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Results 451-500 of 1772 (1747 ASCL, 25 submitted)

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[ascl:1608.016] NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

[ascl:1608.015] 2DFFT: Measuring Galactic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

2DFFT utilizes two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms; this provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature and allows comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. 2DFFT requires fourn.c from Numerical Recipes in C (Press et al. 1989).

[ascl:1608.014] gevolution: General Relativity Cosmological N-body code for evolution of large scale structures

The N-body code gevolution complies with general relativity principles at every step; it calculates all six metric degrees of freedom in Poisson gauge. N-body particles are evolved by solving the geodesic equation written in terms of a canonical momentum to remain valid for relativistic particles. gevolution can be extended to include different kinds of dark energy or modified gravity models, going beyond the usually adopted quasi-static approximation. A weak field expansion is the central element of gevolution; this permits the code to treat settings in which no strong gravitational fields appear, including arbitrary scenarios with relativistic sources as long as gravitational fields are not very strong. The framework is well suited for cosmology, but may also be useful for astrophysical applications with moderate gravitational fields where a Newtonian treatment is insufficient.

[ascl:1608.013] DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

[submitted] ExoPlanet

ExoPlanet provides a graphical interface for the construction, evaluation and application of a machine learning model in predictive analysis. With the back-end built using the numpy and scikit-learn libraries, ExoPlanet couples fast and well tested algorithms, a UI designed over the PyQt framework, and graphs rendered using Matplotlib. This serves to provide the user with a rich interface, rapid analytics and interactive visuals.

ExoPlanet is designed to have a minimal learning curve to allow researchers to focus more on the applicative aspect of machine learning algorithms rather than their implementation details and supports both methods of learning, providing algorithms for unsupervised and supervised training, which may be done with continuous or discrete labels. The parameters of each algorithms can be adjusted to ensure the best fit for the data. Training data is read from a CSV file, and after training is complete, ExoPlanet automates the building of the visual representations for the trained model. Once training and evaluation yield satisfactory results, the model may be used to make data based predictions on a new data set.

[ascl:1608.012] OBERON: OBliquity and Energy balance Run on N-body systems

OBERON (OBliquity and Energy balance Run on N-body systems) models the climate of Earthlike planets under the effects of an arbitrary number and arrangement of other bodies, such as stars, planets and moons. The code, written in C++, simultaneously computes N body motions using a 4th order Hermite integrator, simulates climates using a 1D latitudinal energy balance model, and evolves the orbital spin of bodies using the equations of Laskar (1986a,b).

[ascl:1608.011] PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

[ascl:1608.010] pvextractor: Position-Velocity Diagram Extractor

Given a path defined in sky coordinates and a spectral cube, pvextractor extracts a slice of the cube along that path and along the spectral axis to produce a position-velocity or position-frequency slice. The path can be defined programmatically in pixel or world coordinates, and can also be drawn interactively using a simple GUI. Pvextractor is the main function, but also includes a few utilities related to header trimming and parsing.

[ascl:1608.009] FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

[ascl:1608.008] Cuba: Multidimensional numerical integration library

The Cuba library offers four independent routines for multidimensional numerical integration: Vegas, Suave, Divonne, and Cuhre. The four algorithms work by very different methods, and can integrate vector integrands and have very similar Fortran, C/C++, and Mathematica interfaces. Their invocation is very similar, making it easy to cross-check by substituting one method by another. For further safeguarding, the output is supplemented by a chi-square probability which quantifies the reliability of the error estimate.

[ascl:1608.007] BASE-9: Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with nine variables

The BASE-9 (Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with nine variables) software suite recovers star cluster and stellar parameters from photometry and is useful for analyzing single-age, single-metallicity star clusters, binaries, or single stars, and for simulating such systems. BASE-9 uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique along with brute force numerical integration to estimate the posterior probability distribution for the age, metallicity, helium abundance, distance modulus, line-of-sight absorption, and parameters of the initial-final mass relation (IFMR) for a cluster, and for the primary mass, secondary mass (if a binary), and cluster probability for every potential cluster member. The MCMC technique is used for the cluster quantities (the first six items listed above) and numerical integration is used for the stellar quantities (the last three items in the above list).

[ascl:1608.006] Gemini IRAF: Data reduction software for the Gemini telescopes

The Gemini IRAF package processes observational data obtained with the Gemini telescopes. It is an external package layered upon IRAF and supports data from numerous instruments, including FLAMINGOS-2, GMOS-N, GMOS-S, GNIRS, GSAOI, NIFS, and NIRI. The Gemini IRAF package is organized into sub-packages; it contains a generic tools package, "gemtools", along with instrument-specific packages. The raw data from the Gemini facility instruments are stored as Multi-Extension FITS (MEF) files. Therefore, all the tasks in the Gemini IRAF package, intended for processing data from the Gemini facility instruments, are capable of handling MEF files.

[ascl:1608.005] AstroVis: Visualizing astronomical data cubes

AstroVis enables rapid visualization of large data files on platforms supporting the OpenGL rendering library. Radio astronomical observations are typically three dimensional and stored as data cubes. AstroVis implements a scalable approach to accessing these files using three components: a File Access Component (FAC) that reduces the impact of reading time, which speeds up access to the data; the Image Processing Component (IPC), which breaks up the data cube into smaller pieces that can be processed locally and gives a representation of the whole file; and Data Visualization, which implements an approach of Overview + Detail to reduces the dimensions of the data being worked with and the amount of memory required to store it. The result is a 3D display paired with a 2D detail display that contains a small subsection of the original file in full resolution without reducing the data in any way.

[ascl:1608.004] BART: Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer fitting code

BART implements a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer scheme for extracting parameters from spectra of planetary atmospheres. BART combines a thermochemical-equilibrium code, a one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer code, and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module to constrain the atmospheric temperature and chemical-abundance profiles of exoplanets.

[ascl:1608.003] appaloosa: Python-based flare finding code for Kepler light curves

The appaloosa suite automates flare-finding in every Kepler light curves. It builds quiescent light curve models that include long- and short-cadence data through iterative de-trending and includes completeness estimates via artificial flare injection and recovery tests.

[ascl:1608.002] pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

[ascl:1608.001] Stingray: Spectral-timing software

Stingray is a spectral-timing software package for astrophysical X-ray (and more) data. The package merges existing efforts for a (spectral-)timing package in Python and is composed of a library of time series methods (including power spectra, cross spectra, covariance spectra, and lags); scripts to load FITS data files from different missions; a simulator of light curves and event lists that includes different kinds of variability and more complicated phenomena based on the impulse response of given physical events (e.g. reverberation); and a GUI to ease the learning curve for new users.

[ascl:1607.020] SEEK: Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer

SEEK (Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer) processes time-ordered-data from single dish radio telescopes or from the simulation pipline HIDE (ascl:1607.019), removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and recovers the astronomical radio signal. With its companion code HIDE (ascl:1607.019), it provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.

[ascl:1607.019] HIDE: HI Data Emulator

HIDE (HI Data Emulator) forward-models the process of collecting astronomical radio signals in a single dish radio telescope instrument and outputs pixel-level time-ordered-data. Written in Python, HIDE models the noise and RFI modeling of the data and with its companion code SEEK (ascl:1607.020) provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.

[ascl:1607.018] LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

[ascl:1607.017] BoxRemap: Volume and local structure preserving mapping of periodic boxes

BoxRemap remaps the cubical domain of a cosmological simulation into simple non-cubical shapes. It can be used for on-the-fly remappings of the simulation geometry and is volume-preserving; remapped geometry has the same volume V = L3 as the original simulation box. The remappings are structure-preserving (local neighboring structures are mapped to neighboring places) and one-to-one, with every particle/halo/galaxy/etc. appearing once and only once in the remapped volume.

[ascl:1607.016] astLib: Tools for research astronomers

astLib is a set of Python modules for performing astronomical plots, some statistics, common calculations, coordinate conversions, and manipulating FITS images with World Coordinate System (WCS) information through PyWCSTools, a simple wrapping of WCSTools (ascl:1109.015).

[ascl:1607.015] RT1D: 1D code for Rayleigh-Taylor instability

The parallel one-dimensional moving-mesh hydrodynamics code RT1D reproduces the multidimensional dynamics from Rayleigh-Taylor instability in supernova remnants.

[ascl:1607.014] SOPIE: Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation

SOPIE (Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation) provides functions to non-parametrically estimate the off-pulse interval of a source function originating from a pulsar. The technique is based on a sequential application of P-values obtained from goodness-of-fit tests for the uniform distribution, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramér-von Mises, Anderson-Darling and Rayleigh goodness-of-fit tests.

[ascl:1607.013] Kālī: Time series data modeler

The fully parallelized and vectorized software package Kālī models time series data using various stochastic processes such as continuous-time ARMA (C-ARMA) processes and uses Bayesian Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) for inferencing a stochastic light curve. Kālī is written in c++ with Python language bindings for ease of use. Kālī is named jointly after the Hindu goddess of time, change, and power and also as an acronym for KArma LIbrary.

[ascl:1607.012] ZASPE: Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator

ZASPE (Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator) computes the atmospheric stellar parameters (Teff, log(g), [Fe/H] and vsin(i)) from echelle spectra via least squares minimization with a pre-computed library of synthetic spectra. The minimization is performed only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. The uncertainities and covariances computed by ZASPE assume that the principal source of error is the systematic missmatch between the observed spectrum and the sythetic one that produces the best fit. ZASPE requires a grid of synthetic spectra and can use any pre-computed library minor modifications.

[ascl:1607.011] HfS: Hyperfine Structure fitting tool

HfS fits the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH3 (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive the NH3 column density, rotational temperature Trot, and kinetic temperature Tk. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters, with special attention to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

[ascl:1607.009] PICsar: Particle in cell pulsar magnetosphere simulator

PICsar simulates the magnetosphere of an aligned axisymmetric pulsar and can be used to simulate other arbitrary electromagnetics problems in axisymmetry. Written in Fortran, this special relativistic, electromagnetic, charge conservative particle in cell code features stretchable body-fitted coordinates that follow the surface of a sphere, simplifying the application of boundary conditions in the case of the aligned pulsar; a radiation absorbing outer boundary, which allows a steady state to be set up dynamically and maintained indefinitely from transient initial conditions; and algorithms for injection of charged particles into the simulation domain. PICsar is parallelized using MPI and has been used on research problems with ~1000 CPUs.

[ascl:1607.010] K2PS: K2 Planet search

K2PS is an Oxford K2 planet search pipeline. Written in Python, it searches for transit-like signals from the k2sc-detrended light curves.

[ascl:1607.008] BLS: Box-fitting Least Squares

BLS (Box-fitting Least Squares) is a box-fitting algorithm that analyzes stellar photometric time series to search for periodic transits of extrasolar planets. It searches for signals characterized by a periodic alternation between two discrete levels, with much less time spent at the lower level.

[ascl:1607.007] JUDE: An Utraviolet Imaging Telescope pipeline

JUDE (Jayant's UVIT Data Explorer) converts the Level 1 data (FITS binary table) from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) on ASTROSAT into three output files: a photon event list as a function of frame number (FITS binary table); a FITS image file with two extensions; and a PNG file created from the FITS image file with an automated scaling.

[ascl:1607.006] Cholla: 3D GPU-based hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulation

Cholla (Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures) models the Euler equations on a static mesh and evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously using GPUs. It can update over ten million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction, allowing computation of astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (>256^3) on a single device; calculations can be extended onto multiple devices with nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs.

[ascl:1607.005] Planetary3br: Three massive body resonance calculator

Given two planets P1 and P2 with arbitrary orbits, planetary3br calculates all possible semimajor axes that a third planet P0 can have in order for the system to be in a three body resonance; these are identified by the combination k0*P0 + k1*P1 + k2*P2. P1 and P2 are assumed to be not in an exact two-body resonance. The program also calculates three "strengths" of the resonance, one for each planet, which are only indicators of the dynamical relevance of the resonance on each planet. Sample input data are available along with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1607.004] Atlas3bgeneral: Three-body resonance calculator

For a massless test particle and given a planetary system, atlas3bgeneral calculates all three body resonances in a given range of semimajor axes with all the planets taken by pairs. Planets are assumed in fixed circular and coplanar orbits and the test particle with arbitrary orbit. A sample input data file to calculate the three-body resonances is available for use with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1607.003] Atlas2bgeneral: Two-body resonance calculator

For a massless test particle and given a planetary system, Atlas2bgeneral calculates all resonances in a given range of semimajor axes with all the planets taken one by one. Planets are assumed in fixed circular and coplanar orbits and the test particle with arbitrary orbit. A sample input data file to calculate the two-body resonances is available for use with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1607.002] DICE: Disk Initial Conditions Environment

DICE models initial conditions of idealized galaxies to study their secular evolution or their more complex interactions such as mergers or compact groups using N-Body/hydro codes. The code can set up a large number of components modeling distinct parts of the galaxy, and creates 3D distributions of particles using a N-try MCMC algorithm which does not require a prior knowledge of the distribution function. The gravitational potential is then computed on a multi-level Cartesian mesh by solving the Poisson equation in the Fourier space. Finally, the dynamical equilibrium of each component is computed by integrating the Jeans equations for each particles. Several galaxies can be generated in a row and be placed on Keplerian orbits to model interactions. DICE writes the initial conditions in the Gadget1 or Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) format and is fully compatible with Ramses (ascl:1011.007).

[ascl:1607.001] AGNfitter: SED-fitting code for AGN and galaxies from a MCMC approach

AGNfitter is a fully Bayesian MCMC method to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxies from the sub-mm to the UV; it enables robust disentanglement of the physical processes responsible for the emission of sources. Written in Python, AGNfitter makes use of a large library of theoretical, empirical, and semi-empirical models to characterize both the nuclear and host galaxy emission simultaneously. The model consists of four physical emission components: an accretion disk, a torus of AGN heated dust, stellar populations, and cold dust in star forming regions. AGNfitter determines the posterior distributions of numerous parameters that govern the physics of AGN with a fully Bayesian treatment of errors and parameter degeneracies, allowing one to infer integrated luminosities, dust attenuation parameters, stellar masses, and star formation rates.

[ascl:1606.015] FLASK: Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit

FLASK (Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit) makes tomographic realizations on the sphere of an arbitrary number of correlated lognormal or Gaussian random fields; it can create joint simulations of clustering and lensing with sub-per-cent accuracy over relevant angular scales and redshift ranges. It is C++ code parallelized with OpenMP; FLASK generates fast full-sky simulations of cosmological large-scale structure observables such as multiple matter density tracers (galaxies, quasars, dark matter haloes), CMB temperature anisotropies and weak lensing convergence and shear fields. The mutiple fields can be generated tomographically in an arbitrary number of redshift slices and all their statistical properties (including cross-correlations) are determined by the angular power spectra supplied as input and the multivariate lognormal (or Gaussian) distribution assumed for the fields. Effects like redshift space distortions, doppler distortions, magnification biases, evolution and intrinsic aligments can be introduced in the simulations via the input power spectra which must be supplied by the user.

[ascl:1606.014] Lmfit: Non-Linear Least-Square Minimization and Curve-Fitting for Python

Lmfit provides a high-level interface to non-linear optimization and curve fitting problems for Python. Lmfit builds on and extends many of the optimization algorithm of scipy.optimize, especially the Levenberg-Marquardt method from optimize.leastsq. Its enhancements to optimization and data fitting problems include using Parameter objects instead of plain floats as variables, the ability to easily change fitting algorithms, and improved estimation of confidence intervals and curve-fitting with the Model class. Lmfit includes many pre-built models for common lineshapes.

[ascl:1606.013] Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

[ascl:1606.012] KMDWARFPARAM: Parameters estimator for K and M dwarf stars

KMDWARFPARAM estimates the physical parameters of a star with mass M < 0.8 M_sun given one or more observational constraints. The code runs a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo procedure to estimate the parameter values and their uncertainties.

[ascl:1606.011] FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

[ascl:1606.010] SimpLens: Interactive gravitational lensing simulator

SimpLens illustrates some of the theoretical ideas important in gravitational lensing in an interactive way. After setting parameters for elliptical mass distribution and external mass, SimpLens displays the mass profile and source position, the lens potential and image locations, and indicate the image magnifications and contours of virtual light-travel time. A lens profile can be made shallower or steeper with little change in the image positions and with only total magnification affected.

[ascl:1606.009] Companion-Finder: Planets and binary companions in time series spectra

Companion-Finder looks for planets and binary companions in time series spectra by searching for the spectral lines of stellar companions to other stars observed with high-precision radial-velocity surveys.

[ascl:1606.008] s2: Object oriented wrapper for functions on the sphere

The s2 package can represent any arbitrary function defined on the sphere. Both real space map and harmonic space spherical harmonic representations are supported. Basic sky representations have been extended to simulate full sky noise distributions and Gaussian cosmic microwave background realisations. Support for the representation and convolution of beams is also provided. The code requires HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001).

[ascl:1606.007] COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

[ascl:1606.006] uvmcmcfit: Parametric models to interferometric data fitter

Uvmcmcfit fits parametric models to interferometric data. It is ideally suited to extract the maximum amount of information from marginally resolved observations with interferometers like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). uvmcmcfit uses emcee (ascl:1303.002) to do Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and can measure the goodness of fit from visibilities rather than deconvolved images, an advantage when there is strong gravitational lensing and in other situations. uvmcmcfit includes a pure-Python adaptation of Miriad’s (ascl:1106.007) uvmodel task to generate simulated visibilities given observed visibilities and a model image and a simple ray-tracing routine that allows it to account for both strongly lensed systems (where multiple images of the lensed galaxy are detected) and weakly lensed systems (where only a single image of the lensed galaxy is detected).

[ascl:1606.005] PyMultiNest: Python interface for MultiNest

PyMultiNest provides programmatic access to MultiNest (ascl:1109.006) and PyCuba, integration existing Python code (numpy, scipy), and enables writing Prior & LogLikelihood functions in Python. PyMultiNest can plot and visualize MultiNest's progress and allows easy plotting, visualization and summarization of MultiNest results. The plotting can be run on existing MultiNest output, and when not using PyMultiNest for running MultiNest.

[ascl:1606.004] HIBAYES: Global 21-cm Bayesian Monte-Carlo Model Fitting

HIBAYES implements fully-Bayesian extraction of the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization in the presence of foreground emission. User-defined likelihood and prior functions are called by the sampler PyMultiNest (ascl:1606.005) in order to jointly explore the full (signal plus foreground) posterior probability distribution and evaluate the Bayesian evidence for a given model. Implemented models, for simulation and fitting, include gaussians (HI signal) and polynomials (foregrounds). Some simple plotting and analysis tools are supplied. The code can be extended to other models (physical or empirical), to incorporate data from other experiments, or to use alternative Monte-Carlo sampling engines as required.

[ascl:1606.003] Cygrid: Cython-powered convolution-based gridding module for Python

The Python module Cygrid grids (resamples) data to any collection of spherical target coordinates, although its typical application involves FITS maps or data cubes. The module supports the FITS world coordinate system (WCS) standard; its underlying algorithm is based on the convolution of the original samples with a 2D Gaussian kernel. A lookup table scheme allows parallelization of the code and is combined with the HEALPix tessellation of the sphere for fast neighbor searches. Cygrid's runtime scales between O(n) and O(nlog n), with n being the number of input samples.

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