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[ascl:1602.014] k2photometry: Read, reduce and detrend K2 photometry

k2photometry reads, reduces and detrends K2 photometry and searches for transiting planets. MAST database pixel files are used as input; the output includes raw lightcurves, detrended lightcurves and a transit search can be performed as well. Stellar variability is not typically well-preserved but parameters can be tweaked to change that. The BLS algorithm used to detect periodic events is a Python implementation by Ruth Angus and Dan Foreman-Mackey (https://github.com/dfm/python-bls).

[ascl:1607.010] K2PS: K2 Planet search

K2PS is an Oxford K2 planet search pipeline. Written in Python, it searches for transit-like signals from the k2sc-detrended light curves.

[ascl:1605.012] K2SC: K2 Systematics Correction

K2SC (K2 Systematics Correction) models instrumental systematics and astrophysical variability in light curves from the K2 mission. It enables the user to remove both position-dependent systematics and time-dependent variability (e.g., for transit searches) or to remove systematics while preserving variability (for variability studies). K2SC automatically computes estimates of the period, amplitude and evolution timescale of the variability for periodic variables and can be run on ASCII and FITS light curve files. Written in Python, this pipeline requires NumPy, SciPy, MPI4Py, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and George (ascl:1511.015).

[ascl:1307.003] K3Match: Point matching in 3D space

K3Match is a C library with Python bindings for fast matching of points in 3D space. It uses an implementation of three dimensional binary trees to efficiently find matches between points in 3D space. Two lists of points are compared and match indices as well as distances are given. K3Match can find either the nearest neighbour or all matches within a given search distance in 3D Cartesian space or on the surface of the 2D unit sphere in standard spherical or celestial coordinates.

[ascl:1803.005] Kadenza: Kepler/K2 Raw Cadence Data Reader

Kadenza enables time-critical data analyses to be carried out using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. It enables users to convert Kepler's raw data files into user-friendly Target Pixel Files upon downlink from the spacecraft. The primary motivation for this tool is to enable the microlensing, supernova, and exoplanet communities to create quicklook lightcurves for transient events which require rapid follow-up.

[ascl:1607.013] Kālī: Time series data modeler

The fully parallelized and vectorized software package Kālī models time series data using various stochastic processes such as continuous-time ARMA (C-ARMA) processes and uses Bayesian Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) for inferencing a stochastic light curve. Kālī is written in c++ with Python language bindings for ease of use. Kālī is named jointly after the Hindu goddess of time, change, and power and also as an acronym for KArma LIbrary.

[ascl:2011.003] Kalkayotl: Inferring distances to stellar clusters from Gaia parallaxes

Kalkayotl obtains samples of the joint posterior distribution of cluster parameters and distances to the cluster stars from Gaia parallaxes using Bayesian inference. The code is designed to deal with the parallax spatial correlations of Gaia data, and can accommodate different values of parallax zero point and spatial correlation functions.

[ascl:1906.005] Kalman: Forecasts and interpolations for ALMA calibrator variability

Kalman models an inhomogeneous time series of measurements at different frequencies as noisy sampling from a finite mixture of Gaussian Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes to try to reproduce the variability of the fluxes and of the spectral indices of the quasars used as calibrators in the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA), assuming sensible parameters are provided to the model (obtained, for example, from maximum likelihood estimation). One routine in the Kalman Perl module calculates best forecast estimations based on a state space representation of the stochastic model using Kalman recursions, and another routine calculates the smoothed estimation (or interpolations) of the measurements and of the state space also using Kalman recursions. The code does not include optimization routines to calculate best fit parameters for the stochastic processes.

[ascl:1403.022] KAPPA: Kernel Applications Package

KAPPA comprising about 180 general-purpose commands for image processing, data visualization, and manipulation of the standard Starlink data format--the NDF. It works with Starlink's various specialized packages; in addition to the NDF, KAPPA can also process data in other formats by using the "on-the-fly" conversion scheme. Many commands can process data arrays of arbitrary dimension, and others work on both spectra and images. KAPPA operates from both the UNIX C-shell and the ICL command language. KAPPA uses the Starlink environment (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1502.008] KAPPA: Optically thin spectra synthesis for non-Maxwellian kappa-distributions

Based on the freely available CHIANTI (ascl:9911.004) database and software, KAPPA synthesizes line and continuum spectra from the optically thin spectra that arise from collisionally dominated astrophysical plasmas that are the result of non-Maxwellian κ-distributions detected in the solar transition region and flares. Ionization and recombination rates together with the ionization equilibria are provided for a range of κ values. Distribution-averaged collision strengths for excitation are obtained by an approximate method for all transitions in all ions available within CHIANTI; KAPPA also offers tools for calculating synthetic line and continuum intensities.

[ascl:1611.010] Kapteyn Package: Tools for developing astronomical applications

The Kapteyn Package provides tools for the development of astronomical applications with Python. It handles spatial and spectral coordinates, WCS projections and transformations between different sky systems; spectral translations (e.g., between frequencies and velocities) and mixed coordinates are also supported. Kapteyn offers versatile tools for writing small and dedicated applications for the inspection of FITS headers, the extraction and display of (FITS) data, interactive inspection of this data (color editing) and for the creation of plots with world coordinate information. It includes utilities for use with matplotlib such as obtaining coordinate information from plots, interactively modifiable colormaps and timer events (module mplutil); tools for parsing and interpreting coordinate information entered by the user (module positions); a function to search for gaussian components in a profile (module profiles); and a class for non-linear least squares fitting (module kmpfit).

[ascl:1102.018] Karma: Visualisation Test-Bed Toolkit

Karma is a toolkit for interprocess communications, authentication, encryption, graphics display, user interface and manipulating the Karma network data structure. It contains KarmaLib (the structured libraries and API) and a large number of modules (applications) to perform many standard tasks. A suite of visualisation tools are distributed with the library.

[ascl:1701.005] KAULAKYS: Inelastic collisions between hydrogen atoms and Rydberg atoms

KAULAKYS calculates cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic collisions between Rydberg atoms and hydrogen atoms according to the free electron model of Kaulakys (1986, 1991). It is written in IDL and requires the code MSWAVEF (ascl:1701.006) to calculate momentum-space wavefunctions. KAULAKYS can be easily adapted to collisions with perturbers other than hydrogen atoms by providing the appropriate scattering amplitudes.

[ascl:1701.010] kcorrect: Calculate K-corrections between observed and desired bandpasses

kcorrect fits very restricted spectral energy distribution models to galaxy photometry or spectra in the restframe UV, optical and near-infrared. The main purpose of the fits are for calculating K-corrections. The templates used for the fits may also be interpreted physically, since they are based on the Bruzual-Charlot stellar evolution synthesis codes. Thus, for each fit galaxy kcorrect can provide an estimate of the stellar mass-to-light ratio.

[ascl:1712.001] KDUtils: Kinematic Distance Utilities

The Kinematic Distance utilities (KDUtils) calculate kinematic distances and kinematic distance uncertainties. The package includes methods to calculate "traditional" kinematic distances as well as a Monte Carlo method to calculate kinematic distances and uncertainties.

[ascl:1702.007] KEPLER: General purpose 1D multizone hydrodynamics code

KEPLER is a general purpose stellar evolution/explosion code that incorporates implicit hydrodynamics and a detailed treatment of nuclear burning processes. It has been used to study the complete evolution of massive and supermassive stars, all major classes of supernovae, hydrostatic and explosive nucleosynthesis, and x- and gamma-ray bursts on neutron stars and white dwarfs.

[ascl:1706.012] KeplerSolver: Kepler equation solver

KeplerSolver solves Kepler's equation for arbitrary epoch and eccentricity, using continued fractions. It is written in C and its speed is nearly the same as the SWIFT routines, while achieving machine precision. It comes with a test program to demonstrate usage.

[ascl:1806.022] Keras: The Python Deep Learning library

Keras is a high-level neural networks API written in Python and capable of running on top of TensorFlow, CNTK, or Theano. It focuses on enabling fast experimentation.

[submitted] KERN

KERN is a bi-annually released set of radio astronomical software packages. It should contain most of the standard tools that a radio astronomer needs to work with radio telescope data. The goal of KERN to is to save time and frustration in setting up of scientific pipelines, and to assist in achieving scientific reproducibility.

[ascl:1708.021] KERTAP: Strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes

KERTAP computes the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles.

[ascl:1502.020] ketu: Exoplanet candidate search code

ketu, written in Python, searches K2 light curves for evidence of exoplanets; the code simultaneously fits for systematic effects caused by small (few-pixel) drifts in the telescope pointing and other spacecraft issues and the transit signals of interest. Though more computationally expensive than standard search algorithms, it can be efficiently implemented and used to discover transit signals.

[ascl:2011.027] kiauhoku: Stellar model grid interpolation

Kiauhoku interacts with, manipulates, and interpolates between stellar evolutionary tracks in a model grid. It was built for interacting with YREC models, but other stellar evolution model grids, including MIST, Dartmouth, and GARSTEC, are also available.

[ascl:1403.019] KINEMETRY: Analysis of 2D maps of kinematic moments of LOSVD

KINEMETRY, written in IDL, analyzes 2D maps of the moments of the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LOSVD). It generalizes the surface photometry to all moments of the LOSVD. It performs harmonic expansion of 2D maps of observed moments (surface brightness, velocity, velocity dispersion, h3, h4, etc.) along the best fitting ellipses (either fixed or free to change along the radii) to robustly quantify maps of the LOSVD moments, describe trends in structures, and detect morphological and kinematic sub-components.

[ascl:2008.001] kinesis: Kinematic modeling of clusters

Kinesis fits the internal kinematics of a star cluster with astrometry and (incomplete) radial velocity data of its members. In the most general model, the stars can be a mixture of background (contamination) and the cluster, for which the (3,3) velocity dispersion matrix and velocity gradient (i.e., dv_x/dx and dv_y/dx) are included. There are also simpler versions of the most general model and utilities to generate mock clusters and mock observations.

[ascl:2006.003] KinMS: Three-dimensional kinematic modeling of arbitrary gas distributions

The KinMS (KINematic Molecular Simulation) package simulates observations of arbitrary molecular/atomic cold gas distributions from interferometers and line observations from integral field units. This modeling tool is optimized for situations where one has analytic forms for e.g. the rotation curve and/or surface brightness profiles (and may want to fit the parameters of these parametric models). It can, however, also be used as a tilted-ring modelling code. The routines are flexible and have been used in various different applications, including investigating the kinematics of molecular gas in early-type galaxies and determining supermassive black-hole masses from CO interferometric observations. They are also useful for creating mock observations from hydrodynamic simulations, and input data-cubes for further simulation in, for example, CASA's (ascl:1107.013) sim_observe tool. Interactive Data Language (IDL) and Python versions of the code are available.

[ascl:1401.001] Kirin: N-body simulation library for GPUs

The use of graphics processing units offers an attractive alternative to specialized hardware, like GRAPE. The Kirin library mimics the behavior of the GRAPE hardware and uses the GPU to execute the force calculations. It is compatible with the GRAPE6 library; existing code that uses the GRAPE6 library can be recompiled and relinked to use the GPU equivalents of the GRAPE6 functions. All functions in the GRAPE6 library have an equivalent GPU implementation. Kirin can be used for direct N-body simulations as well as for treecodes; it can be run with shared-time steps or with block time-steps and allows non-softened potentials. As Kirin makes use of CUDA, it works only on NVIDIA GPUs.

[submitted] Kliko - The Scientific Compute Container Format

We present Kliko, a Docker based container specification for running one or multiple related compute jobs. The key concepts of Kliko is the encapsulation of data processing software into a container and the formalisation of the input, output and task parameters. Formalisation is realised by bundling a container with a Kliko file, which describes the IO and task parameters. This Kliko container can then be opened and run by a Kliko runner. The Kliko runner will parse the Kliko definition and gather the values for these parameters, for example by requesting user input or pre defined values in a script. Parameters can be various primitive types, for example float, int or the path to a file. This paper will also discuss the implementation of a support library named Kliko which can be used to create Kliko containers, parse Kliko definitions, chain Kliko containers in workflows using, for example, Luigi a workflow manager. The Kliko library can be used inside the container interact with the Kliko runner. Finally this paper will discuss two reference implementations based on Kliko: RODRIGUES, a web based Kliko container schedular and output visualiser specifically for astronomical data, and VerMeerKAT, a multi container workflow data reduction pipeline which is being used as a prototype pipeline for the commisioning of the MeerKAT radio telescope.

[ascl:2008.003] KLLR: Kernel Localized Linear Regression

KLLR (Kernel Localized Linear Regression) generates estimates of conditional statistics in terms of the local slope, normalization, and covariance. This method provides a more nuanced description of population statistics appropriate for very large samples with non-linear trends. The code uses a bootstrap re-sampling technique to estimate the uncertainties and also provides tools to seamlessly generate visualizations of the model parameters.

[ascl:1606.012] KMDWARFPARAM: Parameters estimator for K and M dwarf stars

KMDWARFPARAM estimates the physical parameters of a star with mass M < 0.8 M_sun given one or more observational constraints. The code runs a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo procedure to estimate the parameter values and their uncertainties.

[ascl:2004.010] kombine: Kernel-density-based parallel ensemble sampler

kombine is an ensemble sampler built for efficiently exploring multimodal distributions. By using estimates of ensemble’s instantaneous distribution as a proposal, it achieves very fast burnin, followed by sampling with very short autocorrelation times.

[ascl:1504.013] kozai: Hierarchical triple systems evolution

The kozai Python package evolves hierarchical triple systems in the secular approximation. As its name implies, the kozai package is useful for studying Kozai-Lidov oscillations. The kozai package can represent and evolve hierarchical triples using either the Delaunay orbital elements or the angular momentum and eccentricity vectors. kozai contains functions to calculate the period of Kozai-Lidov oscillations and the maximum eccentricity reached; it also contains a module to study octupole order effects by averaging over individual Kozai-Lidov oscillations.

[ascl:1807.027] kplr: Tools for working with Kepler data using Python

kplr provides a lightweight Pythonic interface to the catalog of planet candidates (Kepler Objects of Interest [KOIs]) in the NASA Exoplanet Archive and the data stored in the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). kplr automatically supports loading Kepler data using pyfits (ascl:1207.009) and supports two types of data: light curves and target pixel files.

[ascl:1609.003] Kranc: Cactus modules from Mathematica equations

Kranc turns a tensorial description of a time dependent partial differential equation into a module for the Cactus Computational Toolkit (ascl:1102.013). This Mathematica application takes a simple continuum description of a problem and generates highly efficient and portable code, and can be used both for rapid prototyping of evolution systems and for high performance supercomputing.

[ascl:1402.011] KROME: Chemistry package for astrophysical simulations

KROME, given a chemical network (in CSV format), automatically generates all the routines needed to solve the kinetics of the system modeled as a system of coupled Ordinary Differential Equations. It provides a large set of physical processes connected to chemistry, including photochemistry, cooling, heating, dust treatment, and reverse kinetics. KROME is flexible and can be used for a wide range of astrophysical simulations. The package contains a network for primordial chemistry, a small metal network appropriate for the modeling of low metallicities environments, a detailed network for the modeling of molecular clouds, and a network for planetary atmospheres as well as a framework for the modelling of the dust grain population.

[ascl:1505.004] KS Integration: Kelvin-Stokes integration

KS Intergration solves for mutual photometric effects produced by planets and spots allowing for analysis of planetary occultations of spots and spots regions. It proceeds by identifying integrable and non integrable arcs on the objects profiles and analytically calculates the solution exploiting the power of Kelvin-Stokes theorem. It provides the solution up to the second degree of the limb darkening law.

[ascl:1804.026] KSTAT: KD-tree Statistics Package

KSTAT calculates the 2 and 3-point correlation functions in discreet point data. These include the two-point correlation function in 2 and 3-dimensions, the anisotripic 2PCF decomposed in either sigma-pi or Kazin's dist. mu projection. The 3-point correlation function can also work in anisotropic coordinates. The code is based on kd-tree structures and is parallelized using a mixture of MPI and OpenMP.

[ascl:1807.028] ktransit: Exoplanet transit modeling tool in python

The routines in ktransit create and fit a transiting planet model. The underlying model is a Fortran implementation of the Mandel & Agol (2002) limb darkened transit model. The code calculates a full orbital model and eccentricity can be allowed to vary; radial velocity data can also be calculated via the model and included in the fit.

[ascl:1407.011] kungifu: Calibration and reduction of fiber-fed IFU astronomical spectroscopy

kungifu is a set of IDL software routines designed for the calibration and reduction of fiber-fed integral-field unit (IFU) astronomical spectroscopy. These routines can perform optimal extraction of IFU data and allow relative and absolute wavelength calibration to within a few hundredths of a pixel (for unbinned data) across 1200-2000 fibers. kungifu does nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction, even in the I band, and can rebin in wavelength. The Princeton IDLUTILS and IDLSPEC2D packages must be installed for kungifu to run.

[ascl:1507.004] L-PICOLA: Fast dark matter simulation code

L-PICOLA generates and evolves a set of initial conditions into a dark matter field and can include primordial non-Gaussianity in the simulation and simulate the past lightcone at run-time, with optional replication of the simulation volume. It is a fast, distributed-memory, planar-parallel code. L-PICOLA is extremely useful for both current and next generation large-scale structure surveys.

[ascl:1207.005] L.A.Cosmic: Laplacian Cosmic Ray Identification

Conventional algorithms for rejecting cosmic rays in single CCD exposures rely on the contrast between cosmic rays and their surroundings and may produce erroneous results if the point-spread function is smaller than the largest cosmic rays. This code uses a robust algorithm for cosmic-ray rejection, based on a variation of Laplacian edge detection. The algorithm identifies cosmic rays of arbitrary shapes and sizes by the sharpness of their edges and reliably discriminates between poorly sampled point sources and cosmic rays. Examples of its performance are given for spectroscopic and imaging data, including Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images, in the code paper.

[ascl:1601.011] LACEwING: LocAting Constituent mEmbers In Nearby Groups

LACEwING (LocAting Constituent mEmbers In Nearby Groups) uses the kinematics (positions and motions) of stars to determine if they are members of one of 10 nearby young moving groups or 4 nearby open clusters within 100 parsecs. It is written for Python 2.7 and depends upon Numpy, Scipy, and Astropy (ascl:1304.002) modules. LACEwING can be used as a stand-alone code or as a module in other code. Additional python programs are present in the repository for the purpose of recalibrating the code and producing other analyses, including a traceback analysis.

[ascl:2012.021] LALSuite: LIGO Scientific Collaboration Algorithm Library Suite

LALSuite contains numerous gravitational wave analysis libraries. Written primarily in C, the libraries include math and signal analysis packages such as for vector manipulation, FFT, statistics, time-domain filtering, and numerical and signal injection routines. The libraries also include date and time and datatype factory routines, in addition to general and support tools and a variety of Python packages. Also included are packages for gravitational waveform and noise generation, burst gravitational wave data analysis, inspiral and ringdown CBC gravitational wave data analysis, pulsar and continuous wave gravitational wave data analysis, and Bayesian inference data analysis. Various wrappers and other tools are also included.

[ascl:1604.003] LAMBDAR: Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R

LAMBDAR measures galaxy fluxes from an arbitrary FITS image, covering an arbitrary photometric wave-band, when provided all parameters needed to construct galactic apertures at the required locations for multi-band matched aperture galactic photometry. Through sophisticated matched aperture photometry, the package develops robust Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and accurately establishes the physical properties of galactic objects. LAMBDAR was based on a package detailed in Bourne et al. (2012) that determined galactic fluxes in low resolution Herschel images.

[ascl:1010.077] LAMDA: Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database

LAMDA provides users of radiative transfer codes with the basic atomic and molecular data needed for the excitation calculation. Line data of a number of astrophysically interesting species are summarized, including energy levels, statistical weights, Einstein A-coefficients and collisional rate coefficients. Available collisional data from quantum chemical calculations and experiments are in some cases extrapolated to higher energies. Currently the database contains atomic data for 3 species and molecular data for 28 different species. In addition, several isotopomers and deuterated versions are available. This database should form an important tool in analyzing observations from current and future infrared and (sub)millimetre telescopes. Databases such as these rely heavily on the efforts by the chemical physics community to provide the relevant atomic and molecular data. Further efforts in this direction are strongly encouraged so that the current extrapolations of collisional rate coefficients can be replaced by actual calculations in future releases.

RADEX, a computer program for performing statistical equilibrium calculations is made publicly available as part of the data base.

[ascl:1409.003] LANL*: Radiation belt drift shell modeling

LANL* calculates the magnetic drift invariant L*, used for modeling radiation belt dynamics and other space weather applications, six orders of magnitude (~ one million times) faster than convectional approaches that require global numerical field lines tracing and integration. It is based on a modern machine learning technique (feed-forward artificial neural network) by supervising a large data pool obtained from the IRBEM library, which is the traditional source for numerically calculating the L* values. The pool consists of about 100,000 samples randomly distributed within the magnetosphere (r: [1.03, 11.5] Re) and within a whole solar cycle from 1/1/1994 to 1/1/2005. There are seven LANL* models, each corresponding to its underlying magnetic field configuration that is used to create the data sample pool. This model has applications to real-time radiation belt forecasting, analysis of data sets involving tens of satellite-years of observations, and other problems in space weather.

[ascl:1703.001] Larch: X-ray Analysis for Synchrotron Applications using Python

Larch is an open-source library and toolkit written in Python for processing and analyzing X-ray spectroscopic data. The primary emphasis is on X-ray spectroscopic and scattering data collected at modern synchrotron sources. Larch provides a wide selection of general-purpose processing, analysis, and visualization tools for processing X-ray data; its related target application areas include X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps, quantitative X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), and X-ray standing waves and surface scattering. Larch provides a complete set of XAFS Analysis tools and has support for visualizing and analyzing XRF maps and spectra, and additional tools for X-ray spectral analysis, data handling, and general-purpose data modeling.

[ascl:1208.015] Lare3d: Lagrangian-Eulerian remap scheme for MHD

Lare3d is a Lagrangian-remap code for solving the non-linear MHD equations in three spatial dimensions.

[ascl:1806.021] LASR: Linear Algorithm for Significance Reduction

LASR removes stellar variability in the light curves of δ-Scuti and similar stars. It subtracts oscillations from a time series by minimizing their statistical significance in frequency space.

[ascl:2010.006] LaSSI: Large-Scale Structure Information

LaSSI produces forecasts for the LSST 3x2 point functions analysis, or the LSSTxCMB S4 and LSSTxSO 6x2 point functions analyses using a Fisher matrix. It computes the auto and cross correlations of galaxy number density, galaxy shear and CMB lensing convergence. The software includes the effect of Gaussian and outlier photo-z errors, shear multiplicative bias, linear galaxy bias, and extensions to ΛCDM.

[ascl:1911.015] LATTICEEASY: Lattice simulator for evolving interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe

LATTICEEASY creates lattice simulations of the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program can do runs with different parameters and new models can be easily introduced for evaluation. Simulations can be done in one, two, or three dimensions by resetting a single variable. Mathematica notebooks for plotting the output and a range of models are also available for download; a parallel processing version of LATTICEEASY called CLUSTEREASY (ascl:1911.016) is also available.

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