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Results 2401-2500 of 2450 (2411 ASCL, 39 submitted)

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[ascl:2101.005] Avocado: Photometric classification of astronomical transients and variables with biased spectroscopic samples

Avocado produces classifications of arbitrary astronomical transients and variable objects. It addresses the problem of biased spectroscopic samples by generating many lightcurves from each object in the original spectroscopic sample at a variety of redshifts and with many different observing conditions. The "augmented" samples of lightcurves that are generated are much more representative of the full datasets than the original spectroscopic samples.

[ascl:2101.006] ptemcee: A parallel-tempered version of emcee

ptemcee, pronounced "tem-cee", is fork of Daniel Foreman-Mackey's emcee (ascl:1303.002) to implement parallel tempering more robustly. As far as possible, it is designed as a drop-in replacement for emcee. It is helpful for characterizing awkward, multi-modal probability distributions.

[ascl:2101.007] Mask galaxy: Machine learning pipeline for morphological segmentation of galaxies

Mask galaxy is an automatic machine learning pipeline for detection, segmentation and morphological classification of galaxies. The model is based on the Mask R-CNN Deep Learning architecture. This model of instance segmentation also performs image segmentation at the pixel level, and has shown a Mean Average Precision (mAP) of 0.93 in morphological classification of spiral or elliptical galaxies.

[ascl:2101.008] EphemMatch: Ephemeris matching of DR25 TCEs, KOIs, and EBs for false positive identification

EphemMatch reads in the period, epoch, positional, and other information of all the Kepler DR25 TCEs, as well as the cumulative KOI list, and lists of EBs from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Working Group (http://keplerebs.villanova.edu) as well as several catalogs of EBs known from ground-based surveys. The code then performs matching to identify two different objects that have a statistically identical period and epoch (within some tolerance) and perform logic to identify which is the real source (the parent) and which is a false positive due to contamination from the parent (a child).

[ascl:2101.009] cFS: core Flight System

cFS is a platform and project independent reusable software framework and set of reusable applications developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. There are three key aspects to the cFS architecture: a dynamic run-time environment, layered software, and a component based design, making it suitable for reuse on NASA flight projects and/or embedded software systems. This framework is used as the basis for the flight software for satellite data systems and instruments, but can also be used on other embedded systems. Modules of this package are used in NICER (Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer). The modules are available as separate downloads from SourceForge through the NASA cFS website.

[ascl:2101.010] apogee: Tools for APOGEE data

The apogee package works with SDSS-III APOGEE and SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 data. It reads various data products and applies cuts, works with APOGEE bitmasks, and plots APOGEE spectra. It can generate model spectra for APOGEE spectra, and APOGEE model grids can be used to fit spectra. apogee includes some simple stacking functions and implements the effective selection function for APOGEE.

[ascl:2101.011] Nigraha: Find and evaluate planet candidates from TESS light curves

Nigraha identifies and evaluates planet candidates from TESS light curves. Using a combination of high signal to noise ratio (SNR) shallow transits, supervised machine learning, and detailed vetting, the neural network-based pipeline identifies planet candidates missed by prior searches. The pipeline runs in four stages. It first performs period finding using the Transit Least Squares (TLS) package and runs sector by sector to build a per-sector catalog. It then transforms the flux values in .fits lightcurve files to global/local views and write out the output in .tfRecords files, builds a model on training data, and saves a checkpoint. Finally, it loads a previously saved model to generate predictions for new sectors. Nigraha provides helper scripts to generate candidates in new sectors, thus allowing others to perform their own analyses.

[ascl:2101.012] Octo-Tiger: HPX parallelized 3-D hydrodynamic code for stellar mergers

Octo-Tiger models mass transfer in binary systems using a Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement grid. It simulates the evolution of star systems based on a modified fast multipole method (FMM) on adaptive octrees. The code takes shock heating into account and uses the dual energy formalism with an ideal gas equation of state; it also conserves linear and angular momenta to machine precision. Octo-Tiger is implemented in C++ and is parallelized using the High Performance ParalleX (HPX) runtime system.

[ascl:2101.013] Curvit: Create light curves from UVIT data

Curvit produces light curves from UVIT (Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) data. It uses the events list from the official UVIT L2 pipeline (version 6.3 onwards) as input. The makecurves function of curvit automatically detects sources from events list and creates light curves. Curvit provides source coordinates only in the instrument coordinate system. If you already have the source coordinates, the curve function of curvit can be used to create light curves. The package has several parameters that can be set by the user; some of these parameters have default values. Curvit is available on PyPI.

[ascl:2101.014] PyXspec: Python interface to XSPEC spectral-fitting program

PyXspec is an object oriented Python interface to the XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) spectral-fitting program. It provides an alternative to Tcl, the sole scripting language for standard Xspec usage. With PyXspec loaded, a user can run Xspec with Python language scripts or interactively at a Python shell prompt; everything in PyXspec is accessible by importing the package xspec into your Python script. PyXspec can be utilized in a Python script or from the command line of the plain interactive Python interpreter. PyXspec does not implement its own command handler, so it is not intended to be run as the Python equivalent of a traditional interactive XSPEC session (which is really an enhanced interactive Tcl interpreter).

[ascl:2101.015] DarpanX: X-ray reflectivity of multilayer mirrors

DarpanX computes reflectivity and other specular optical functions of a multilayer or single layer mirror for different energy and angles as well as to fit the XRR measurements of the mirrors. It can be used as a standalone package. It has also been implemented as a local module for XSPEC (ascl:9910.005), which is accessible through and requires PyXspec (ascl:2101.014), and can accurately fit experimentally measured X-ray reflectivity data. DarpanX is implemented as a Python 3 module and an API is provided to access the underlying algorithms.

[ascl:2101.016] pyUPMASK: Unsupervised clustering method for stellar clusters

pyUPMASK is an unsupervised clustering method for stellar clusters that builds upon the original UPMASK (ascl:1504.001) package. Its general approach makes it applicable to analyses that deal with binary classes of any kind, as long as the fundamental hypotheses are met. The core of the algorithm follows the method developed in UPMASK but introducing several key enhancements that make it not only more general, they also improve its performance.

[ascl:2101.017] Eigentools: Tools for studying linear eigenvalue problems

Eigentools is a set of tools for studying linear eigenvalue problems. The underlying eigenproblems are solved using Dedalus (ascl:1603.015), which provides a domain-specific language for partial differential equations. Eigentools extends Dedalus's EigenvalueProblem object and provides automatic rejection of unresolved eigenvalues, simple plotting of specified eigenmodes and of spectra, and computation of $\epsilon$-pseudospectra for any Differential-Algebraic Equations with user-specifiable norms. It includes tools to find critical parameters for linear stability analysis and is able to project eigenmode onto 2- or 3-D domain for visualization. It can also output projected eigenmodes as Dedalus-formatted HDF5 file to be used as initial conditions for Initial Value Problems, and provides simple plotting of drift ratios (both ordinal and nearest) to evaluate tolerance for eigenvalue rejection.

[ascl:2101.018] stratsi: Stratified streaming instability

Stratsi calculates stratified and vertically-shearing streaming instabilities. It solves one- and two-fluid linearized equations, and, for two-fluid models, also provides the parameters and analytic vertical structure and solves for equilibrium horizontal velocity profiles. It offers utilities and various plotting options, including plots to compare one- and two-fluid results, viscous results to inviscid results, and results from two different stokes numbers or two different metallicities. stratsi requires Dedalus (ascl:1603.015) and Eigentools (ascl:2101.017).

[ascl:2102.001] spinOS: SPectroscopic and INterferometric Orbital Solution finder

spinOS calculates binary orbital elements. Given a set of radial velocity measurements of a spectroscopic binary and/or relative position measurement of an astrometric binary, spinOS fits an orbital model by minimizing a chi squared metric. These routines are neatly packaged in a graphical user interface, developed using tkinter, facilitating use. Minimization is achieved by default using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm from lmfit [ascl:1606.014]. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo option is available to sample the posterior probability distribution in order to estimate errors on the orbital elements.

[ascl:2102.002] MST: Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm for identifying large-scale filaments

MST (Minimum Spanning Tree) identifies velocity coherent large-scale filaments through ATLASGAL clumps. It can also isolate filaments embedded in a crowded position–position–velocity (PPV) space. One strength of this method is its repeatability compared to manual approaches.

[ascl:2102.003] Pixell: Rectangular pixel map manipulation and harmonic analysis library

Pixell loads, manipulates, and analyzes maps stored in rectangular pixelization. It is mainly targeted for use with maps of the sky (e.g., CMB intensity and polarization maps, stacks of 21 cm intensity maps, binned galaxy positions or shear) in cylindrical projection, but its core functionality is more general. It extends numpy's ndarray to an ndmap class that associates a World Coordinate System (WCS) with a numpy array. It includes tools for Fourier transforms (through numpy or pyfft) and spherical harmonic transforms (through libsharp2 (ascl:1402.033)) of such maps and tools for visualization (through the Python Image Library).

[ascl:2102.004] ThumbStack: Map and profile stacking pipeline

ThumbStack produces stacked maps and profiles, given catalogs of object positions and maps. It is designed for thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements. Based on Pixell (ascl:2102.003), it outputs 2D stacked maps and radial profiles for different filters (e.g., aperture photometry filters), as well as their covariances, estimated through several methods including bootstrap.

[ascl:2102.005] X-PSI: X-ray Pulse Simulation and Inference

X-PSI simulates rotationally-modified (pulsed) surface X-ray emission from neutron stars, taking into account relativistic effects on the emitted radiation. This can then be used to perform Bayesian statistical inference on real or simulated astronomical data sets. Model parameters of interest may include neutron star mass and radius (useful to constrain the properties of ultradense nuclear matter) or the system geometry and properties of the hot emitting surface-regions. To achieve this, X-PSI couples code for likelihood functionality (simulation) with existing open-source software for posterior sampling (inference).

[submitted] The NASA Goddard Exoplanet Modeling and Analysis Center

The Exoplanet Modeling and Analysis Center (EMAC) is a website which serves as a catalog, repository and integration platform for modeling and analysis resources focused on the study of exoplanet characteristics and environments. EMAC hosts user-submitted software ranging in category from planetary interior models to data visualization tools. Other features of EMAC include integrated web tools developed by the EMAC team in collaboration with the tools' original authors and video demonstrations of a growing number of hosted tools. EMAC aims to be a comprehensive repository for researchers to access a variety of exoplanet resources that can assist them in their work, and currently hosts a growing number of code bases, models, and tools. EMAC is a key project of the NASA GSFC Sellers Exoplanet Environments Collaboration (SEEC).

[ascl:2102.006] Lightbeam: Simulate light through weakly-guiding waveguides

Lightbeam simulates the 3D propagation of light through waveguides of arbitrary geometries. This code package is based off of the finite-differences beam propagation method, and employs a transverse adaptive mesh for extra computational efficiency. Also included are tools to simulate adaptive optics systems for use in conjunction with waveguides, useful in astronomical contexts for simulating coupling devices which transfer telescope light to the science instrument.

[ascl:2102.007] viscm: Colormaps analyzer and creator

viscm is a Python tool for visualizing and designing colormaps using colorspacious and matplotlib.

[ascl:2102.008] CMasher: Scientific colormaps for making accessible, informative plots

CMasher provides a curated collection of scientific colormaps that are perceptually uniform sequential using the viscm package (ascl:2102.007). Most of them are color-vision deficiency friendly; they cover a wide range of different color combinations to accommodate for most applications. The package provides several alternatives to commonly used colormaps, such as chroma and rainforest for jet, sunburst for hot, neutral for binary, and fusion and redshift for coolwarm.

[ascl:2102.009] EqTide: Equilibrium Tide calculations

EqTide calculates the evolution of 2 bodies experiencing tidal evolution according to the "equilibrium tide" framework's "constant-phase-lag" and "constant-time-lag" models. The input file contains a list of options that can be set, as well as output parameters that print to a file during an integration. The example input files provide a guide for the syntax and grammar of EqTide.

[ascl:2102.010] hardCORE: Exoplanet core radius fractions calculator

hardCORE calculates the minimum, maximum, and marginal core radius fractions (CRFmin, CRFmax, CRFmarg) for a solid exoplanet using only its mass and radius. Written in Python, the code is an efficient tool that is extremely fast to execute and perform inversions.

[ascl:2102.011] polgraw-allsky: All-sky almost-monochromatic gravitational-wave pipeline

polgraw-allsky searches for almost monochromatic gravitational wave signals. This pipeline searches for continuous gravitational wave signals in time-domain data using the F-statistic on data from a network of detectors. The software generates a parameter space grid, conducts a coherent search for candidate signals in narrowband time segments, and searches for coincidences among different time segments. The pipeline also estimates the false alarm probability of coincidences and follows up on interesting outliers.

[ascl:2102.012] MUSE-PSFR: PSF reconstruction for MUSE WFM-AO mode

MUSE-PSFR reconstructs a PSF for the MUSE WFM-AO mode using telemetry data from SPARTA. The algorithm conducts a Fourier analysis of the laser-assisted ground layer adaptive optics (GLAO) residual phase statistics and has been test in end-to-end simulations. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the required accuracy in terms of input parameters. MUSE-PSFR is capable of reconstructing the critical parameters of a PSF and can be used with MUSE 3D data by all MUSE users.

[ascl:2102.013] GalRotpy: Parametrize the rotation curve and gravitational potential of disk-like galaxies

GalRotpy models the dynamical mass of disk-like galaxies and makes a parametric fit of the rotation curve by means of the composed gravitational potential of the galaxy. It can be used to check the presence of an assumed mass type component in a observed rotation curve, to determine quantitatively the main mass contribution in a galaxy by means of the mass ratios of a given set of five potentials, and to bound the contribution of each mass component given its gravitational potential parameters.

[ascl:2102.014] nway: Bayesian cross-matching of astronomical catalogs

nway is a source cross-matching tool for arbitrarily many astronomical catalogs. It features Bayesian match probabilities based on astronomical sky coordinates (RA, DEC), works with arbitrarily many catalogs, and can handle varying errors. nway can also incorporate additional prior information, such as the magnitude or color distributions of the sources to match, and works accurately and fast in small areas and all-sky catalogs.

[ascl:2102.015] ForwardDiff: Forward mode automatic differentiation for Julia

ForwardDiff implements methods to take derivatives, gradients, Jacobians, Hessians, and higher-order derivatives of native Julia functions (or any callable object, really) using forward mode automatic differentiation (AD).While performance can vary depending on the functions you evaluate, the algorithms implemented by ForwardDiff generally outperform non-AD algorithms in both speed and accuracy.

[ascl:2102.016] OPUS: Interoperable access to analysis and simulation codes

OPUS (Observatoire de Paris UWS System) provides interoperable access to analysis and simulation codes on local machines or work clusters. This job control system was developed using the micro-framework bottle.py, and executes jobs asynchronously to better manage jobs with a long execution duration. The software follows the proposed IVOA Provenance Data Model to capture and expose the provenance information of jobs and results.

[ascl:2102.017] mirkwood: SED modeling using machine learning

mirkwood uses supervised machine learning to model non-linearly mapping galaxy fluxes to their properties. Multiple models are stacked to mitigate poor performance by any individual model in a given region of the parameter space. The code accounts for uncertainties arising both from intrinsic noise in observations and from finite training data and incorrect modeling assumptions, and provides highly accurate physical properties from observations of galaxies as compared to traditional SED fitting.

[ascl:2102.018] DaMaSCUS-SUN: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings - Sun Edition

DaMaSCUS-SUN is a Monte Carlo tool simulating the process of solar reflection of dark matter (DM) particles. It provides precise estimates of the DM particle flux reflected by the Sun and passing through a direct detection experiment on Earth. One application is to compute exclusion limits for low DM masses based on nuclear and electron recoil experiments.

[ascl:2102.019] HUAYNO: Hierarchically split-Up AstrophYsical N-body sOlver N-body code

HUAYNO implements integrators derived from second order Hamiltonian splitting for N-body dynamics. This integration scheme conserves energy and momentum with little or no systematic drift. The code uses an explicit but approximate formula for the time symmetrization that is compatible with the use of individual time steps, making an iterative scheme unnecessary. HUAYNO is available as part of the AMUSE package (ascl:1107.007).

[ascl:2102.020] MOSAIC: Multipole operator generator for Fast Multipole Method operators

MOSAIC (Multipole Operators in Symbols, Automatically Improved and Condensed) automatically produces, verifies, and optimizes computer code for Fast Multipole Method (FMM) operators. It is based on a symbolic algebra library, and can produce code for any expansion order and be extended to use any basis or kernel function. The code applies algebraic modifications to reduce the number of floating-point operations and can symbolically verify correctness.

[ascl:2102.021] lensingGW: Lensing of gravitational waves

lensingGW simulates lensed gravitational waves in ground-based interferometers from arbitrary compact binaries and lens models. Its algorithm resolves strongly lensed images and microimages simultaneously, such as the images resulting from hundreds of microlenses embedded in galaxies and galaxy clusters. It is based on Lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012),

[ascl:2102.022] RASSINE: Normalizing 1D stellar spectra

RASSINE normalizes merged 1D spectra using the concept of convex hulls. The code uses six parameters that can be fine-tuned, and provides an interactive interface, including graphical feedback, for easily choosing the parameters. RASSINE can also provide a first guess for the parameters that are derived directly from the merged 1D spectrum based on previously performed calibrations.

[ascl:2102.023] Multi_CLASS: Cross-tracer angular power spectra of number counts using CLASS

Multi_CLASS modifies the Boltzmann code CLASS (ascl:1106.020) to compute of the cross-tracer angular power spectra of the number count fluctuations for two different tracers of the underlying dark matter density field. In other words, it generalizes the standard nCl output option of CLASS to the case of two different tracers, for example, two different galaxy populations with their own redshift distribution, and galaxy and magnification bias parameters, among others.

Multi_CLASS also includes an implementation of the effect of primordial non-Gaussianities of the local type, parametrized by the parameter f_NL (following the large-scale structure convention), on the effective bias of the tracers. There is also the possibility of having a tilted non-Gaussian correction, parametrized by n_NG, with a pivot scale determined by k_pivot_NG. The package includes galaxy redshift distributions for forthcoming galaxy surveys, with the ease of choosing between them (or an input file) from the parameters input file (e.g., multi_explanatory.ini). In addition, Multi_CLASS includes the possibility of using resolved gravitational wave events as a tracer.

[ascl:2102.024] Piff: PSFs In the Full FOV

Piff models the point-spread function (PSF) across multiple detectors in the full field of view (FOV). Models can be built in chip coordinates or in sky coordinates if needed to account for the effects of astrometric distortion. The software can fit in either real or Fourier space, and can identify and excise outlier stars that are poor exemplars of the PSF according to some metric.

[ascl:2102.025] binaryoffset: Detecting and correcting the binary offset effect in CCDs

binaryoffset identifies the binary offset effect in images from any detector. The easiest input to work with is a dark or bias image that is spatially flat. The code can also be run on images that are not spatially flat, assuming that there is some model of the signal on the CCD that can be used to produce a residual image.

[ascl:2102.026] extinction: Dust extinction laws

extinction is an implementation of fast interstellar dust extinction laws in Python. It contains Cython-optimized implementations of empirical dust extinction laws found in the literature. Flux values can be reddened or dereddened using included functions, and all extinction laws accept a unit keyword to change the interpretation of the wavelength array from Angstroms to inverse microns. Part of this code originated in the specutils package (ascl:1902.012).

[ascl:2102.027] PyFstat: Continuous gravitational-wave data analysis

PyFstat performs F-statistic-based continuous gravitational wave (CW) searches and other CW data analysis tasks. It is built on top of the LALSuite library (ascl:2012.021), making that library's functionality more accessible through a Python interface; it also provides MCMC-based followup of promising candidates from wide-parameter-space searches.

[ascl:2102.028] PyAutoFit: Classy probabilistic programming

PyAutoFit supports advanced statistical methods such as massively parallel non-linear search grid-searches, chaining together model-fits and sensitivity mapping. It is a Python-based probabilistic programming language which composes and fits models using a range of Bayesian inference libraries, such as emcee (ascl:1303.002) and dynesty (ascl:1809.013). It performs model composition and customization, outputting results, model-specific visualization and posterior analysis. Built for big-data analysis, results are output as a database which can be loaded after model-fitting is complete.

[ascl:2102.029] BALRoGO: Bayesian Astrometric Likelihood Recovery of Galactic Objects

BALRoGO (Bayesian Astrometric Likelihood Recovery of Galactic Objects) handles data from the Gaia space mission. It extracts galactic objects such as globular clusters and dwarf galaxies from data contaminated by interlopers using a combination of Bayesian and non-Bayesian approaches. It fits proper motion space, surface density, and the object center. It also provides confidence regions for the color-magnitude diagram and parallaxes.

[ascl:2102.030] GLEAM: Galaxy Line Emission and Absorption Modeling

GLEAM (Galaxy Line Emission and Absorption Modeling) fits Gaussian models to emission and absorption lines in large samples of 1D galaxy spectra. The code is tailored to work well without much human interaction on optical and infrared spectra in a wide range of instrument setups and signal-to-noise regimes. gleam will create a fits table with Gaussian line measurements, including central wavelength, width, height and amplitude, as well as estimates for the continuum under the line and the line flux, luminosity, equivalent width and velocity width. gleam will also, optionally, make plots of the spectrum with fitted lines overlaid.

[submitted] 21cmDeepLearning

Python codes to extract the underlying matter density map from a 21 cm intensity field, making use of a convolutional neural network (CNN) with the U-Net architecture. Implemented in Pytorch. The astrophysical parameters of the simulations can also be predicted with a secondary CNN. The simulations of matter density and 21 cm maps have been performed with the code 21cmFAST.

[submitted] hfs_fit: Atomic Emission Spectral Line Hyperfine Structure Fitting

Python codes for parameter optimisation in the analysis of emission line hyperfine structure. The code uses a simulated annealing algorithm to optimise the magnetic dipole interaction constants, electric quadrupole interaction constants, Voigt profile widths and the centre of gravity wavenumber for a given emission line profile.

[submitted] FLARE: Synthetic Fast Radio Burst Catalog Generator

FLARE, a parallel code written in Python, generates 100,000 Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) using the Monte Carlo method. The FRB population is diverse and includes sporadic FRBs, repeaters, and periodic repeaters. However, less than 200 FRBs have been detected to date, which makes understanding the FRB population difficult. To tackle this problem, FLARE uses a Monte Carlo method to generate 100,000 realistic FRBs, which can be analyzed later on for further research. It has the capability to simulate FRB distances (based on the observed FRB distance range), energies (based on the "flaring magnetar model" of FRBs), fluences, multi-wavelength counterparts (based on x-ray to radio fluence ratio of FRB 200428), and other properties. It analyzes the resulting synthetic FRB catalog and displays the distribution of their properties. It is fast (as a result of parallel code) and requires minimal human interaction. FLARE is, therefore, able to give a broad picture of the FRB population.

[submitted] U.S. Naval Observatory Ephemerides of the Largest Asteroids (USNO/AE98)

USNO/AE98 contains ephemerides for fifteen of the largest asteroids that The Astronomical Almanac has used since its 2000 edition. These ephemerides are based on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) planetary ephemeris DE405 and, thus, aligned to the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS). The data cover the period from 1799 November 16 (JD 2378450.5) through 2100 February 1 (JD 2488100.5). The internal uncertainty in the mean longitude at epoch, 1997 December 18, ranges from 0.05 arcseconds for 7 Iris through 0.22 arcseconds for 65 Cybele, and the uncertainty in the mean motion varies from 0.02 arcseconds per century for 4 Vesta to 0.14 arcseconds per century for 511 Davida.

The Astronomical Almanac has published ephemerides for 1 Ceres, 2 Pallas, 3 Juno, and 4 Vesta since its 1953 edition. Historically, these four asteroids have been observed more than any of the others. Ceres, Pallas, and Vesta deserve such attention because as they are the three most massive asteroids, the source of significant perturbations of the planets, the largest in linear size, and among the brightest main belt asteroids. Studying asteroids may provide clues to the origin and primordial composition of the solar system, data for modeling the chaotic dynamics of small solar system bodies, and assessments of potential collisions. Therefore, USNO/AE98 includes more than the traditional four asteroids.

The following criteria were used to select main belt asteroids for USNO/AE98:

Diameter greater than 300 km, presumably among the most massive asteroids
Excellent observing history and discovered before 1850
Largest in their taxonomic class
The massive asteroids included may be studied for their perturbing effects on the planets while those with detailed observing histories may be used to evaluate the accuracy limits of asteroid ephemerides. The fifteen asteroids that met at least one of these criteria are

1 Ceres (new mass determination)
2 Pallas (new mass determination)
3 Juno
4 Vesta (new mass determination)
6 Hebe
7 Iris
8 Flora
9 Metis
10 Hygiea
15 Eunomia
16 Psyche
52 Europa
65 Cybele
511 Davida
704 Interamnia
The refereed paper by Hilton (1999, Astron. J. 117, 1077) describes the USNO/AE98 asteroid ephemerides in detail. The associated USNO/AA Tech Note 1998-12 includes residual plots for all fifteen asteroids and a comparison between these ephemerides and those used in The Astronomical Almanac through 1999.

Software to compact, read, and interpolate the USNO/AE98 asteroid ephemerides is also available. It is written in C and designed to work with the C edition of the Naval Observatory Vector Astrometry Software (NOVAS). The programs could be used with tabular ephemerides of other asteroids as well. The associated README file provides the details of this system.

[submitted] synchrofit: python-based synchrotron spectral fitting

The synchrofit (synchrotron fitter) package implements a reduced dimensionality parameterisation of standard synchrotron spectrum models, and provides fitting routines applicable for active galactic nuclei and supernova remnants. The Python code includes the Jaffe-Parola model (JP), Kardashev-Pacholczyk model (KP), and continuous injection models (CI/KGJP) for both constant or Maxwell-Boltzmann magnetic field distributions. An adaptive maximum likelihood algorithm is invoked to fit these models to multi-frequency radio observations; the adaptive mesh is customisable for either optimal precision or computational efficiency. Functions are additionally provided to plot the fitted spectral model with its confidence interval, and to derive the spectral age of the synchrotron emitting particles.

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