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[ascl:1904.011] FortesFit: Flexible spectral energy distribution modelling with a Bayesian backbone

FortesFit efficiently explores and discriminates between various spectral energy distributions (SED) models of astronomical sources. The Python package adds Bayesian inference to a framework that is designed for the easy incorporation and relative assessment of SED models, various fitting engines, and a powerful treatment of priors, especially those that may arise from non-traditional wave-bands such as the X-ray or radio emission, or from spectroscopic measurements. It has been designed with particular emphasis for its scalability to large datasets and surveys.

[ascl:1405.007] FORWARD: Forward modeling of coronal observables

FORWARD forward models various coronal observables and can access and compare existing data. Given a coronal model, it can produce many different synthetic observables (including Stokes polarimetry), as well as plots of model plasma properties (density, magnetic field, etc.). It uses the CHIANTI database (ascl:9911.004) and CLE polarimetry synthesis code, works with numerical model datacubes, interfaces with the PFSS module of SolarSoft (ascl:1208.013), includes several analytic models, and connects to the Virtual Solar Observatory for downloading data in a format directly comparable to model predictions.

[ascl:1204.004] Fosite: 2D advection problem solver

Fosite implements a method for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. It is written in Fortran 90/95 integrating object-oriented (OO) design patterns, incorporating the flexibility of OO-programming into Fortran 90/95 while preserving the efficiency of the numerical computation. Although mainly intended for CFD simulations, Fosite's modular design allows its application to other advection problems as well. Unlike other two-dimensional implementations of finite volume methods, it accounts for local conservation of specific angular momentum. This feature turns the program into a perfect tool for astrophysical simulations where angular momentum transport is crucial. Angular momentum transport is not only implemented for standard coordinate systems with rotational symmetry (i.e. cylindrical, spherical) but also for a general set of orthogonal coordinate systems allowing the use of exotic curvilinear meshes (e.g. oblate-spheroidal). As in the case of the advection problem, this part of the software is also kept modular, therefore new geometries may be incorporated into the framework in a straightforward manner.

[ascl:1610.012] Fourierdimredn: Fourier dimensionality reduction model for interferometric imaging

Fourierdimredn (Fourier dimensionality reduction) implements Fourier-based dimensionality reduction of interferometric data. Written in Matlab, it derives the theoretically optimal dimensionality reduction operator from a singular value decomposition perspective of the measurement operator. Fourierdimredn ensures a fast implementation of the full measurement operator and also preserves the i.i.d. Gaussian properties of the original measurement noise.

[ascl:1806.030] foxi: Forecast Observations and their eXpected Information

Using information theory and Bayesian inference, the foxi Python package computes a suite of expected utilities given futuristic observations in a flexible and user-friendly way. foxi requires a set of n-dim prior samples for each model and one set of n-dim samples from the current data, and can calculate the expected ln-Bayes factor between models, decisiveness between models and its maximum-likelihood averaged equivalent, the decisivity, and the expected Kullback-Leibler divergence (i.e., the expected information gain of the futuristic dataset). The package offers flexible inputs and is designed for all-in-one script calculation or an initial cluster run then local machine post-processing, which should make large jobs quite manageable subject to resources and includes features such as LaTeX tables and plot-making for post-data analysis visuals and convenience of presentation.

[ascl:1010.002] fpack: FITS Image Compression Program

fpack is a utility program for optimally compressing images in the FITS data format. The associated funpack program will restore the compressed file back to its original state. These programs may be run from the host operating system command line and are analogous to the gzip and gunzip utility programs, except that they are specifically optimized for FITS format images and offer a wider choice of compression options.

fpack uses the tiled image compression convention for storing the compressed images. This convention can in principle support any number of of different compression algorithms; currently GZIP, Rice, Hcompress, and the IRAF pixel list compression algorithms have been implemented.

The main advantages of fpack compared to the commonly used technique of externally compressing the whole FITS file with gzip are:

  1. It is generally faster and offers better compression than gzip.
  2. The FITS header keywords remain uncompressed for fast access.
  3. Each HDU of a multi-extension FITS file is compressed separately, so it is not necessary to uncompress the entire file to read a single image in a multi-extension file.
  4. Dividing the image into tiles before compression enables faster access to small subsections of the image.
  5. The compressed image is itself a valid FITS file and can be manipulated by other general FITS utility software.
  6. Lossy compression can be used for much higher compression in cases where it is not necessary to exactly preserve the original image.
  7. The CHECKSUM keywords are automatically updated to help verify the integrity of the files.
  8. Software that supports the tiled image compression technique can directly read and write the FITS images in their compressed form.

[ascl:1906.003] FREDDA: A fast, real-time engine for de-dispersing amplitudes

FREDDA detects Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in power data. It is optimized for use at ASKAP, namely GHz frequencies with 10s of beams, 100s of channels and millisecond integration times. The code is written in CUDA for NVIDIA Graphics Processing Units.

[ascl:1610.014] Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

[ascl:1211.002] FreeEOS: Equation of State for stellar interiors calculations

FreeEOS is a Fortran library for rapidly calculating the equation of state using an efficient free-energy minimization technique that is suitable for physical conditions in stellar interiors. Converged FreeEOS solutions can be reliably determined for the first time for physical conditions occurring in stellar models with masses between 0.1 M and the hydrogen-burning limit near 0.07 M and hot brown-dwarf models just below that limit. However, an initial survey of results for those conditions showed EOS discontinuities (plasma phase transitions) and other problems which will need to be addressed in future work by adjusting the interaction radii characterizing the pressure ionization used for the FreeEOS calculations.

[ascl:1508.004] FRELLED: FITS Realtime Explorer of Low Latency in Every Dimension

FRELLED (FITS Realtime Explorer of Low Latency in Every Dimension) creates 3D images in real time from 3D FITS files and is written in Python for the 3D graphics suite Blender. Users can interactively generate masks around regions of arbitrary geometry and use them to catalog sources, hide regions, and perform basic analysis (e.g., image statistics within the selected region, generate contour plots, query NED and the SDSS). World coordinates are supported and multi-volume rendering is possible. FRELLED is designed for viewing HI data cubes and provides a number of tasks to commonly-used MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) tasks (e.g. mbspect); however, many of its features are suitable for any type of data set. It also includes an n-body particle viewer with the ability to display 3D vector information as well as the ability to render time series movies of multiple FITS files and setup simple turntable rotation movies for single files.

[ascl:1406.006] FROG: Time-series analysis

FROG performs time series analysis and display. It provides a simple user interface for astronomers wanting to do time-domain astrophysics but still offers the powerful features found in packages such as PERIOD (ascl:1406.005). FROG includes a number of tools for manipulation of time series. Among other things, the user can combine individual time series, detrend series (multiple methods) and perform basic arithmetic functions. The data can also be exported directly into the TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010) application for further manipulation if needed.

[ascl:1506.006] fsclean: Faraday Synthesis CLEAN imager

Fsclean produces 3D Faraday spectra using the Faraday synthesis method, transforming directly from multi-frequency visibility data to the Faraday depth-sky plane space. Deconvolution is accomplished using the CLEAN algorithm, and the package includes Clark and Högbom style CLEAN algorithms. Fsclean reads in MeasurementSet visibility data and produces HDF5 formatted images; it handles images and data of arbitrary size, using scratch HDF5 files as buffers for data that is not being immediately processed, and is limited only by available disk space.

[ascl:1710.012] FSFE: Fake Spectra Flux Extractor

The fake spectra flux extractor generates simulated quasar absorption spectra from a particle or adaptive mesh-based hydrodynamic simulation. It is implemented as a python module. It can produce both hydrogen and metal line spectra, if the simulation includes metals. The cloudy table for metal ionization fractions is included. Unlike earlier spectral generation codes, it produces absorption from each particle close to the sight-line individually, rather than first producing an average density in each spectral pixel, thus substantially preserving more of the small-scale velocity structure of the gas. The code supports both Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO.

[ascl:1010.043] FSPS: Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis

FSPS is a flexible SPS package that allows the user to compute simple stellar populations (SSPs) for a range of IMFs and metallicities, and for a variety of assumptions regarding the morphology of the horizontal branch, the blue straggler population, the post--AGB phase, and the location in the HR diagram of the TP-AGB phase. From these SSPs the user may then generate composite stellar populations (CSPs) for a variety of star formation histories (SFHs) and dust attenuation prescriptions. Outputs include the "observed" spectra and magnitudes of the SSPs and CSPs at arbitrary redshift. In addition to these fortran routines, several IDL routines are provided that allow easy manipulation of the output. FSPS was designed with the intention that the user would make full use of the provided fortran routines. However, the full FSPS package is quite large, and requires some time for the user to become familiar with all of the options and syntax. Some users may only need SSPs for a range of metallicities and IMFs. For such users, standard SSP sets for several IMFs, evolutionary tracks, and spectral libraries are available here.

[ascl:1711.003] FTbg: Background removal using Fourier Transform

FTbg performs Fourier transforms on FITS images and separates low- and high-spatial frequency components by a user-specified cut. Both components are then inverse Fourier transformed back to image domain. FTbg can remove large-scale background/foreground emission in many astrophysical applications. FTbg has been designed to identify and remove Galactic background emission in Herschel/Hi-GAL continuum images, but it is applicable to any other (e.g., Planck) images when background/foreground emission is a concern.

[ascl:9912.002] FTOOLS: A general package of software to manipulate FITS files

FTOOLS, a highly modular collection of utilities for processing and analyzing data in the FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) format, has been developed in support of the HEASARC (High Energy Astrophysics Research Archive Center) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The FTOOLS package contains many utility programs which perform modular tasks on any FITS image or table, as well as higher-level analysis programs designed specifically for data from current and past high energy astrophysics missions. The utility programs for FITS tables are especially rich and powerful, and provide functions for presentation of file contents, extraction of specific rows or columns, appending or merging tables, binning values in a column or selecting subsets of rows based on a boolean expression. Individual FTOOLS programs can easily be chained together in scripts to achieve more complex operations such as the generation and displaying of spectra or light curves. FTOOLS development began in 1991 and has produced the main set of data analysis software for the current ASCA and RXTE space missions and for other archival sets of X-ray and gamma-ray data. The FTOOLS software package is supported on most UNIX platforms and on Windows machines. The user interface is controlled by standard parameter files that are very similar to those used by IRAF. The package is self documenting through a stand alone help task called fhelp. Software is written in ANSI C and FORTRAN to provide portability across most computer systems. The data format dependencies between hardware platforms are isolated through the FITSIO library package.

[ascl:1112.002] Funtools: FITS Users Need Tools

Funtools is a "minimal buy-in" FITS library and utility package developed at the the High Energy Astrophysics Division of SAO. The Funtools library provides simplified access to a wide array of file types: standard astronomical FITS images and binary tables, raw arrays and binary event lists, and even tables of ASCII column data. A sophisticated region filtering library (compatible with ds9) filters images and tables using boolean operations between geometric shapes, support world coordinates, etc. Funtools also supports advanced capabilities such as optimized data searching using index files.

Because Funtools consists of a library and a set of user programs, it is most appropriately built from source. Funtools has been ported to Solaris, Linux, LinuxPPC, SGI, Alpha OSF1, Mac OSX (darwin) and Windows 98/NT/2000/XP. Once the source code tar file is retrieved, Funtools can be built and installed easily using standard commands.

[ascl:1205.005] Fv: Interactive FITS file editor

Fv is an easy-to-use graphical program for viewing and editing any FITS format image or table. The Fv software is small, completely self-contained and runs on Windows PCs, most Unix platforms and Mac OS-X. Fv also provides a portal into the Hera data analysis service from the HEASARC.

[ascl:1010.015] Fyris Alpha: Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

Fyris Alpha is a high resolution, shock capturing, multi-phase, up-wind Godunov method hydrodynamics code that includes a variable equation of state and optional microphysics such as cooling, gravity and multiple tracer variables. The code has been designed and developed for use primarily in astrophysical applications, such as galactic and interstellar bubbles, hypersonic shocks, and a range of jet phenomena. Fyris Alpha boasts both higher performance and more detailed microphysics than its predecessors, with the aim of producing output that is closer to the observational domain, such as emission line fluxes, and eventually, detailed spectral synthesis. Fyris Alpha is approximately 75,000 lines of C code; it encapsulates the split sweep semi-lagrangian remap PPM method used by ppmlr (in turn developed from VH1, Blondin et al. 1998) but with an improved Riemann solver, which is derived from the exact solver of Gottlieb and Groth (1988), a significantly faster solution than previous solvers. It has a number of optimisations that have improved the speed so that additional calculations neeed for multi-phase simulations become practical.

[ascl:1801.011] GABE: Grid And Bubble Evolver

GABE (Grid And Bubble Evolver) evolves scalar fields (as well as other purposes) on an expanding background for non-canonical and non-linear classical field theory. GABE is based on the Runge-Kutta method.

[ascl:0003.001] GADGET-2: A Code for Cosmological Simulations of Structure Formation

The cosmological simulation code GADGET-2, a new massively parallel TreeSPH code, is capable of following a collisionless fluid with the N-body method, and an ideal gas by means of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The implementation of SPH manifestly conserves energy and entropy in regions free of dissipation, while allowing for fully adaptive smoothing lengths. Gravitational forces are computed with a hierarchical multipole expansion, which can optionally be applied in the form of a TreePM algorithm, where only short-range forces are computed with the `tree'-method while long-range forces are determined with Fourier techniques. Time integration is based on a quasi-symplectic scheme where long-range and short-range forces can be integrated with different timesteps. Individual and adaptive short-range timesteps may also be employed. The domain decomposition used in the parallelisation algorithm is based on a space-filling curve, resulting in high flexibility and tree force errors that do not depend on the way the domains are cut. The code is efficient in terms of memory consumption and required communication bandwidth. It has been used to compute the first cosmological N-body simulation with more than 10^10 dark matter particles, reaching a homogeneous spatial dynamic range of 10^5 per dimension in a 3D box. It has also been used to carry out very large cosmological SPH simulations that account for radiative cooling and star formation, reaching total particle numbers of more than 250 million. GADGET-2 is publicly released to the research community.

[ascl:1108.005] Gaepsi: Gadget Visualization Toolkit

Gaepsi is a PYTHON extension for visualizing cosmology simulations produced by Gadget. Visualization is the most important facet of Gaepsi, but it also allows data analysis on GADGET simulations with its growing number of physics related subroutines and constants. Unlike mesh based scheme, SPH simulations are directly visible in the sense that a splatting process is required to produce raster images from the simulations. Gaepsi produces images of 2-dimensional line-of-sight projections of the simulation. Scalar fields and vector fields are both supported.

Besides the traditional way of slicing a simulation, Gaepsi also has built-in support of 'Survey-like' domain transformation proposed by Carlson & White. An improved implementation is used in Gaepsi. Gaepsi both implements an interactive shell for plotting and exposes its API for batch processing. When complied with OpenMP, Gaepsi automatically takes the advantage of the multi-core computers. In interactive mode, Gaepsi is capable of producing images of size up to 32000 x 32000 pixels. The user can zoom, pan and rotate the field with a command in on the finger tip. The interactive mode takes full advantages of matplotlib's rich annotating, labeling and image composition facilities. There are also built-in commands to add objects that are commonly used in cosmology simulations to the figures.

[ascl:1403.024] GAIA: Graphical Astronomy and Image Analysis Tool

GAIA is an image and data-cube display and analysis tool for astronomy. It provides the usual facilities of image display tools, plus more astronomically useful ones such as aperture and optimal photometry, contouring, source detection, surface photometry, arbitrary region analysis, celestial coordinate readout, calibration and modification, grid overlays, blink comparison, defect patching and the ability to query on-line catalogues and image servers. It can also display slices from data-cubes, extract and visualize spectra as well as perform full 3D rendering. GAIA uses the Starlink software environment (ascl:1110.012) and is derived from the ESO SkyCat tool (ascl:1109.019).

[ascl:1707.006] Gala: Galactic astronomy and gravitational dynamics

Gala is a Python package (and Astropy affiliated package) for Galactic astronomy and gravitational dynamics. The bulk of the package centers around implementations of gravitational potentials, numerical integration, nonlinear dynamics, and astronomical velocity transformations (i.e. proper motions). Gala uses the Astropy units and coordinates subpackages extensively to provide a clean, pythonic interface to these features but does any heavy-lifting in C and Cython for speed.

[ascl:1302.011] GALA: Stellar atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances

GALA is a freely distributed Fortran code to derive the atmospheric parameters (temperature, gravity, microturbulent velocity and overall metallicity) and abundances for individual species of stellar spectra using the classical method based on the equivalent widths of metallic lines. The abundances of individual spectral lines are derived by using the WIDTH9 code developed by R. L. Kurucz. GALA is designed to obtain the best model atmosphere, by optimizing temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity and metallicity, after rejecting the discrepant lines. Finally, it computes accurate internal errors for each atmospheric parameter and abundance. The code obtains chemical abundances and atmospheric parameters for large stellar samples quickly, thus making GALA an useful tool in the epoch of the multi-object spectrographs and large surveys.

[ascl:1109.011] GalactICS: Galaxy Model Building Package

GalactICS generates N-body realizations of axisymmetric galaxy models consisting of disk, bulge and halo. Some of the code is in Fortran 77, using lines longer than 72 characters in some cases. The -e flag in the makefile allow for this for a Solaris f77 compiler. Other programs are written in C. Again, the linking between these routines works on Solaris systems, but may need to be adjusted for other architectures. We have found that linking using f77 instead of ld will often automatically load the appropriate libraries.

The graphics output by some of the programs (dbh, plotforce, diskdf, plothalo) uses the PGPLOT library. Alternatively, remove all calls to routines with names starting with "PG", as well as the -lpgplot flag in the Makefile, and the programs should still run fine.

[ascl:1108.004] Galacticus: A Semi-Analytic Model of Galaxy Formation

Galacticus is designed to solve the physics involved in the formation of galaxies within the current standard cosmological framework. It is of a type of model known as “semi-analytic” in which the numerous complex non-linear physics involved are solved using a combination of analytic approximations and empirical calibrations from more detailed, numerical solutions. Models of this type aim to begin with the initial state of the Universe (specified shortly after the Big Bang) and apply physical principles to determine the properties of galaxies in the Universe at later times, including the present day. Typical properties computed include the mass of stars and gas in each galaxy, broad structural properties (e.g. radii, rotation speeds, geometrical shape etc.), dark matter and black hole contents, and observable quantities such as luminosities, chemical composition etc.

[ascl:1303.018] Galactus: Modeling and fitting of galaxies from neutral hydrogen (HI) cubes

Galactus, written in python, is an astronomical software tool for the modeling and fitting of galaxies from neutral hydrogen (HI) cubes. Galactus uses a uniform medium to generate a cube. Galactus can perform the full-radiative transfer for the HI, so can model self-absorption in the galaxy.

[ascl:1408.011] GALAPAGOS-C: Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas

GALAPAGOS-C is a C implementation of the IDL code GALAPAGOS (ascl:1203.002). It processes a complete set of survey images through automation of source detection via SExtractor (ascl:1010.064), postage stamp cutting, object mask preparation, sky background estimation and complex two-dimensional light profile Sérsic modelling via GALFIT (ascl:1104.010). GALAPAGOS-C uses MPI-parallelization, thus allowing quick processing of large data sets. The code can fit multiple Sérsic profiles to each galaxy, each representing distinct galaxy components (e.g. bulge, disc, bar), and optionally can fit asymmetric Fourier mode distortions.

[ascl:1203.002] GALAPAGOS: Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor

GALAPAGOS, Galaxy Analysis over Large Areas: Parameter Assessment by GALFITting Objects from SExtractor (ascl:1010.064), automates source detection, two-dimensional light-profile Sersic modelling and catalogue compilation in large survey applications. Based on a single setup, GALAPAGOS can process a complete set of survey images. It detects sources in the data, estimates a local sky background, cuts postage stamp images for all sources, prepares object masks, performs Sersic fitting including neighbours and compiles all objects in a final output catalogue. For the initial source detection GALAPAGOS applies SExtractor, while GALFIT (ascl:1104.010) is incorporated for modelling Sersic profiles. It measures the background sky involved in the Sersic fitting by means of a flux growth curve. GALAPAGOS determines postage stamp sizes based on SExtractor shape parameters. In order to obtain precise model parameters GALAPAGOS incorporates a complex sorting mechanism and makes use of multiplexing capabilities. It combines SExtractor and GALFIT data in a single output table. When incorporating information from overlapping tiles, GALAPAGOS automatically removes multiple entries from identical sources. GALAPAGOS is programmed in the Interactive Data Language, IDL. A C implementation of the software, GALAPAGOS-C (ascl:1408.011), is available.

[ascl:1710.022] galario: Gpu Accelerated Library for Analyzing Radio Interferometer Observations

The galario library exploits the computing power of modern graphic cards (GPUs) to accelerate the comparison of model predictions to radio interferometer observations. It speeds up the computation of the synthetic visibilities given a model image (or an axisymmetric brightness profile) and their comparison to the observations.

[ascl:1503.002] Galax2d: 2D isothermal Euler equations solver

Galax2d computes the 2D stationary solution of the isothermal Euler equations of gas dynamics in a rotating galaxy with a weak bar. The gravitational potential represents a weak bar and controls the flow. A damped Newton method solves the second-order upwind discretization of the equations for a steady-state solution, using a consistent linearization and a direct solver. The code can be applied as a tool for generating flow models if used on not too fine meshes, up to 256 by 256 cells for half a disk in polar coordinates.

[ascl:1104.005] GALAXEV: Evolutionary Stellar Population Synthesis Models

GALAXEV is a library of evolutionary stellar population synthesis models computed using the new isochrone synthesis code of Bruzual & Charlot (2003). This code allows one to computes the spectral evolution of stellar populations in wide ranges of ages and metallicities at a resolution of 3 Å across the whole wavelength range from 3200 Å to 9500 Å, and at lower resolution outside this range.

[ascl:1901.005] Galaxia_wrap: Galaxia wrapper for generating mock stellar surveys

Galaxia_wrap is a python wrap around the popular Galaxia tool (ascl:1101.007) for generating mock stellar surveys, such as a magnitude limited survey, using a built-in Galaxy model or directly from n-body data. It also offers n-body functionality and has been used to infer the age distribution of a specific stellar tracer population.

[ascl:1101.007] Galaxia: A Code to Generate a Synthetic Survey of the Milky Way

We present here a fast code for creating a synthetic survey of the Milky Way. Given one or more color-magnitude bounds, a survey size and geometry, the code returns a catalog of stars in accordance with a given model of the Milky Way. The model can be specified by a set of density distributions or as an N-body realization. We provide fast and efficient algorithms for sampling both types of models. As compared to earlier sampling schemes which generate stars at specified locations along a line of sight, our scheme can generate a continuous and smooth distribution of stars over any given volume. The code is quite general and flexible and can accept input in the form of a star formation rate, age metallicity relation, age velocity dispersion relation and analytic density distribution functions. Theoretical isochrones are then used to generate a catalog of stars and support is available for a wide range of photometric bands. As a concrete example we implement the Besancon Milky Way model for the disc. For the stellar halo we employ the simulated stellar halo N-body models of Bullock & Johnston (2005). In order to sample N-body models, we present a scheme that disperses the stars spawned by an N-body particle, in such a way that the phase space density of the spawned stars is consistent with that of the N-body particles. The code is ideally suited to generating synthetic data sets that mimic near future wide area surveys such as GAIA, LSST and HERMES. As an application we study the prospect of identifying structures in the stellar halo with a simulated GAIA survey.

[ascl:1904.002] GALAXY: N-body simulation software for isolated, collisionless stellar systems

GALAXY evolves (almost) isolated, collisionless stellar systems, both disk-like and ellipsoidal. In addition to the N-body code galaxy, which offers eleven different methods to compute the gravitational accelerations, the package also includes sophisticated set-up and analysis software. While not as versatile as tree codes, for certain restricted applications the particle-mesh methods in GALAXY are 50 to 200 times faster than a widely-used tree code. After reading in data providing the initial positions, velocities, and (optionally) masses of the particles, GALAXY compute the gravitational accelerations acting on each particle and integrates forward the velocities and positions of the particles for a short time step, repeating these two steps as desired. Intermediate results can be saved, as can the final moment in a state from which the integration could be resumed. Particles can have individual masses and their motion can be integrated using a range of time steps for greater efficiency; message-passing-interface (MPI) calls are available to enable GALAXY's use on parallel machines with high efficiency.

[ascl:1312.010] GalaxyCount: Galaxy counts and variance calculator

GalaxyCount calculates the number and standard deviation of galaxies in a magnitude limited observation of a given area. The methods to calculate both the number and standard deviation may be selected from different options. Variances may be computed for circular, elliptical and rectangular window functions.

[ascl:1702.006] GalaxyGAN: Generative Adversarial Networks for recovery of galaxy features

GalaxyGAN uses Generative Adversarial Networks to reliably recover features in images of galaxies. The package uses machine learning to train on higher quality data and learns to recover detailed features such as galaxy morphology by effectively building priors. This method opens up the possibility of recovering more information from existing and future imaging data.

[ascl:1812.009] galclassify: Stellar classifications using a galactic population synthesis model

The stellar classification code galclassify is a stand-alone version of Galaxia (ascl:1101.007). It classifies and generates a synthetic population for each star using input containing observables in a fixed format rather than using a precomputed population over a large field. It is suitable for individual stellar classifications, but slow if you want to classify large samples of stars.

[ascl:1010.033] GALEV Evolutionary Synthesis Models

GALEV evolutionary synthesis models describe the evolution of stellar populations in general, of star clusters as well as of galaxies, both in terms of resolved stellar populations and of integrated light properties over cosmological timescales of > 13 Gyr from the onset of star formation shortly after the Big Bang until today.

For galaxies, GALEV includes a simultaneous treatment of the chemical evolution of the gas and the spectral evolution of the stellar content, allowing for a chemically consistent treatment using input physics (stellar evolutionary tracks, stellar yields and model atmospheres) for a large range of metallicities and consistently account for the increasing initial abundances of successive stellar generations.

[ascl:1810.001] galfast: Milky Way mock catalog generator

galfast generates catalogs for arbitrary, user-supplied Milky Way models, including empirically derived ones. The built-in model set is based on fits to SDSS stellar observations over 8000 deg2 of the sky and includes a three-dimensional dust distribution map. Because of the capability to use empirically derived models, galfast typically produces closer matches to the actual observed counts and color-magnitude diagrams. In particular, galfast-generated catalogs are used to derive the stellar component of “Universe Model” catalogs used by the LSST Project. A key distinguishing characteristic of galfast is its speed. Galfast uses the GPU (with kernels written in NVIDIA C/C++ for CUDA) to offload compute intensive model sampling computations to the GPU, enabling the generation of realistic catalogs to full LSST depth in hours (instead of days or weeks), making it possible to study proposed science cases with high precision.

[ascl:1104.010] GALFIT: Detailed Structural Decomposition of Galaxy Images

GALFIT is a two-dimensional (2-D) fitting algorithm designed to extract structural components from galaxy images, with emphasis on closely modeling light profiles of spatially well-resolved, nearby galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. The algorithm improves on previous techniques in two areas: 1.) by being able to simultaneously fit a galaxy with an arbitrary number of components, and 2.) with optimization in computation speed, suited for working on large galaxy images. 2-D models such as the "Nuker'' law, the Sersic (de Vaucouleurs) profile, an exponential disk, and Gaussian or Moffat functions are used. The azimuthal shapes are generalized ellipses that can fit disky and boxy components. Many galaxies with complex isophotes, ellipticity changes, and position-angle twists can be modeled accurately in 2-D. When examined in detail, even simple-looking galaxies generally require at least three components to be modeled accurately rather than the one or two components more often employed. This is illustrated by way of seven case studies, which include regular and barred spiral galaxies, highly disky lenticular galaxies, and elliptical galaxies displaying various levels of complexities. A useful extension of this algorithm is to accurately extract nuclear point sources in galaxies.

[ascl:1510.005] GALFORM: Galactic modeling

GALFORM is a semi-analytic model for calculating the formation and evolution of galaxies in hierarchical clustering cosmologies. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm to follow the merging evolution of dark matter haloes with arbitrary mass resolution, it incorporates realistic descriptions of the density profiles of dark matter haloes and the gas they contain. It follows the chemical evolution of gas and stars, and the associated production of dust and includes a detailed calculation of the sizes of discs and spheroids.

[ascl:1408.008] GALIC: Galaxy initial conditions construction

GalIC (GALaxy Initial Conditions) is an implementation of an iterative method to construct steady state composite halo-disk-bulge galaxy models with prescribed density distribution and velocity anisotropy that can be used as initial conditions for N-body simulations. The code is parallelized for distributed memory based on MPI. While running, GalIC produces "snapshot files" that can be used as initial conditions files. GalIC supports the three file formats ('type1' format, the slightly improved 'type2' format, and an HDF5 format) of the GADGET (ascl:0003.001) code for its output snapshot files.

[ascl:1511.010] Galileon-Solver: N-body code

Galileon-Solver adds an extra force to PMCode (ascl:9909.001) using a modified Poisson equation to provide a non-linearly transformed density field, with the operations all performed in real space. The code's implicit spherical top-hat assumption only works over fairly long distance averaging scales, where the coarse-grained picture it relies on is a good approximation of reality; it uses discrete Fourier transforms and cyclic reduction in the usual way.

[ascl:1903.010] GalIMF: Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function

GalIMF (Galaxy-wide Initial Mass Function) computes the galaxy-wide initial stellar mass function by integrating over a whole galaxy, parameterized by star formation rate and metallicity. The generated stellar mass distribution depends on the galaxy-wide star formation rate (SFR, which is related to the total mass of a galalxy) and the galaxy-wide metallicity. The code can generate a galaxy-wide IMF (IGIMF) and can also generate all the stellar masses within a galaxy with optimal sampling (OSGIMF). To compute the IGIMF or the OSGIMF, the GalIMF module contains all local IMF properties (e.g. the dependence of the stellar IMF on the metallicity, on the density of the star-cluster forming molecular cloud cores), and this software module can, therefore, be also used to obtain only the stellar IMF with various prescriptions, or to investigate other features of the stellar population such as what is the most massive star that can be formed in a star cluster.

[ascl:1711.011] galkin: Milky Way rotation curve data handler

galkin is a compilation of kinematic measurements tracing the rotation curve of our Galaxy, together with a tool to treat the data. The compilation is optimized to Galactocentric radii between 3 and 20 kpc and includes the kinematics of gas, stars and masers in a total of 2780 measurements collected from almost four decades of literature. The user-friendly software provided selects, treats and retrieves the data of all source references considered. This tool is especially designed to facilitate the use of kinematic data in dynamical studies of the Milky Way with various applications ranging from dark matter constraints to tests of modified gravity.

[ascl:1903.005] Galmag: Computation of realistic galactic magnetic fields

Galmag computes galactic magnetic fields based on mean field dynamo theory. Written in Python, Galmag allows quick exploration of solutions to the mean field dynamo equation based on galaxy parameters specified by the user, such as the scale height profile and the galaxy rotation curves. The magnetic fields are solenoidal by construction and can be helical.

[ascl:1501.014] GalPaK 3D: Galaxy parameters and kinematics extraction from 3D data

GalPaK 3D extracts the intrinsic (i.e. deconvolved) galaxy parameters and kinematics from any 3-dimensional data. The algorithm uses a disk parametric model with 10 free parameters (which can also be fixed independently) and a MCMC approach with non-traditional sampling laws in order to efficiently probe the parameter space. More importantly, it uses the knowledge of the 3-dimensional spread-function to return the intrinsic galaxy properties and the intrinsic data-cube. The 3D spread-function class is flexible enough to handle any instrument.

GalPaK 3D can simultaneously constrain the kinematics and morphological parameters of (non-merging, i.e. regular) galaxies observed in non-optimal seeing conditions and can also be used on AO data or on high-quality, high-SNR data to look for non-axisymmetric structures in the residuals.

[ascl:1611.006] GalPot: Galaxy potential code

GalPot finds the gravitational potential associated with axisymmetric density profiles. The package includes code that performs transformations between commonly used coordinate systems for both positions and velocities (the class OmniCoords), and that integrates orbits in the potentials. GalPot is a stand-alone version of Walter Dehnen's GalaxyPotential C++ code taken from the falcON code in the NEMO Stellar Dynamics Toolbox (ascl:1010.051).

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