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[ascl:2008.011] Magnetizer: Computing magnetic fields of evolving galaxies

Magnetizer computes time and radial dependent magnetic fields for a sample of galaxies in the output of a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The magnetic field is obtained by numerically solving the galactic dynamo equations throughout history of each galaxy. Stokes parameters and Faraday rotation measure can also be computed along a random line-of-sight for each galaxy.

[ascl:1502.014] Magnetron: Fitting bursts from magnetars

Magnetron, written in Python, decomposes magnetar bursts into a superposition of small spike-like features with a simple functional form, where the number of model components is itself part of the inference problem. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and reversible jumps between models with different numbers of parameters are used to characterize the posterior distributions of the model parameters and the number of components per burst.

[ascl:1106.010] MAGPHYS: Multi-wavelength Analysis of Galaxy Physical Properties

MAGPHYS is a self-contained, user-friendly model package to interpret observed spectral energy distributions of galaxies in terms of galaxy-wide physical parameters pertaining to the stars and the interstellar medium. MAGPHYS is optimized to derive statistical constraints of fundamental parameters related to star formation activity and dust content (e.g. star formation rate, stellar mass, dust attenuation, dust temperatures) of large samples of galaxies using a wide range of multi-wavelength observations. A Bayesian approach is used to interpret the SEDs all the way from the ultraviolet/optical to the far-infrared.

[ascl:1307.009] MAH: Minimum Atmospheric Height

MAH calculates the posterior distribution of the "minimum atmospheric height" (MAH) of an exoplanet by inputting the joint posterior distribution of the mass and radius. The code collapses the two dimensions of mass and radius into a one dimensional term that most directly speaks to whether the planet has an atmosphere or not. The joint mass-radius posteriors derived from a fit of some exoplanet data (likely using MCMC) can be used by MAH to evaluate the posterior distribution of R_MAH, from which the significance of a non-zero R_MAH (i.e. an atmosphere is present) is calculated.

[ascl:1502.021] MaLTPyNT: Quick look timing analysis for NuSTAR data

MaLTPyNT (Matteo's Libraries and Tools in Python for NuSTAR Timing) provides a quick-look timing analysis of NuSTAR data, properly treating orbital gaps and exploiting the presence of two independent detectors by using the cospectrum as a proxy for the power density spectrum. The output of the analysis is a cospectrum, or a power density spectrum, that can be fitted with XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) or ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The software also calculates time lags. Though written for NuSTAR data, MaLTPyNT can also perform standard spectral analysis on X-ray data from other satellite such as XMM-Newton and RXTE.

[ascl:1202.005] Mangle: Angular Mask Software

Mangle deals accurately and efficiently with complex angular masks, such as occur typically in galaxy surveys. Mangle performs the following tasks: converts masks between many handy formats (including HEALPix); rapidly finds the polygons containing a given point on the sphere; rapidly decomposes a set of polygons into disjoint parts; expands masks in spherical harmonics; generates random points with weights given by the mask; and implements computations for correlation function analysis. To mangle, a mask is an arbitrary union of arbitrarily weighted angular regions bounded by arbitrary numbers of edges. The restrictions on the mask are only (1) that each edge must be part of some circle on the sphere (but not necessarily a great circle), and (2) that the weight within each subregion of the mask must be constant. Mangle is complementary to and integrated with the HEALPix package (ascl:1107.018); mangle works with vector graphics whereas HEALPix works with pixels.

[ascl:1305.012] MapCUMBA: Multi-grid map-making algorithm for CMB experiments

The MapCUMBA package applies a multigrid fast iterative Jacobi algorithm for map-making in the context of CMB experiments.

[ascl:1308.003] MapCurvature: Map Projections

MapCurvature, written in IDL, can create map projections with Goldberg-Gott indicatrices. These indicatrices measure the flexion and skewness of a map, and are useful for determining whether features are faithfully reproduced on a particular projection.

[ascl:1306.008] MAPPINGS III: Modelling And Prediction in PhotoIonized Nebulae and Gasdynamical Shocks

MAPPINGS III is a general purpose astrophysical plasma modelling code. It is principally intended to predict emission line spectra of medium and low density plasmas subjected to different levels of photoionization and ionization by shockwaves. MAPPINGS III tracks up to 16 atomic species in all stages of ionization, over a useful range of 102 to 108 K. It treats spherical and plane parallel geometries in equilibrium and time-dependent models. MAPPINGS III is useful for computing models of HI and HII regions, planetary nebulae, novae, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro shocks, active galaxies, the intergalactic medium and the interstellar medium in general. The present version of MAPPINGS III is a large FORTRAN program that runs with a simple TTY interface for historical and portability reasons.

[ascl:1807.005] MAPPINGS V: Astrophysical plasma modeling code

MAPPINGS V is a update of the MAPPINGS code (ascl:1306.008) and provides new cooling function computations for optically thin plasmas based on the greatly expanded atomic data of the CHIANTI 8 database. The number of cooling and recombination lines has been expanded from ~2000 to over 80,000, and temperature-dependent spline-based collisional data have been adopted for the majority of transitions. The expanded atomic data set provides improved modeling of both thermally ionized and photoionized plasmas; the code is now capable of predicting detailed X-ray spectra of nonequilibrium plasmas over the full nonrelativistic temperature range, increasing its utility in cosmological simulations, in modeling cooling flows, and in generating accurate models for the X-ray emission from shocks in supernova remnants.

[ascl:2003.010] MARGE: Machine learning Algorithm for Radiative transfer of Generated Exoplanets

MARGE (Machine learning Algorithm for Radiative transfer of Generated Exoplanets) generates exoplanet spectra across a defined parameter space, processes the output, and trains, validates, and tests machine learning models as a fast approximation to radiative transfer. It uses BART (ascl:1608.004) for spectra generation and modifies BART’s Bayesian sampler (MC3, ascl:1610.013) with a random uniform sampler to propose models within a defined parameter space. More generally, MARGE provides a framework for training neural network models to approximate a forward, deterministic process.

[ascl:1011.004] MARS: The MAGIC Analysis and Reconstruction Software

With the commissioning of the second MAGIC gamma-ray Cherenkov telescope situated close to MAGIC-I, the standard analysis package of the MAGIC collaboration, MARS, has been upgraded in order to perform the stereoscopic reconstruction of the detected atmospheric showers. MARS is a ROOT-based code written in C++, which includes all the necessary algorithms to transform the raw data recorded by the telescopes into information about the physics parameters of the observed targets. An overview of the methods for extracting the basic shower parameters is presented, together with a description of the tools used in the background discrimination and in the estimation of the gamma-ray source spectra.

[ascl:1910.015] MarsLux: Illumination Mars maps generator

MarsLux generates illumination maps of Mars from Digital Terrain Model (DTM), permitting users to investigate in detail the illumination conditions on Mars based on its topography and the relative position of the Sun. MarsLux consists of two Python codes, SolaPar and MarsLux. SolaPar calculates the matrix with solar parameters for one date or a range between the two. The Marslux code generates the illumination maps using the same DTM and the files generated by SolaPar. The resulting illumination maps show areas that are fully illuminated, areas in total shadow, and areas with partial shade, and can be used for geomorphological studies to examine gullies, thermal weathering, or mass wasting processes as well as for producing energy budget maps for future exploration missions.

[ascl:1911.005] MARTINI: Mock spatially resolved spectral line observations of simulated galaxies

MARTINI (Mock APERTIF-like Radio Telescope Interferometry of the Neutal ISM) creates synthetic resolved HI line observations (data cubes) of smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies. The various aspects of the mock-observing process are divided logically into sub-modules handling the data cube, source, beam, noise, spectral model and SPH kernel. MARTINI is object-oriented: each sub-module provides a class (or classes) which can be configured as desired. For most sub-modules, base classes are provided to allow for straightforward customization. Instances of each sub-module class are then given as parameters to the Martini class. A mock observation is then constructed by calling a handful of functions to execute the desired steps in the mock-observing process.

[ascl:1302.001] MARX: Model of AXAF Response to X-rays

MARX (Model of AXAF Response to X-rays) is a suite of programs designed to enable the user to simulate the on-orbit performance of the Chandra satellite. MARX provides a detailed ray-trace simulation of how Chandra responds to a variety of astrophysical sources and can generate standard FITS events files and images as output. It contains models for the HRMA mirror system onboard Chandra as well as the HETG and LETG gratings and all focal plane detectors.

[ascl:1711.020] MARXS: Multi-Architecture Raytrace Xray mission Simulator

MARXS (Multi-Architecture-Raytrace-Xraymission-Simulator) simulates X-ray observatories. Primarily designed to simulate X-ray instruments on astronomical X-ray satellites and sounding rocket payloads, it can also be used to ray-trace experiments in the laboratory. MARXS performs polarization Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations from a source (astronomical or lab) through a collection of optical elements such as mirrors, baffles, and gratings to a detector.

[ascl:1605.001] MARZ: Redshifting Program

MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

[ascl:1101.009] MasQU: Finite Differences on Masked Irregular Stokes Q,U Grids

The detection of B-mode polarization in the CMB is one of the most important outstanding tests of inflationary cosmology. One of the necessary steps for extracting polarization information in the CMB is reducing contamination from so-called "ambiguous modes" on a masked sky, which contain leakage from the larger E-mode signal. This can be achieved by utilising derivative operators on the real-space Stokes Q and U parameters. This paper presents an algorithm and a software package to perform this procedure on the nearly full sky, i.e., with projects such as the Planck Surveyor and future satellites in mind; in particular, the package can perform finite differences on masked, irregular grids and is applied to a semi-regular spherical pixellization, the HEALPix grid. The formalism reduces to the known finite-difference solutions in the case of a regular grid. We quantify full-sky improvements on the possible bounds on the CMB B-mode signal. We find that in the specific case of E and B-mode separation, there exists a "pole problem" in our formalism which produces signal contamination at very low multipoles l. Several solutions to the "pole problem" are presented; one proposed solution facilitates a calculation of a general Gaussian quadrature scheme, which finds application in calculating accurate harmonic coefficients on the HEALPix sphere. Nevertheless, on a masked sphere the software represents a considerable reduction in B-mode noise from limited sky coverage.

[ascl:1104.004] MASSCLEAN: MASSive CLuster Evolution and ANalysis Package

MASSCLEAN is a sophisticated and robust stellar cluster image and photometry simulation package. This package is able to create color-magnitude diagrams and standard FITS images in any of the traditional optical and near-infrared bands based on cluster characteristics input by the user, including but not limited to distance, age, mass, radius and extinction. At the limit of very distant, unresolved clusters, we have checked the integrated colors created in MASSCLEAN against those from other simple stellar population (SSP) models with consistent results. Because the algorithm populates the cluster with a discrete number of tenable stars, it can be used as part of a Monte Carlo Method to derive the probabilistic range of characteristics (integrated colors, for example) consistent with a given cluster mass and age.

[ascl:1401.008] massconvert: Halo Mass Conversion

massconvert, written in Fortran, provides driver and fitting routines for converting halo mass definitions from one spherical overdensity to another assuming an NFW density profile. In surveys that probe ever lower cluster masses and temperatures, sample variance is generally comparable to or greater than shot noise and thus cannot be neglected in deriving precision cosmological constraints; massconvert offers an accurate fitting formula for the conversion between different definitions of halo mass.

[ascl:1406.010] MATCH: A program for matching star lists

MATCH matches up items in two different lists, which can have two different systems of coordinates. The program allows the two sets of coordinates to be related by a linear, quadratic, or cubic transformation. MATCH was designed and written to work on lists of stars and other astronomical objects but can be applied to other types of data. In order to match two lists of N points, the main algorithm calls for O(N^6) operations; though not the most efficient choice, it does allow for arbitrary translation, rotation, and scaling.

[ascl:1601.018] MATPHOT: Stellar photometry and astrometry with discrete point spread functions

A discrete Point Spread Function (PSF) is a sampled version of a continuous two-dimensional PSF. The shape information about the photon scattering pattern of a discrete PSF is typically encoded using a numerical table (matrix) or a FITS image file. MATPHOT shifts discrete PSFs within an observational model using a 21-pixel- wide damped sinc function and position partial derivatives are computed using a five-point numerical differentiation formula. MATPHOT achieves accurate and precise stellar photometry and astrometry of undersampled CCD observations by using supersampled discrete PSFs that are sampled two, three, or more times more finely than the observational data.

[ascl:2008.018] maxsmooth: Derivative constrained function fitting

maxsmooth fits derivative constrained functions (DCF) such as Maximally Smooth Functions (MSFs) to data sets. MSFs are functions for which there are no zero crossings in derivatives of order m >= 2 within the domain of interest. They are designed to prevent the loss of signals when fitting out dominant smooth foregrounds or large magnitude signals that mask signals of interest. Here "smooth" means that the foregrounds follow power law structures and do not feature turning points in the band of interest. maxsmooth uses quadratic programming implemented with CVXOPT (ascl:2008.017) to fit data subject to a fixed linear constraint, Ga <= 0, where the product Ga is a matrix of derivatives. The code tests the <= 0 constraint multiplied by a positive or negative sign and can test every available sign combination but by default, it implements a sign navigating algorithm.

[ascl:1205.008] Mayavi2: 3D Scientific Data Visualization and Plotting

Mayavi provides general-purpose 3D scientific visualizations. It offers easy interactive tools for data visualization that fit with the scientific user's workflow. Mayavi provides several entry points: a full-blown interactive application; a Python library with both a MATLAB-like interface focused on easy scripting and a feature-rich object hierarchy; widgets associated with these objects for assembling in a domain-specific application, and plugins that work with a general purpose application-building framework.

[ascl:1602.020] mbb_emcee: Modified Blackbody MCMC

Mbb_emcee fits modified blackbodies to photometry data using an affine invariant MCMC. It has large number of options which, for example, allow computation of the IR luminosity or dustmass as part of the fit. Carrying out a fit produces a HDF5 output file containing the results, which can either be read directly, or read back into a mbb_results object for analysis. Upper and lower limits can be imposed as well as Gaussian priors on the model parameters. These additions are useful for analyzing poorly constrained data. In addition to standard Python packages scipy, numpy, and cython, mbb_emcee requires emcee (ascl:1303.002), Astropy (ascl:1304.002), h5py, and for unit tests, nose.

[ascl:2010.001] MBF: MOLSCAT 2020, BOUND, and FIELD for atomic and molecular collisions

MOLSCAT, which supercedes MOLSCAT version 14 (ascl:1206.004), performs non-reactive quantum scattering calculations for atomic and molecular collisions using coupled-channel methods. Simple atom-molecule and molecule-molecule collision types are coded internally and additional ones may be handled with plug-in routines. Plug-in routines may include external magnetic, electric or photon fields (and combinations of them).

The package also includes BOUND, which performs calculations of bound-state energies in weakly bound atomic and molecular systems using coupled-channel methods, and FIELD, a development of BOUND that locates values of external fields at which a bound state exists with a specified energy. Though the three programs have different applications, they use closely related methods, share many subroutines, and are released with a single code base.

[ascl:1705.008] MBProj2: Multi-Band x-ray surface brightness PROJector 2

MBProj2 obtains thermodynamic profiles of galaxy clusters. It forward-models cluster X-ray surface brightness profiles in multiple bands, optionally assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The code is a set of Python classes the user can use or extend. When modelling a cluster assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, the user chooses a form for the density profile (e.g. binning or a beta model), the metallicity profile, and the dark matter profile (e.g. NFW). If hydrostatic equilibrium is not assumed, a temperature profile model is used instead of the dark matter profile. The code uses the emcee Markov Chain Monte Carlo code (ascl:1303.002) to sample the model parameters, using these to produce chains of thermodynamic profiles.

[ascl:1703.014] MC-SPAM: Monte-Carlo Synthetic-Photometry/Atmosphere-Model

MC-SPAM (Monte-Carlo Synthetic-Photometry/Atmosphere-Model) generates limb-darkening coefficients from models that are comparable to transit photometry; it extends the original SPAM algorithm by Howarth (2011) by taking in consideration the uncertainty on the stellar and transit parameters of the system under analysis.

[ascl:1610.013] MC3: Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo code

MC3 (Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo) is a Bayesian statistics tool that can be executed from the shell prompt or interactively through the Python interpreter with single- or multiple-CPU parallel computing. It offers Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) posterior-distribution sampling for several algorithms, Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares optimization, and uniform non-informative, Jeffreys non-informative, or Gaussian-informative priors. MC3 can share the same value among multiple parameters and fix the value of parameters to constant values, and offers Gelman-Rubin convergence testing and correlated-noise estimation with time-averaging or wavelet-based likelihood estimation methods.

[ascl:1204.005] MC3D: Monte-Carlo 3D Radiative Transfer Code

MC3D is a 3D continuum radiative transfer code; it is based on the Monte-Carlo method and solves the radiative transfer problem self-consistently. It is designed for the simulation of dust temperatures in arbitrary geometric configurations and the resulting observables: spectral energy distributions, wavelength-dependent images, and polarization maps. The main objective is the investigation of "dust-dominated" astrophysical systems such as young stellar objects surrounded by an optically thick circumstellar disk and an optically thin(ner) envelope, debris disks around more evolved stars, asymptotic giant branch stars, the dust component of the interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei.

[ascl:1511.008] MCAL: M dwarf metallicity and temperature calculator

MCAL calculates high precision metallicities and effective temperatures for M dwarfs; the method behaves properly down to R = 40 000 and S/N = 25, and results were validated against a sample of stars in common with SOPHIE high resolution spectra.

[ascl:1906.017] mcfit: Multiplicatively Convolutional Fast Integral Transforms

mcfit computes integral transforms, inverse transforms without analytic inversion, and integral kernels as derivatives. It can also transform input array along any axis, output the matrix form, an is easily extensible for other kernels.

[ascl:1107.015] McLuster: A Tool to Make a Star Cluster

The tool McLuster is an open source code that can be used to either set up initial conditions for N-body computations or, alternatively, to generate artificial star clusters for direct investigation. There are two different versions of the code, one basic version for generating all kinds of unevolved clusters (in the following called mcluster) and one for setting up evolved stellar populations at a given age. The former is completely contained in the C file main.c. The latter (dubbed mcluster_sse) is more complex and requires additional FORTRAN routines, namely the Single-Star Evolution (SSE) routines by Hurley, Pols & Tout (ascl:1303.015) that are provided with the McLuster code.

[ascl:1407.004] MCMAC: Monte Carlo Merger Analysis Code

Monte Carlo Merger Analysis Code (MCMAC) aids in the study of merging clusters. It takes observed priors on each subcluster's mass, radial velocity, and projected separation, draws randomly from those priors, and uses them in a analytic model to get posterior PDF's for merger dynamic properties of interest (e.g. collision velocity, time since collision).

[ascl:2001.012] MCMCI: Markov Chain Monte Carlo + Isochrones method for characterizing exoplanetary systems

MCMCI (Markov chain Monte Carlo + isochrones) characterizes a whole exoplanetary system directly by modeling the star and its planets simultaneously. The code, written in Fortran, uses light curves and basic stellar parameters with a transit analysis algorithm that interacts with stellar evolutionary models, thus using both model-dependent and empirical age indicators to characterize the system.

[ascl:1210.017] McPHAC: McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code

The McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code (McPHAC) v1.1 calculates the hydrostatic equilibrium structure and emergent spectrum of an unmagnetized hydrogen atmosphere in the plane-parallel approximation at surface gravities appropriate for neutron stars. McPHAC incorporates several improvements over previous codes for which tabulated model spectra are available: (1) Thomson scattering is treated anisotropically, which is shown to result in a 0.2%-3% correction in the emergent spectral flux across the 0.1-5 keV passband; (2) the McPHAC source code is made available to the community, allowing it to be scrutinized and modified by other researchers wishing to study or extend its capabilities; and (3) the numerical uncertainty resulting from the discrete and iterative solution is studied as a function of photon energy, indicating that McPHAC is capable of producing spectra with numerical uncertainties <0.01%. The accuracy of the spectra may at present be limited to ~1%, but McPHAC enables researchers to study the impact of uncertain inputs and additional physical effects, thereby supporting future efforts to reduce those inaccuracies. Comparison of McPHAC results with spectra from one of the previous model atmosphere codes (NSA) shows agreement to lsim1% near the peaks of the emergent spectra. However, in the Wien tail a significant deficit of flux in the spectra of the previous model is revealed, determined to be due to the previous work not considering large enough optical depths at the highest photon frequencies. The deficit is most significant for spectra with T eff < 105.6 K, though even there it may not be of much practical importance for most observations.

[ascl:2005.019] MCRaT: Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer

MCRaT (Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer) analyzes the radiation signature expected from astrophysical outflows. MCRaT injects photons in a FLASH (ascl:1010.082) simulation and individually propagates and compton scatters the photons through the fluid until the end of the simulation. This process of injection and propagating occurs for a user specified number of times until there are no more photons to be injected. Users can then construct light curves and spectra with the MCRaT calculated results. The hydrodynamic simulations used with this version of MCRaT must be in 2D; however, the photon propagation and scattering is done in 3D by assuming cylindrical symmetry. Additionally, MCRaT uses the full Klein–Nishina cross section including the effects of polarization, which can be fully simulated in the code. MCRaT works with FLASH hydrodynamic simulations and PLUTO (ascl:1010.045) AMR simulations, with both 2D spherical (r, equation) and 2D cartesian ((x,y) and (r,z)).

[ascl:1907.026] MCRGNet: Morphological Classification of Radio Galaxy Network

MCRGNet (Morphological Classification of Radio Galaxy Network) classifies radio galaxies of different morphologies. It is based on the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), which is trained and applied under a three-step framework: 1.) pretraining the network unsupervisedly with unlabeled samples, 2.) fine-tuning the pretrained network parameters supervisedly with labeled samples, and 3.) classifying a new radio galaxy by the trained network. The code uses a dichotomous tree classifier composed of cascaded CNN based subclassifiers.

[ascl:1201.001] McScatter: Three-Body Scattering with Stellar Evolution

McScatter illustrates a method of combining stellar dynamics with stellar evolution. The method is intended for elaborate applications, especially the dynamical evolution of rich star clusters. The dynamics is based on binary scattering in a multi-mass field of stars with uniform density and velocity dispersion, using the scattering cross section of Giersz (MNRAS, 2001, 324, 218-30).

[ascl:2006.022] MCSED: Spectral energy distribution fitting package for galactic systems

MCSED models the optical, near-infrared and infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of galactic systems. Its modularity and options make it flexible and able to address the varying physical properties of galaxies over cosmic time and environment and adjust to changes in understanding of stellar evolution, the details of mass loss, and the products of binary evolution through substitution or addition of new datasets or algorithms. MCSED is built to fit a galaxy’s full SED, from the far-UV to the far-IR. Among other physical processes, it can model continuum emission from stars, continuum and line-emission from ionized gas, attenuation from dust, and mid- and far-IR emission from dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). MCSED performs its calculations by creating a complex stellar population (CSP) out of a linear combination of simple-stellar populations (SSPs) using an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. It is very quick, and takes advantage of parallel processing.

[ascl:1504.008] MCSpearman: Monte Carlo error analyses of Spearman's rank test

Spearman’s rank correlation test is commonly used in astronomy to discern whether a set of two variables are correlated or not. Unlike most other quantities quoted in astronomical literature, the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient is generally quoted with no attempt to estimate the errors on its value. This code implements a number of Monte Carlo based methods to estimate the uncertainty on the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient.

[ascl:1302.012] ME(SSY)**2: Monte Carlo Code for Star Cluster Simulations

ME(SSY)**2 stands for “Monte-carlo Experiments with Spherically SYmmetric Stellar SYstems." This code simulates the long term evolution of spherical clusters of stars; it was devised specifically to treat dense galactic nuclei. It is based on the pioneering Monte Carlo scheme proposed by Hénon in the 70's and includes all relevant physical ingredients (2-body relaxation, stellar mass spectrum, collisions, tidal disruption, ldots). It is basically a Monte Carlo resolution of the Fokker-Planck equation. It can cope with any stellar mass spectrum or velocity distribution. Being a particle-based method, it also allows one to take stellar collisions into account in a very realistic way. This unique code, featuring most important physical processes, allows million particle simulations, spanning a Hubble time, in a few CPU days on standard personal computers and provides a wealth of data only rivalized by N-body simulations. The current version of the software requires the use of routines from the "Numerical Recipes in Fortran 77" (http://www.nrbook.com/a/bookfpdf.php).

[ascl:1205.001] Mechanic: Numerical MPI framework for dynamical astronomy

The Mechanic package is a numerical framework for dynamical astronomy, designed to help in massive numerical simulations by efficient task management and unified data storage. The code is built on top of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) standards and uses the Task Farm approach to manage numerical tasks. It relies on the core-module approach. The numerical problem implemented in the user-supplied module is separated from the host code (core). The core is designed to handle basic setup, data storage and communication between nodes in a computing pool. It has been tested on large CPU-clusters, as well as desktop computers. The Mechanic may be used in computing dynamical maps, data optimization or numerical integration.

[ascl:1106.006] MECI: A Method for Eclipsing Component Identification

We describe an automated method for assigning the most probable physical parameters to the components of an eclipsing binary, using only its photometric light curve and combined colors. With traditional methods, one attempts to optimize a multi-parameter model over many iterations, so as to minimize the chi-squared value. We suggest an alternative method, where one selects pairs of coeval stars from a set of theoretical stellar models, and compares their simulated light curves and combined colors with the observations. This approach greatly reduces the parameter space over which one needs to search, and allows one to estimate the components' masses, radii and absolute magnitudes, without spectroscopic data. We have implemented this method in an automated program using published theoretical isochrones and limb-darkening coefficients. Since it is easy to automate, this method lends itself to systematic analyses of datasets consisting of photometric time series of large numbers of stars, such as those produced by OGLE, MACHO, TrES, HAT, and many others surveys.

[ascl:1906.018] MEGAlib: Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy library

The Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy library (MEGAlib) simulates, calibrates, and analyzes data of hard X-ray and gamma-ray detectors, with a specialization on Compton telescopes. The library comprises all necessary data analysis steps for these telescopes, from simulation/measurements via calibration, event reconstruction to image reconstruction.

MEGAlib contains a geometry and detector description tool for the detailed modeling of different detector types and characteristics, and provides an easy to use simulation program based on Geant4 (ascl:1010.079). For different Compton telescope detector types (electron tracking, multiple Compton or time of flight based), specialized Compton event reconstruction algorithms are implemented in different approaches (Chi-square and Bayesian). The high level data analysis tools calculate response matrices, perform image deconvolution (specialized in list-mode-likelihood-based Compton image reconstruction), determine detector resolutions and sensitivities, retrieve spectra, and determine polarization modulations.

[ascl:1203.008] MegaLUT: Correcting ellipticity measurements of galaxies

MegaLUT is a simple and fast method to correct ellipticity measurements of galaxies from the distortion by the instrumental and atmospheric point spread function (PSF), in view of weak lensing shear measurements. The method performs a classification of galaxies and associated PSFs according to measured shape parameters, and builds a lookup table of ellipticity corrections by supervised learning. This new method has been applied to the GREAT10 image analysis challenge, and demonstrates a refined solution that obtains the highly competitive quality factor of Q = 142, without any power spectrum denoising or training. Of particular interest is the efficiency of the method, with a processing time below 3 ms per galaxy on an ordinary CPU.

[ascl:1711.012] megaman: Manifold Learning for Millions of Points

megaman is a scalable manifold learning package implemented in python. It has a front-end API designed to be familiar to scikit-learn but harnesses the C++ Fast Library for Approximate Nearest Neighbors (FLANN) and the Sparse Symmetric Positive Definite (SSPD) solver Locally Optimal Block Precodition Gradient (LOBPCG) method to scale manifold learning algorithms to large data sets. It is designed for researchers and as such caches intermediary steps and indices to allow for fast re-computation with new parameters.

[ascl:1410.002] MEPSA: Multiple Excess Peak Search Algorithm

MEPSA (Multiple Excess Peak Search Algorithm) identifies peaks within a uniformly sampled time series affected by uncorrelated Gaussian noise. MEPSA scans the time series at different timescales by comparing a given peak candidate with a variable number of adjacent bins. While this has originally been conceived for the analysis of gamma-ray burst light (GRB) curves, its usage can be readily extended to other astrophysical transient phenomena whose activity is recorded through different surveys. MEPSA's high flexibility permits the mask of excess patterns it uses to be tailored and optimized without modifying the code.

[ascl:1209.010] MeqTrees: Software package for implementing Measurement Equations

MeqTrees is a software package for implementing Measurement Equations. This makes it uniquely suited for simulation and calibration of radioastronomical data, especially that involving new radiotelescopes and observational regimes. MeqTrees is implemented as a Python-based front-end called the meqbrowser, and an efficient (C++-based) computational back-end called the meqserver. Numerical models are defined on the front-end via a Python-based Tree Definition Language (TDL), then rapidly executed on the back-end. The use of TDL facilitates an extremely short turn-around time for experimentation with new ideas. This is also helped by unprecedented visualization capabilities for all final and intermediate results. A flexible data model and a number of important optimizations in the back-end ensures that the numerical performance is comparable to that of hand-written code.

MeqTrees includes a highly capable FITS viewer and sky model manager called Tigger, which can also work as a standalone tool.

[submitted] MERA: Analysis Tool for Astrophysical Simulation Data in the Julia Language

MERA works with large 3D AMR/uniform-grid and N-body particle data sets from astrophysical simulations such as those produced by the hydrodynamic code RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) and is written entirely in the Julia language. The package provides essential functions for efficient and memory lightweight data loading and analysis. The core of MERA is a database framework.

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