on the [Ar III]/[Ne III] emission line ratio to break the oxygen abundance bimodality. By doing so, it can measure oxygen and nitrogen abundances without assuming any a priori relation between N/O and O/H. BOND takes into account changes in the hardness of the ionizing radiation field, which can come about due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastically sampling of the IMF. The emission line ratio He I/Hβ, in addition to commonly used strong lines, constrains the hardness of the ionizing radiation field. BOND relies on the emission line ratios [O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ and [N II]/Hβ, [Ar III]/Hβ, [Ne III]/Hβ, He I/Hβ as its input parameters, while its output values are the measurements and uncertainties for O/H and N/O.

[ascl:1801.007] cambmag: Magnetic Fields in CAMB

cambmag is a modification to CAMB (ascl:1102.026) that calculates the compensated magnetic mode in the scalar, vector and tensor case. Previously CAMB included code only for the vectors. It also corrects for tight-coupling issues and adds in the ability to include massive neutrinos when calculating vector modes.

[ascl:1801.006] DecouplingModes: Passive modes amplitudes

DecouplingModes calculates the amplitude of the passive modes, which requires solving the Einstein equations on superhorizon scales sourced by the anisotropic stress from the magnetic fields (prior to neutrino decoupling), and the magnetic and neutrino stress (after decoupling). The code is available as a Mathematica notebook.

[ascl:1801.005] InitialConditions: Initial series solutions for perturbations in our Universe

InitialConditions finds the initial series solutions for perturbations in our Universe. This includes all scalar (1 adiabatic, 4 isocurvature and 2 magnetic modes), vector (1 vorticity mode, 1 magnetic mode), and tensor (1 gravitational wave mode and 1 magnetic mode) perturbations including terms up to second order in the neutrino mass. It can handle the standard species (cdm, baryons, photons), and two neutrino mass eigenstates (1 light, 1 heavy).

[ascl:1801.004] hh0: Hierarchical Hubble Constant Inference

hh0 is a Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM) that describes the full distance ladder, from nearby geometric-distance anchors through Cepheids to SNe in the Hubble flow. It does not rely on any of the underlying distributions being Gaussian, allowing outliers to be modeled and obviating the need for any arbitrary data cuts.

[ascl:1801.003] Stan: Statistical inference

Stan facilitates statistical inference at the frontiers of applied statistics and provides both a modeling language for specifying complex statistical models and a library of statistical algorithms for computing inferences with those models. These components are exposed through interfaces in environments such as R, Python, and the command line.

[ascl:1801.002] iWander: Dynamics of interstellar wanderers

iWander assesses the origin of interstellar small bodies such as asteroids and comets. It includes a series of databases and tools that can be used in general for studying the dynamics of an interstellar vagabond object (small−body, interstellar spaceship and even stars).

[ascl:1801.001] BANYAN_Sigma: Bayesian classifier for members of young stellar associations

BANYAN_Sigma calculates the membership probability that a given astrophysical object belongs to one of the currently known 27 young associations within 150 pc of the Sun, using Bayesian inference. This tool uses the sky position and proper motion measurements of an object, with optional radial velocity (RV) and distance (D) measurements, to derive a Bayesian membership probability. By default, the priors are adjusted such that a probability threshold of 90% will recover 50%, 68%, 82% or 90% of true association members depending on what observables are input (only sky position and proper motion, with RV, with D, with both RV and D, respectively). The algorithm is implemented in a Python package, in IDL, and is also implemented as an interactive web page.

[submitted] A Neural Network for the Identification of Dangerous Planetesimals (Including scripts for data generation)

Two neural networks were designed to identify hazardous planetesimals that were trained on object trajectories calculated in a cloud computing environment. The first neural network was fully-connected and was trained on the orbital elements (OEs) of real/simulated planetesimals, while the second was a 1-dimensional convolutional neural network that was trained on the position Cartesian coordinates of real/simulated planetesimals. Ultimately, the network trained on OEs had a better performance by identifying one-third of known potentially hazardous objects including the 3 asteroids with the highest chance of impact with Earth (2009 FD, 1999 RQ36, 1950 DA) as established by NASA's Monte Carlo based Sentry system.

[submitted] loci: Smooth Cubic Multivariate Local Interpolations

loci is a shared library for interpolations in up to 4 dimensions. It is written in C and can be used with C/C++, Python and others. In order to calculate the coefficients of the cubic polynom, only local values are used: The data itself and all combinations of first-order derivatives, i.e. in 2D f_x, f_y and f_xy. This is in contrast to splines, where the coefficients are not calculated using derivatives, but non-local data, which can lead to over-smoothing the result.

[ascl:1712.016] LgrbWorldModel: Long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

LgrbWorldModel is written in Fortran 90 and attempts to model the population distribution of the Long-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of LGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution. The best-fit parameters of the distribution are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC) Sampler.

[ascl:1712.015] SgrbWorldModel: Short-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

SgrbWorldModel, written in Fortran 90, presents an attempt at modeling the population distribution of the Short-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of SGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution, whose differential cosmological rate of occurrence follows the Star-Formation-Rate (SFR) convolved with a log-normal binary-merger delay-time distribution. The best-fit parameters of the model are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by the BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC)Sampler that is part of the code. A model for the detection algorithm of the BATSE detectors is also provided.

[ascl:1712.014] QATS: Quasiperiodic Automated Transit Search

QATS detects transiting extrasolar planets in time-series photometry. It relaxes the usual assumption of strictly periodic transits by permitting a variable, but bounded, interval between successive transits.

[ascl:1712.013] photodynam: Photodynamical code for fitting the light curves of multiple body systems

Photodynam facilitates so-called "photometric-dynamical" modeling. This model is quite simple and this is reflected in the code base. A N-body code provides coordinates and the photometric code produces light curves based on coordinates.

[ascl:1712.012] MadDM: Computation of dark matter relic abundance

MadDM computes dark matter relic abundance and dark matter nucleus scattering rates in a generic model. The code is based on the existing MadGraph 5 architecture and as such is easily integrable into any MadGraph collider study. A simple Python interface offers a level of user-friendliness characteristic of MadGraph 5 without sacrificing functionality. MadDM is able to calculate the dark matter relic abundance in models which include a multi-component dark sector, resonance annihilation channels and co-annihilations. The direct detection module of MadDM calculates spin independent / spin dependent dark matter-nucleon cross sections and differential recoil rates as a function of recoil energy, angle and time. The code provides a simplified simulation of detector effects for a wide range of target materials and volumes.

[ascl:1712.011] FBEYE: Analyzing Kepler light curves and validating flares

FBEYE, the "Flares By-Eye" detection suite, is written in IDL and analyzes Kepler light curves and validates flares. It works on any 3-column light curve that contains time, flux, and error. The success of flare identification is highly dependent on the smoothing routine, which may not be suitable for all sources.

[ascl:1712.010] Flux Tube: Solar model

Flux Tube is a nonlinear, two-dimensional, numerical simulation of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations are applied to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized by a special boundary condition.

[ascl:1712.009] RODRIGUES: RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software

RODRIGUES (RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software) is a web-based radio telescope simulation and reduction tool. From a technical perspective it is a web based parameterized docker container scheduler with a result set viewer.

[ascl:1712.008] CosApps: Simulate gravitational lensing through ray tracing and shear calculation

Cosmology Applications (CosApps) provides tools to simulate gravitational lensing using two different techniques, ray tracing and shear calculation. The tool ray_trace_ellipse calculates deflection angles on a grid for light passing a deflecting mass distribution. Using MPI, ray_trace_ellipse may calculate deflection in parallel across network connected computers, such as cluster. The program physcalc calculates the gravitational lensing shear using the relationship of convergence and shear, described by a set of coupled partial differential equations.

[ascl:1712.007] SFoF: Friends-of-friends galaxy cluster detection algorithm

SFoF is a friends-of-friends galaxy cluster detection algorithm that operates in either spectroscopic or photometric redshift space. The linking parameters, both transverse and along the line-of-sight, change as a function of redshift to account for selection effects.

[ascl:1712.006] Nyx: Adaptive mesh, massively-parallel, cosmological simulation code

Nyx code solves equations of compressible hydrodynamics on an adaptive grid hierarchy coupled with an N-body treatment of dark matter. The gas dynamics in Nyx use a finite volume methodology on an adaptive set of 3-D Eulerian grids; dark matter is represented as discrete particles moving under the influence of gravity. Particles are evolved via a particle-mesh method, using Cloud-in-Cell deposition/interpolation scheme. Both baryonic and dark matter contribute to the gravitational field. In addition, Nyx includes physics for accurately modeling the intergalactic medium; in optically thin limits and assuming ionization equilibrium, the code calculates heating and cooling processes of the primordial-composition gas in an ionizing ultraviolet background radiation field.

[ascl:1712.005] draco: Analysis and simulation of drift scan radio data

draco analyzes transit radio data with the m-mode formalism. It is telescope agnostic, and is used as part of the analysis and simulation pipeline for the CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) telescope. It can simulate time stream data from maps of the sky (using the m-mode formalism) and add gain fluctuations and correctly correlated instrumental noise (i.e. Wishart distributed). Further, it can perform various cuts on the data and make maps of the sky from data using the m-mode formalism.

[ascl:1712.004] Bitshuffle: Filter for improving compression of typed binary data

Bitshuffle rearranges typed, binary data for improving compression; the algorithm is implemented in a python/C package within the Numpy framework. The library can be used alongside HDF5 to compress and decompress datasets and is integrated through the dynamically loaded filters framework. Algorithmically, Bitshuffle is closely related to HDF5's Shuffle filter except it operates at the bit level instead of the byte level. Arranging a typed data array in to a matrix with the elements as the rows and the bits within the elements as the columns, Bitshuffle "transposes" the matrix, such that all the least-significant-bits are in a row, etc. This transposition is performed within blocks of data roughly 8kB long; this does not in itself compress data, but rearranges it for more efficient compression. A compression library is necessary to perform the actual compression. This scheme has been used for compression of radio data in high performance computing.

[ascl:1712.003] Py-SPHViewer: Cosmological simulations using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

Py-SPHViewer visualizes and explores N-body + Hydrodynamics simulations. The code interpolates the underlying density field (or any other property) traced by a set of particles, using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) interpolation scheme, thus producing not only beautiful but also useful scientific images. Py-SPHViewer enables the user to explore simulated volumes using different projections. Py-SPHViewer also provides a natural way to visualize (in a self-consistent fashion) gas dynamical simulations, which use the same technique to compute the interactions between particles.

[ascl:1712.002] MPI_XSTAR: MPI-based parallelization of XSTAR program

MPI_XSTAR parallelizes execution of multiple XSTAR runs using Message Passing Interface (MPI). XSTAR (ascl:9910.008), part of the HEASARC's HEAsoft (ascl:1408.004) package, calculates the physical conditions and emission spectra of ionized gases. MPI_XSTAR invokes XSTINITABLE from HEASoft to generate a job list of XSTAR commands for given physical parameters. The job list is used to make directories in ascending order, where each individual XSTAR is spawned on each processor and outputs are saved. HEASoft's XSTAR2TABLE program is invoked upon the contents of each directory in order to produce table model FITS files for spectroscopy analysis tools.

[ascl:1712.001] KDUtils: Kinematic Distance Utilities

The Kinematic Distance utilities (KDUtils) calculate kinematic distances and kinematic distance uncertainties. The package includes methods to calculate "traditional" kinematic distances as well as a Monte Carlo method to calculate kinematic distances and uncertainties.

[ascl:1711.024] NOD3: Single dish reduction software

NOD3 processes and analyzes maps from single-dish observations affected by scanning effects from clouds, receiver instabilities, or radio-frequency interference. Its “basket-weaving” tool combines orthogonally scanned maps into a final map that is almost free of scanning effects. A restoration tool for dual-beam observations reduces the noise by a factor of about two compared to the NOD2 version. Combining single-dish with interferometer data in the map plane ensures the full recovery of the total flux density.

[ascl:1711.023] HBT+: Subhalo finder and merger tree builder

HBT+ is a hybrid subhalo finder and merger tree builder for cosmological simulations. It comes as an MPI edition that can be run on distributed clusters or shared memory machines and is MPI/OpenMP parallelized, and also as an OpenMP edition that can be run on shared memory machines and is only OpenMP parallelized. This version is more memory efficient than the MPI branch on shared memory machines, and is more suitable for analyzing zoomed-in simulations that are difficult to balance on distributed clusters. Both editions support hydro simulations with gas/stars.

[ascl:1711.022] HBT: Hierarchical Bound-Tracing

HBT is a Hierarchical Bound-Tracing subhalo finder and merger tree builder, for numerical simulations in cosmology. It tracks haloes from birth and continues to track them after mergers, finding self-bound structures as subhaloes and recording their merger histories as merger trees.

[ascl:1711.021] Bifrost: Stream processing framework for high-throughput applications

Bifrost is a stream processing framework that eases the development of high-throughput processing CPU/GPU pipelines. It is designed for digital signal processing (DSP) applications within radio astronomy. Bifrost uses a flexible ring buffer implementation that allows different signal processing blocks to be connected to form a pipeline. Each block may be assigned to a CPU core, and the ring buffers are used to transport data to and from blocks. Processing blocks may be run on either the CPU or GPU, and the ring buffer will take care of memory copies between the CPU and GPU spaces.

[ascl:1711.020] MARXS: Multi-Architecture Raytrace Xray mission Simulator

MARXS (Multi-Architecture-Raytrace-Xraymission-Simulator) simulates X-ray observatories. Primarily designed to simulate X-ray instruments on astronomical X-ray satellites and sounding rocket payloads, it can also be used to ray-trace experiments in the laboratory. MARXS performs polarization Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations from a source (astronomical or lab) through a collection of optical elements such as mirrors, baffles, and gratings to a detector.

[ascl:1711.019] SPIDERMAN: Fast code to simulate secondary transits and phase curves

SPIDERMAN calculates exoplanet phase curves and secondary eclipses with arbitrary surface brightness distributions in two dimensions. The code uses a geometrical algorithm to solve exactly the area of sections of the disc of the planet that are occulted by the star. Approximately 1000 models can be generated per second in typical use, which makes making Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses practicable. The code is modular and allows comparison of the effect of multiple different brightness distributions for a dataset.

[ascl:1711.018] LExTeS: Link Extraction and Testing Suite

LExTeS (Link Extraction and Testing Suite) extracts hyperlinks from PDF documents, tests the extracted links to see which are broken, and tabulates the results. Though written to support a particular set of PDF documents, the dataset and scripts can be edited for use on other documents.

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