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[ascl:1606.005] PyMultiNest: Python interface for MultiNest

PyMultiNest provides programmatic access to MultiNest (ascl:1109.006) and PyCuba, integration existing Python code (numpy, scipy), and enables writing Prior & LogLikelihood functions in Python. PyMultiNest can plot and visualize MultiNest's progress and allows easy plotting, visualization and summarization of MultiNest results. The plotting can be run on existing MultiNest output, and when not using PyMultiNest for running MultiNest.

[ascl:1310.002] PyMSES: Python modules for RAMSES

PyMSES provides a python solution for getting data out of RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) astrophysical fluid dynamics simulations. It permits transparent manipulation of large simulations and interfaces with common Python libraries and existing code, and can serve as a post-processing toolbox for data analysis. It also does three-dimensional volume rendering with a specific algorithm optimized to work on RAMSES distributed data (Guillet et al. 2011 and Jones et a. 2011).

[ascl:1906.009] PyMORESANE: Python MOdel REconstruction by Synthesis-ANalysis Estimators

PyMORESANE is a Python and pyCUDA-accelerated implementation of the MORESANE deconvolution algorithm, a sparse deconvolution algorithm for radio interferometric imaging. It can restore diffuse astronomical sources which are faint in brightness, complex in morphology and possibly buried in the dirty beam’s side lobes of bright radio sources in the field.

[ascl:1109.010] PyModelFit: Model-fitting Framework and GUI Tool

PyModelFit provides a pythonic, object-oriented framework that simplifies the task of designing numerical models to fit data. This is a very broad task, and hence the current functionality of PyModelFit focuses on the simpler tasks of 1D curve-fitting, including a GUI interface to simplify interactive work (using Enthought Traits). For more complicated modeling, PyModelFit also provides a wide range of classes and a framework to support more general model/data types (2D to Scalar, 3D to Scalar, 3D to 3D, and so on).

[ascl:1707.005] PyMOC: Multi-Order Coverage map module for Python

PyMOC manipulates Multi-Order Coverage (MOC) maps. It supports reading and writing the three encodings mentioned in the IVOA MOC recommendation: FITS, JSON and ASCII.

[ascl:1808.008] PyMieDap: Python Mie Doubling Adding Program

PyMieDAP (Python Mie Doubling Adding Program) makes light scattering computations with Mie scattering and radiative transfer computations with full orders of scattering and taking into account the polarization of the light scattered. Full planet modeling at any phase angle is possible. With the included subpackage exopy, it is also possible to simulate systems with a star, a planet and a possible moon.

[ascl:1401.003] PyMidas: Interface from Python to Midas

PyMidas is an interface between Python and MIDAS, the major ESO legacy general purpose data processing system. PyMidas allows a user to exploit both the rich legacy of MIDAS software and the power of Python scripting in a unified interactive environment. PyMidas also allows the usage of other Python-based astronomical analysis systems such as PyRAF.

[ascl:1411.011] PyMGC3: Finding stellar streams in the Galactic Halo using a family of Great Circle Cell counts methods

PyMGC3 is a Python toolkit to apply the Modified Great Circle Cell Counts (mGC3) method to search for tidal streams in the Galactic Halo. The code computes pole count maps using the full mGC3/nGC3/GC3 family of methods. The original GC3 method (Johnston et al., 1996) uses positional information to search for 'great-circle-cell structures'; mGC3 makes use of full 6D data and nGC3 uses positional and proper motion data.

[ascl:1902.003] PyMF: Matched filtering techniques for astronomical images

PyMF performs spatial filtering (matched filter, matched multifilter, constrained matched filter and constrained matched mutifilter) image processing that provides optimal reduction of the contamination introduced by sources that can be approximated by templates. These techniques use the flat-sky approximation.

[ascl:1505.025] pyMCZ: Oxygen abundances calculations and uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

pyMCZ calculates metallicity according to a number of strong line metallicity diagnostics from spectroscopy line measurements and obtains uncertainties from the line flux errors in a Monte Carlo framework. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, pyMCZ produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 13 metallicity scales simultaneously, as well as for E(B-V), and estimates their median values and their 68% confidence regions. The code can output the full MC distributions and their kernel density estimates.

[ascl:1610.016] PyMC3: Python probabilistic programming framework

PyMC3 performs Bayesian statistical modeling and model fitting focused on advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo and variational fitting algorithms. It offers powerful sampling algorithms, such as the No U-Turn Sampler, allowing complex models with thousands of parameters with little specialized knowledge of fitting algorithms, intuitive model specification syntax, and optimization for finding the maximum a posteriori (MAP) point. PyMC3 uses Theano to compute gradients via automatic differentiation as well as compile probabilistic programs on-the-fly to C for increased speed.

[ascl:1506.005] PyMC: Bayesian Stochastic Modelling in Python

PyMC is a python module that implements Bayesian statistical models and fitting algorithms, including Markov chain Monte Carlo. Its flexibility and extensibility make it applicable to a large suite of problems. Along with core sampling functionality, PyMC includes methods for summarizing output, plotting, goodness-of-fit and convergence diagnostics.

[ascl:1906.022] pyLIMA: Microlensing modeling package

pyLIMA (python Lightcurve Identification and Microlensing Analysis) fits microlensing lightcurves and derives the physical quantities of lens systems. The package provides microlensing modeling, and the magnification estimation for high cadence lightcurves has been optimized. pyLIMA is designed to make microlensing modeling and event simulation widely available to the community.

[ascl:1612.018] pylightcurve: Exoplanet lightcurve model

pylightcurve is a model for light-curves of transiting planets. It uses the four coefficients law for the stellar limb darkening and returns the relative flux, F(t), as a function of the limb darkening coefficients, an, the Rp/R* ratio and all the orbital parameters based on the nonlinear limb darkening model (Claret 2000).

[ascl:1811.008] Pylians: Python libraries for the analysis of numerical simulations

Pylians facilitates the analysis of numerical simulations (both N-body and hydro). This set of libraries, written in python, cython and C, compute power spectra, bispectra, and correlation functions, identifies voids, and populates halos with galaxies using an HOD. Pylians can also apply HI+H2 corrections to the output of hydrodynamic simulations, makes 21cm maps, computes DLAs column density distribution functions, and plots density fields.

[ascl:1510.003] PyLDTk: Python toolkit for calculating stellar limb darkening profiles and model-specific coefficients for arbitrary filters

PyLDTk automates the calculation of custom stellar limb darkening (LD) profiles and model-specific limb darkening coefficients (LDC) using the library of PHOENIX-generated specific intensity spectra by Husser et al. (2013). It facilitates exoplanet transit light curve modeling, especially transmission spectroscopy where the modeling is carried out for custom narrow passbands. PyLDTk construct model-specific priors on the limb darkening coefficients prior to the transit light curve modeling. It can also be directly integrated into the log posterior computation of any pre-existing transit modeling code with minimal modifications to constrain the LD model parameter space directly by the LD profile, allowing for the marginalization over the whole parameter space that can explain the profile without the need to approximate this constraint by a prior distribution. This is useful when using a high-order limb darkening model where the coefficients are often correlated, and the priors estimated from the tabulated values usually fail to include these correlations.

[ascl:1708.016] pyLCSIM: X-ray lightcurves simulator

pyLCSIM simulates X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models. Coherent signals can be specified as a sum of one or more sinusoids, each with its frequency, pulsed fraction and phase shift; or as a series of harmonics of a fundamental frequency (each with its pulsed fraction and phase shift). Power spectra can be simulated from a model of the power spectrum density (PSD) using as a template one or more of the built-in library functions. The user can also define his/her custom models. Models are additive.

[ascl:1506.001] pyKLIP: PSF Subtraction for Exoplanets and Disks

pyKLIP subtracts out the stellar PSF to search for directly-imaged exoplanets and disks using a Python implementation of the Karhunen-Loève Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm. pyKLIP supports ADI, SDI, and ADI+SDI to model the stellar PSF and offers a large array of PSF subtraction parameters to optimize the reduction. pyKLIP relies on a minimal amount of dependencies (numpy, scipy, and astropy) and parallelizes the KLIP algorithm to speed up the reduction. pyKLIP supports GPI and P1640 data and can interface with other data sources with the addition of new modules. It also can inject simulated planets and disks as well as automatically search for point sources in PSF-subtracted data.

[ascl:1208.004] PyKE: Reduction and analysis of Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry data

PyKE is a python-based PyRAF package that can also be run as a stand-alone program within a unix-based shell without compiling against PyRAF. It is a group of tasks developed for the reduction and analysis of Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry (SAP) data of individual targets with individual characteristics. The main purposes of these tasks are to i) re-extract light curves from manually-chosen pixel apertures and ii) cotrend and/or detrend the data in order to reduce or remove systematic noise structure using methods tunable to user and target-specific requirements. PyKE is an open source project and contributions of new tasks or enhanced functionality of existing tasks by the community are welcome.

[ascl:1511.005] pyhrs: Spectroscopic data reduction package for SALT

The pyhrs package reduces data from the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). HRS is a dual-beam, fiber fed echelle spectrectrograph with four modes of operation: low (R~16000), medium (R~34000), high (R~65000), and high stability (R~65000). pyhrs, written in Python, includes all of the steps necessary to reduce HRS low, medium, and high resolution data; this includes basic CCD reductions, order identification, wavelength calibration, and extraction of the spectra.

[ascl:1907.004] pyGTC: Parameter covariance plots

pyGTC creates giant triangle confusogram (GTC) plots. Triangle plots display the results of a Monte-Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling or similar analysis. The recovered parameter constraints are displayed on a grid in which the diagonal shows the one-dimensional posteriors (and, optionally, priors) and the lower-left triangle shows the pairwise projections. Such plots are useful for seeing the parameter covariances along with the priors when fitting a model to data.

[ascl:1603.013] PyGSM: Python interface to the Global Sky Model

PyGSM is a Python interface for the Global Sky Model (GSM, ascl:1011.010). The GSM is a model of diffuse galactic radio emission, constructed from a variety of all-sky surveys spanning the radio band (e.g. Haslam and WMAP). PyGSM uses the GSM to generate all-sky maps in Healpix format of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 94 GHz. The PyGSM module provides visualization utilities, file output in FITS format, and the ability to generate observed skies for a given location and date. PyGSM requires Healpy, PyEphem (ascl:1112.014), and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1611.013] pyGMMis: Mixtures-of-Gaussians density estimation method

pyGMMis is a mixtures-of-Gaussians density estimation method that accounts for arbitrary incompleteness in the process that creates the samples as long as the incompleteness is known over the entire feature space and does not depend on the sample density (missing at random). pyGMMis uses the Expectation-Maximization procedure and generates its best guess of the unobserved samples on the fly. It can also incorporate an uniform "background" distribution as well as independent multivariate normal measurement errors for each of the observed samples, and then recovers an estimate of the error-free distribution from which both observed and unobserved samples are drawn. The code automatically segments the data into localized neighborhoods, and is capable of performing density estimation with millions of samples and thousands of model components on machines with sufficient memory.

[ascl:1402.021] PyGFit: Python Galaxy Fitter

PyGFit measures PSF-matched photometry from images with disparate pixel scales and PSF sizes; its primary purpose is to extract robust spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from crowded images. It fits blended sources in crowded, low resolution images with models generated from a higher resolution image, thus minimizing the impact of crowding and also yielding consistently measured fluxes in different filters which minimizes systematic uncertainty in the final SEDs.

[ascl:1411.001] pyGadgetReader: GADGET snapshot reader for python

pyGadgetReader is a universal GADGET snapshot reader for python that supports type-1, type-2, HDF5, and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015) binary formats. It additionally supports reading binary outputs from FoF_Special, P-StarGroupFinder, Rockstar (ascl:1210.008), and Rockstar-Galaxies.

[ascl:1811.014] pygad: Analyzing Gadget Simulations with Python

pygad provides a framework for dealing with Gadget snapshots. The code reads any of the many different Gadget (ascl:0003.001) formats, allows easy masking snapshots to particles of interest, decorates the data blocks with units, allows to add automatically updating derived blocks, and provides several binning and plotting routines, among other tasks, to provide convenient, intuitive handling of the Gadget data without the need to worry about technical details. pygad provides access to single stellar population (SSP) models, has an interface to Rockstar (ascl:1210.008) output files, provides its own friends-of-friends (FoF) finder, calculates spherical overdensities, and has a sub-module to generate mock absorption lines.

[ascl:1103.012] Pyflation: Second Order Perturbations During Inflation Beyond Slow-roll

Pyflation calculates cosmological perturbations during an inflationary expansion of the universe. The modules in the pyflation Python package can be used to run simulations of different scalar field models of the early universe. The main classes are contained in the cosmomodels module and include simulations of background fields and first order and second order perturbations. The sourceterm package contains modules required for the computation of the term required for the evolution of second order perturbations.

Alongside the Python package, the bin directory contains Python scripts which can run first and second order simulations. A helper script called pyflation-qsubstart.py sets up a full second order run (including background, first order and source calculations) to be used on queueing system which contains the qsub executable (e.g. a Rocks cluster).

[ascl:1207.009] PyFITS: Python FITS Module

PyFITS provides an interface to FITS formatted files in the Python scripting language and PyRAF, the Python-based interface to IRAF. It is useful both for interactive data analysis and for writing analysis scripts in Python using FITS files as either input or output. PyFITS is a development project of the Science Software Branch at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

PyFITS has been deprecated. Please see Astropy.

[ascl:1403.002] pyExtinction: Atmospheric extinction

The Python script/package pyExtinction computes and plots total atmospheric extinction from decomposition into physical components (Rayleigh attenuation, ozone absorption, aerosol extinction). Its default extinction parameters are adapted to mean Mauna Kea summit conditions.

[ascl:1609.025] PYESSENCE: Generalized Coupled Quintessence Linear Perturbation Python Code

PYESSENCE evolves linearly perturbed coupled quintessence models with multiple (cold dark matter) CDM fluid species and multiple DE (dark energy) scalar fields, and can be used to generate quantities such as the growth factor of large scale structure for any coupled quintessence model with an arbitrary number of fields and fluids and arbitrary couplings.

[ascl:1112.014] PyEphem: Astronomical Ephemeris for Python

PyEphem provides scientific-grade astronomical computations for the Python programming language. Given a date and location on the Earth’s surface, it can compute the positions of the Sun and Moon, of the planets and their moons, and of any asteroids, comets, or earth satellites whose orbital elements the user can provide. Additional functions are provided to compute the angular separation between two objects in the sky, to determine the constellation in which an object lies, and to find the times at which an object rises, transits, and sets on a particular day.

The numerical routines that lie behind PyEphem are those from the wonderful XEphem astronomy application, whose author, Elwood Downey, generously gave permission for us to use them as the basis for PyEphem.

[ascl:1401.005] PyDrizzle: Python version of Drizzle

PyDrizzle provides a semi-automated interface for computing the parameters necessary for running Drizzle. PyDrizzle performs the task of determining the parameters necessary for aligning images based on the WCS information in the input image headers, as well as any supplemental alignment information provided in shift files, and combines the images onto the same WCS. Though it does not identify cosmic rays, it has the ability to ignore pixels flagged as bad, such as pixels identified by other programs as affected by cosmic rays.

[submitted] pydftools: Distribution function fitting in Python

pydftools is a pure-python port of the dftools R package (ascl:1805.002), which finds the most likely P parameters of a D-dimensional distribution function (DF) generating N objects, where each object is specified by D observables with measurement uncertainties. For instance, if the objects are galaxies, it can fit a MF (P=1), a mass-size distribution (P=2) or the mass-spin-morphology distribution (P=3). Unlike most common fitting approaches, this method accurately accounts for measurement in uncertainties and complex selection functions. Though this package imitates the dftools package quite closely while being as Pythonic as possible, it has not implemented 2D+ nor non-parametric.

[ascl:1509.010] PyCS : Python Curve Shifting

PyCS is a software toolbox to estimate time delays between multiple images of strongly lensed quasars, from resolved light curves such as obtained by the COSMOGRAIL monitoring program. The pycs package defines a collection of classes and high level functions, that you can script in a flexible way. PyCS makes it easy to compare different point estimators (including your own) without much code integration. The package heavily depends on numpy, scipy, and matplotlib.

[ascl:1810.008] pycraf: Spectrum-management compatibility

The pycraf Python package provides functions and procedures for spectrum-management compatibility studies, such as calculating the interference levels at a radio telescope produced from a radio broadcasting tower. It includes an implementation of ITU-R Recommendation P.452-16 for calculating path attenuation for the distance between an interferer and the victim service. It supports NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data for height-profile generation, includes a full implementation of ITU-R Rec. P.676-10, which provides two atmospheric models to calculate the attenuation for paths through Earth's atmosphere, and provides various antenna patterns necessary for compatibility studies (e.g., RAS, IMT, fixed-service links). The package can also convert power flux densities, field strengths, transmitted and received powers at certain distances and frequencies into each other.

[ascl:1210.027] PyCosmic: Detecting cosmics in CALIFA and other fiber-fed integral-field spectroscopy datasets

The detection of cosmic ray hits (cosmics) in fiber-fed integral-field spectroscopy (IFS) data of single exposures is a challenging task because of the complex signal recorded by IFS instruments. Existing detection algorithms are commonly found to be unreliable in the case of IFS data, and the optimal parameter settings are usually unknown a priori for a given dataset. The Calar Alto legacy integral field area (CALIFA) survey generates hundreds of IFS datasets for which a reliable and robust detection algorithm for cosmics is required as an important part of the fully automatic CALIFA data reduction pipeline. PyCosmic combines the edge-detection algorithm of L.A.Cosmic with a point-spread function convolution scheme. PyCosmic is the only algorithm that achieves an acceptable detection performance for CALIFA data. Only for strongly undersampled IFS data does L.A.Cosmic exceed the performance of PyCosmic by a few percent. Thus, PyCosmic appears to be the most versatile cosmics detection algorithm for IFS data.

[ascl:1311.002] PyCOOL: Cosmological Object-Oriented Lattice code

PyCOOL is a Python + CUDA program that solves the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. PyCOOL uses modern GPUs to solve this evolution and to make the computation much faster. The code includes numerous post-processing functions that provide useful information about the cosmological model, including various spectra and statistics of the fields.

[ascl:1509.007] pycola: N-body COLA method code

pycola is a multithreaded Python/Cython N-body code, implementing the Comoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method in the temporal and spatial domains, which trades accuracy at small-scales to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing. The COLA method achieves its speed by calculating the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos.

[ascl:1304.020] pyCloudy: Tools to manage astronomical Cloudy photoionization code

PyCloudy is a Python library that handles input and output files of the Cloudy photoionization code (Gary Ferland). It can also generate 3D nebula from various runs of the 1D Cloudy code. pyCloudy allows you to:

  • define and write input file(s) for Cloudy code. As you can have it in a code, you may generate automatically sets of input files, changing parameters from one to the other.
  • read the Cloudy output files and play with the data: you will be able to plot line emissivity ratio vs. the radius of the nebula, the electron temperature, or any Cloudy output.
  • build pseudo-3D models, a la Cloudy_3D, by running a set of models, changing parameters (e.g. inner radius, density) following angular laws, reading the outputs of the set of models and interpolating the results (Te, ne, line emissivities) in a 3D cube.

[ascl:1805.032] PyCCF: Python Cross Correlation Function for reverberation mapping studies

PyCCF emulates a Fortran program written by B. Peterson for use with reverberation mapping. The code cross correlates two light curves that are unevenly sampled using linear interpolation and measures the peak and centroid of the cross-correlation function. In addition, it is possible to run Monto Carlo iterations using flux randomization and random subset selection (RSS) to produce cross-correlation centroid distributions to estimate the uncertainties in the cross correlation results.

[ascl:1805.030] PyCBC: Gravitational-wave data analysis toolkit

PyCBC analyzes data from gravitational-wave laser interferometer detectors, finds signals, and studies their parameters. It contains algorithms that can detect coalescing compact binaries and measure the astrophysical parameters of detected sources. PyCBC was used in the first direct detection of gravitational waves by LIGO and is used in the ongoing analysis of LIGO and Virgo data.

[ascl:1204.002] pyBLoCXS: Bayesian Low-Count X-ray Spectral analysis

pyBLoCXS is a sophisticated Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based algorithm designed to carry out Bayesian Low-Count X-ray Spectral (BLoCXS) analysis in the Sherpa environment. The code is a Python extension to Sherpa that explores parameter space at a suspected minimum using a predefined Sherpa model to high-energy X-ray spectral data. pyBLoCXS includes a flexible definition of priors and allows for variations in the calibration information. It can be used to compute posterior predictive p-values for the likelihood ratio test. The pyBLoCXS code has been tested with a number of simple single-component spectral models; it should be used with great care in more complex settings.

[ascl:1502.007] PyBDSF: Python Blob Detection and Source Finder

PyBDSF (Python Blob Detector and Source Finder, formerly PyBDSM) decomposes radio interferometry images into sources and makes their properties available for further use. PyBDSF can decompose an image into a set of Gaussians, shapelets, or wavelets as well as calculate spectral indices and polarization properties of sources and measure the psf variation across an image. PyBDSF uses an interactive environment based on CASA (ascl:1107.013); PyBDSF may also be used in Python scripts.

[ascl:1807.003] PyAutoLens: Strong lens modeling

PyAutoLens models and analyzes galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. This automated module suite simultaneously models the lens galaxy's light and mass while reconstructing the extended source galaxy on an adaptive pixel-grid. Source-plane discretization is amorphous, adapting its clustering and regularization to the intrinsic properties of the lensed source. The lens's light is fitted using a superposition of Sersic functions, allowing PyAutoLens to cleanly deblend its light from the source. Bayesian model comparison is used to automatically chose the complexity of the light and mass models. PyAutoLens provides accurate light, mass, and source profiles inferred for data sets representative of both existing Hubble imaging and future Euclid wide-field observations.

[ascl:1707.003] pyaneti: Multi-planet radial velocity and transit fitting

Pyaneti is a multi-planet radial velocity and transit fit software. The code uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods with a Bayesian approach and a parallelized ensemble sampler algorithm in Fortran which makes the code fast. It creates posteriors, correlations, and ready-to-publish plots automatically, and handles circular and eccentric orbits. It is capable of multi-planet fitting and handles stellar limb darkening, systemic velocities for multiple instruments, and short and long cadence data, and offers additional capabilities.

[ascl:1806.007] PyAMOR: AMmOnia data Reduction

PyAMOR models spectra of low level ammonia transitions (between (J,K)=(1,1) and (5,5)) and derives parameters such as intrinsic linewidth, optical depth, and rotation temperature. For low S/N or low spectral resolution data, the code uses cross-correlation between a model and a regridded spectrum (e.g. 10 times smaller channel width) to find the velocity, then fixes it and runs the minimization process. For high S/N data, PyAMOR runs with the velocity as a free parameter.

[ascl:1906.010] PyA: Python astronomy-related packages

The PyA (PyAstronomy) suite of astronomy-related packages includes a convenient fitting package that provides support for minimization and MCMC sampling, a set of astrophysical models (e.g., transit light-curve modeling), and algorithms for timing analysis such as the Lomb-Scargle and the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodograms.

[ascl:1905.002] Py4CAtS: PYthon for Computational ATmospheric Spectroscopy

Py4CAtS (PYthon scripts for Computational ATmospheric Spectroscopy) implements the individual steps of an infrared or microwave radiative transfer computation in separate scripts (and corresponding functions) to extract lines of relevant molecules in the spectral range of interest, compute line-by-line cross sections for given pressure(s) and temperature(s), combine cross sections to absorption coefficients and optical depths, and integrate along the line-of-sight to transmission and radiance/intensity. The code is a Python re-implementation of the Fortran code GARLIC (Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Code) and uses the Numeric/Scientific Python modules for computationally-intensive highly optimized array-processing. Py4CAtS can be used in the console/terminal, inside the (I)Python interpreter, and in Jupyter notebooks.

[ascl:1712.003] Py-SPHViewer: Cosmological simulations using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

Py-SPHViewer visualizes and explores N-body + Hydrodynamics simulations. The code interpolates the underlying density field (or any other property) traced by a set of particles, using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) interpolation scheme, thus producing not only beautiful but also useful scientific images. Py-SPHViewer enables the user to explore simulated volumes using different projections. Py-SPHViewer also provides a natural way to visualize (in a self-consistent fashion) gas dynamical simulations, which use the same technique to compute the interactions between particles.

[ascl:1808.009] py-sdm: Support Distribution Machines

py-sdm (Support Distribution Machines) is a Python implementation of nonparametric nearest-neighbor-based estimators for divergences between distributions for machine learning on sets of data rather than individual data points. It treats points of sets of data as samples from some unknown probability distribution and then statistically estimates the distance between those distributions, such as the KL divergence, the closely related Rényi divergence, L2 distance, or other similar distances.

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