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[submitted] pile-up: Monte Carlo simulations of star-disk torques on hot Jupiters

This gnuplot script generates a Monte Carlo simulation with a selectable number of randomized drawings (1000 by default, ~1min on a modern laptop). For each realization, the script calculates the torque acting on a hot Jupiter around a young, solar-type star as a function of the star-planet distance. The total torque on the planet is composed of the disk torque in the type II migration regime (that is, the planet is assumed to have opened up a gap in the disk) and of the stellar tidal torque. The model has four free parameters, which are drawn from a normal or lognormal distribution: (1) the disk's gas surface density at 1 astronomical unit, (2) the magnitude of tidal dissipation within the star, (3) the disk's alpha viscosity parameter, and (4) and the mean molecular weight of the gas in the disk midplane. For each realization, the total torque is screened for a distance at which it becomes zero. If present, then this distance would represent a tidal migration barrier to the planet. In other words, the planet would stop migrating. This location is added to a histogram on top of the main torque-over-distance panel and the realization is counted as one case that contributes to the overall survival rate of hot Jupiters. Finally, the script generates an output file (PDF by default) and prints the hot Jupiter survival rate for the assumed parameterization of the star-planet-disk system.

[submitted] SpS - Single-pulse Searcher

Searching for radio pulses emitted on millisecond timescales by celestial radio sources such as pulsars and fast radio bursts has been gaining increasing popularity in the last decade. The presence of human-made interference that mimics the behaviour of celestial radio pulses is a major challenge for such studies due to the highly imbalanced samples. Single-pulse Searcher (SpS) processes standard output from radio single-pulse searches with the aim to reduce the presence of radio interference and produce diagnostic plots useful to select good candidates. The different parts forming the software are collected into modules in order to allow modifications to specific search characteristics. LOTAAS Single-pulse Searcher (L-SpS) is an implementation of different features of the software (such as a machine-learning approach) developed for a particular study: the LOFAR Tied-Array All-Sky Survey (LOTAAS).

[ascl:1806.012] WDEC: White Dwarf Evolution Code

WDEC (White Dwarf Evolution Code), written in Fortran, offers a fast and fairly easy way to produce models of white dwarfs. The code evolves hot (~100,000 K) input models down to a chosen effective temperature by relaxing the models to be solutions of the equations of stellar structure. The code can also be used to obtain g-mode oscillation modes for the models.

[ascl:1806.011] P2DFFT: Parallelized technique for measuring galactic spiral arm pitch angles

P2DFFT is a parallelized version of 2DFFT (ascl:1608.015). It isolates and measures the spiral arm pitch angle of galaxies. The code allows direct input of FITS images, offers the option to output inverse Fourier transform FITS images, and generates idealized logarithmic spiral test images of a specified size that have 1 to 6 arms with pitch angles of -75 degrees to 75 degrees​​. Further, it can output Fourier amplitude versus inner radius and pitch angle versus inner radius for each Fourier component (m = 0 to m = 6), and calculates the Fourier amplitude weighted mean pitch angle across m = 1 to m = 6 versus inner radius.

[ascl:1806.010] SpaghettiLens: Web-based gravitational lens modeling tool

SpaghettiLens allows citizen scientists to model gravitational lenses collaboratively; the software should also be easily adaptable to any other, reasonably similar problem. It lets volunteers execute a computer intensive task that cannot be easily executed client side and relies on citizen scientists collaborating. SpaghettiLens makes survey data available to citizen scientists, manages the model configurations generated by the volunteers, stores the resulting model configuration, and delivers the actual model. A model can be shared and discussed with other volunteers and revised, and new child models can be created, resulting in a branching version tree of models that explore different possibilities. Scientists can choose a collection of models; discussion among volunteers and scientists prune the tree to determine which models will receive further analysis.

[ascl:1806.009] GLASS: Parallel, free-form gravitational lens modeling tool and framework

GLASS models strong gravitational lenses. It produces an ensemble of possible models that fit the observed input data and conform to certain constraints specified by the user. GLASS makes heavy use of the numerical routines provided by the numpy and scipy packages as well as the linear programming package GLPK. This latter package, and its Python interface, is provided with GLASS and installs automatically in the GLASS build directory.

[ascl:1806.008] gsf: galactic structure finder

gsf applies Gaussian Mixture Models in the stellar kinematic space of normalized angular momentum and binding energy on NIHAO high resolution galaxies to separate the stars into multiple components. The gsf analysis package assumes that the simulation snapshot has been pre-processed with a halo finder. It is based on pynbody (ascl:1305.002) and the scikit-learnpython package for Machine Learning; after loading, orienting, and transforming a simulation snapshot to physical units, it runs the clustering algorithm and performs the direct N-body gravity force using all the particles in the given halo.

[ascl:1806.007] PyAMOR: AMmOnia data Reduction

PyAMOR models spectra of low level ammonia transitions (between (J,K)=(1,1) and (5,5)) and derives parameters such as intrinsic linewidth, optical depth, and rotation temperature. For low S/N or low spectral resolution data, the code uses cross-correlation between a model and a regridded spectrum (e.g. 10 times smaller channel width) to find the velocity, then fixes it and runs the minimization process. For high S/N data, PyAMOR runs with the velocity as a free parameter.

[ascl:1806.006] QE: Quantum opEn-Source Package for Research in Electronic Structure, Simulation, and Optimization

Quantum ESPRESSO (opEn-Source Package for Research in Electronic Structure, Simulation, and Optimization) is an integrated suite of codes for electronic-structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It is based on density-functional theory, plane waves, and pseudopotentials. QE performs ground-state calculations such as self-consistent total energies, forces, stresses and Kohn-Sham orbitals, Car-Parrinello and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, and quantum transport such as ballistic transport, coherent transport from maximally localized Wannier functions, and Kubo-Greenwood electrical conductivity. It can also determine spectroscopic properties and examine time-dependent density functional perturbations and electronic excitations, and has a wide range of other functions.

[ascl:1806.005] Indri: Pulsar population synthesis toolset

Indri models the population of single (not in binary or hierarchical systems) neutron stars. Given a starting distribution of parameters (birth place, velocity, magnetic field, period), the code moves a set of stars through time (by evolving spin period and magnetic field) and space (flying inside Galactic potential). Upon completion of the evolution a set of observables (radio flux, position, dispersion measure or amplitude of gravitational wave and its geometrical orientation) is computed and can be compared with a radio survey such as the Parkes Multibeam Survey.

[ascl:1806.004] WiseView: Visualizing motion and variability of faint WISE sources

WiseView renders image blinks of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) coadds spanning a multi-year time baseline in a browser. The software allows for easy visual identification of motion and variability for sources far beyond the single-frame detection limit, a key threshold not surmounted by many studies. WiseView transparently gathers small image cutouts drawn from many terabytes of unWISE coadds, facilitating access to this large and unique dataset. Users need only input the coordinates of interest and can interactively tune parameters including the image stretch, colormap and blink rate. WiseView was developed in the context of the Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 citizen science project, and has enabled hundreds of brown dwarf candidate discoveries by citizen scientists and professional astronomers.

[submitted] stepped_luneburg: Python stacked-based ray tracing code to model a stepped Luneburg lens

The optical Luneburg lens has promising applications for low-cost, continuous all-sky monitoring to obtain transit light curves of bright, nearby stars. stepped_luneburg is a publicly available stacked-based ray tracing code written in Python to investigate the scattered light properties of a Luneburg lens approximated as a series of concentric shells with discrete refractive indices. The code implements a stack-based algorithm that tracks all reflected and refracted rays generated at each optical interface of the lens as described by Snell's law. The Luneburg lens model parameters, such as number of lens layers, the power-law that describes the refractive indices, the number of incident rays, and the initial direction of the incident wavefront can be altered to optimize lens performance. The stepped_luneburg module can be imported within the Python environment or used with scripting, and it is accompanied by two other modules, enc_int and int_map, that help the user to determine the resolving power of the lens and the strength of scattered light haloes for the purpose of quality assessment.

[ascl:1806.003] pyZELDA: Python code for Zernike wavefront sensors

pyZELDA analyzes data from Zernike wavefront sensors dedicated to high-contrast imaging applications. This modular software was originally designed to analyze data from the ZELDA wavefront sensor prototype installed in VLT/SPHERE; simple configuration files allow it to be extended to support several other instruments and testbeds. pyZELDA also includes simple simulation tools to measure the theoretical sensitivity of a sensor and to compare it to other sensors.

[submitted] isis_emcee: ISIS-based MCMC Hammer

ISIS_EMCEE is the implementation of Goodman & Weare's affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) ensemble sampler in the Interactive Spectral Interpretation System (ISIS; ascl:1302.002), based upon the parallel "simple stretch" method from the MCMC Hammer (emcee; ascl:1303.002).

[ascl:1806.002] BHDD: Primordial black hole binaries code

BHDD (BlackHolesDarkDress) simulates primordial black hole (PBH) binaries that are clothed in dark matter (DM) halos. The software uses N-body simulations and analytical estimates to follow the evolution of PBH binaries formed in the early Universe.

[ascl:1806.001] feets: feATURE eXTRACTOR FOR tIME sERIES

feets characterizes and analyzes light-curves from astronomical photometric databases for modelling, classification, data cleaning, outlier detection and data analysis. It uses machine learning algorithms to determine the numerical descriptors that characterize and distinguish the different variability classes of light-curves; these range from basic statistical measures such as the mean or standard deviation to complex time-series characteristics such as the autocorrelation function. The library is not restricted to the astronomical field and could also be applied to any kind of time series. This project is a derivative work of FATS (ascl:1711.017).

[submitted] gdr2_completeness

This packages has two main utilities:

[1] It can be used to query Gaia DR2 TAP services and divide the queries into sub-queries chunked into arbitrary healpix bins.

[2] Example queries are shown which download the starcount per healpix and gmag in arbitrary binning.
We provide methods that turn these downloaded data into easy to use arrays. By dividing the total starcount and starcounts with an applied cut (e.g. radial velocity measurement and good parallax) in 'internal' completeness can be calculated. We also provide an independent determination of the 'external' GDR2 completeness per healpix (level 6) and G magnitude bin (3 coarse bins: 8-12,12-15,15-18) inferred from a crossmatch with 2MASS data. By multiplying the 'internal' with the 'external' completeness map the overall completeness of a specific GDR2 sample can be aproximated. This is useful when data is compared to models thereof.

We provide jupyter notebooks that showcase both utilities and enable the user to easily construct the overall completeness for arbitrary samples of the GDR2 catalogue.

[ascl:1805.032] PyCCF: Python Cross Correlation Function for reverberation mapping studies

PyCCF emulates a Fortran program written by B. Peterson for use with reverberation mapping. The code cross correlates two light curves that are unevenly sampled using linear interpolation and measures the peak and centroid of the cross-correlation function. In addition, it is possible to run Monto Carlo iterations using flux randomization and random subset selection (RSS) to produce cross-correlation centroid distributions to estimate the uncertainties in the cross correlation results.

[ascl:1805.031] CubiCal: Suite for fast radio interferometric calibration

CubiCal implements several accelerated gain solvers which exploit complex optimization for fast radio interferometric gain calibration. The code can be used for both direction-independent and direction-dependent self-calibration. CubiCal is implemented in Python and Cython, and multiprocessing is fully supported.

[ascl:1805.030] PyCBC: Gravitational-wave data analysis toolkit

PyCBC analyzes data from gravitational-wave laser interferometer detectors, finds signals, and studies their parameters. It contains algorithms that can detect coalescing compact binaries and measure the astrophysical parameters of detected sources. PyCBC was used in the first direct detection of gravitational waves by LIGO and is used in the ongoing analysis of LIGO and Virgo data.

[ascl:1805.029] DeepMoon: Convolutional neural network trainer to identify moon craters

DeepMoon trains a convolutional neural net using data derived from a global digital elevation map (DEM) and catalog of craters to recognize craters on the Moon. The TensorFlow-based pipeline code is divided into three parts. The first generates a set images of the Moon randomly cropped from the DEM, with corresponding crater positions and radii. The second trains a convnet using this data, and the third validates the convnet's predictions.

[ascl:1805.028] SP_Ace: Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator

SP_Ace (Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator) estimates the stellar parameters Teff, log g, [M/H], and elemental abundances. It employs 1D stellar atmosphere models in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). The code is highly automated and suitable for analyzing the spectra of large spectroscopic surveys with low or medium spectral resolution (R = 2000-20 000). A web service for calculating these values with the software is also available.

[ascl:1805.027] MontePython 3: Parameter inference code for cosmology

MontePython 3 provides numerous ways to explore parameter space using Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling, including Metropolis-Hastings, Nested Sampling, Cosmo Hammer, and a Fisher sampling method. This improved version of the Monte Python (ascl:1307.002) parameter inference code for cosmology offers new ingredients that improve the performance of Metropolis-Hastings sampling, speeding up convergence and offering significant time improvement in difficult runs. Additional likelihoods and plotting options are available, as are post-processing algorithms such as Importance Sampling and Adding Derived Parameter.

[ascl:1805.026] PySE: Python Source Extractor for radio astronomical images

PySE finds and measures sources in radio telescope images. It is run with several options, such as the detection threshold (a multiple of the local noise), grid size, and the forced clean beam fit, followed by a list of input image files in standard FITS or CASA format. From these, PySe provides a list of found sources; information such as the calculated background image, source list in different formats (e.g. text, region files importable in DS9), and other data may be saved. PySe can be integrated into a pipeline; it was originally written as part of the LOFAR Transient Detection Pipeline (TraP, ascl:1412.011).

[ascl:1805.025] GLACiAR: GaLAxy survey Completeness AlgoRithm

GLACiAR (GaLAxy survey Completeness AlgoRithm) estimates the completeness and selection functions in galaxy surveys. Tailored for multiband imaging surveys aimed at searching for high-redshift galaxies through the Lyman Break technique, the code can nevertheless be applied broadly. GLACiAR generates artificial galaxies that follow Sérsic profiles with different indexes and with customizable size, redshift and spectral energy distribution properties, adds them to input images, and measures the recovery rate.

[ascl:1805.024] ASTROPOP: ASTROnomical Polarimetry and Photometry pipeline

AstroPoP reduces almost any CCD photometry and image polarimetry data. For photometry reduction, the code performs source finding, aperture and PSF photometry, astrometry calibration using different automated and non-automated methods and automated source identification and magnitude calibration based on online and local catalogs. For polarimetry, the code resolves linear and circular Stokes parameters produced by image beam splitter or polarizer polarimeters. In addition to the modular functions, ready-to-use pipelines based in configuration files and header keys are also provided with the code. AstroPOP was initially developed to reduce the IAGPOL polarimeter data installed at Observatório Pico dos Dias (Brazil).

[submitted] NFW distribution functions

Density, distribution function, quantile function and random generation for the 3D Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) profile. The novel aspect to this is the quantile function, which provides an analytic transform for generating random samples. Functionally identical codes are provided in R and Python.

[ascl:1805.023] PROM7: 1D modeler of solar filaments or prominences

PROM7 is an update of PROM4 (ascl:1306.004) and computes simple models of solar prominences and filaments using Partial Radiative Distribution (PRD). The models consist of plane-parallel slabs standing vertically above the solar surface. Each model is defined by 5 parameters: temperature, density, geometrical thickness, microturbulent velocity and height above the solar surface. It solves the equations of radiative transfer, statistical equilibrium, ionization and pressure equilibria, and computes electron and hydrogen level population and hydrogen line profiles. Moreover, the code treats calcium atom which is reduced to 3 ionization states (Ca I, Ca II, CA III). Ca II ion has 5 levels which are useful for computing 2 resonance lines (H and K) and infrared triplet (to 8500 A).

[ascl:1805.022] BCcodes: Bolometric Corrections and Synthetic Stellar Photometry

BCcodes computes bolometric corrections and synthetic colors in up to 5 filters for input values of the stellar parameters Teff, log(g), [Fe/H], E(B-V) and [alpha/Fe].

[ascl:1805.021] PampelMuse: Crowded-field 3D spectroscopy

PampelMuse analyzes integral-field spectroscopic observations of crowded stellar fields and provides several subroutines to perform the individual steps of the data analysis. All analysis steps assume that the IFS data has been properly reduced and that all the instrumental artifacts have been removed. PampelMuse is designed to correctly handle IFS data regardless of which instrument was used to observe the data. In addition to the actual data, the software also requires an estimate of the variances for the analysis; optionally, it can use a bad pixel mask. The analysis relies on the presence of a reference catalogue, containing coordinates and magnitudes of the stars in and around the observed field.

[ascl:1805.020] SWIFT: SPH With Inter-dependent Fine-grained Tasking

SWIFT runs cosmological simulations on peta-scale machines for solving gravity and SPH. It uses the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) to calculate gravitational forces between nearby particles, combining these with long-range forces provided by a mesh that captures both the periodic nature of the calculation and the expansion of the simulated universe. SWIFT currently uses a single fixed but time-variable softening length for all the particles. Many useful external potentials are also available, such as galaxy haloes or stratified boxes that are used in idealised problems. SWIFT implements a standard LCDM cosmology background expansion and solves the equations in a comoving frame; equations of state of dark-energy evolve with scale-factor. The structure of the code allows implementation for modified-gravity solvers or self-interacting dark matter schemes to be implemented. Many hydrodynamics schemes are implemented in SWIFT and the software allows users to add their own.

[ascl:1805.019] HENDRICS: High ENergy Data Reduction Interface from the Command Shell

HENDRICS, a rewrite and update to MaLTPyNT (ascl:1502.021), contains command-line scripts based on Stingray (ascl:1608.001) to perform a quick-look (spectral-)timing analysis of X-ray data, treating the gaps in the data due, e.g., to occultation from the Earth or passages through the SAA, properly. Despite its original main focus on NuSTAR, HENDRICS can perform standard aperiodic timing analysis on X-ray data from, in principle, any other satellite, and its features include power density and cross spectra, time lags, pulsar searches with the Epoch folding and the Z_n^2 statistics, color-color and color-intensity diagrams. The periodograms produced by HENDRICS (such as a power density spectrum or a cospectrum) can be saved in a format compatible with XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) or ISIS (ascl:1302.002)

[ascl:1805.018] CUBE: Information-optimized parallel cosmological N-body simulation code

CUBE, written in Coarray Fortran, is a particle-mesh based parallel cosmological N-body simulation code. The memory usage of CUBE can approach as low as 6 bytes per particle. Particle pairwise (PP) force, cosmological neutrinos, spherical overdensity (SO) halofinder are included.

[ascl:1805.017] SNSEDextend: SuperNova Spectral Energy Distributions extrapolation toolkit

SNSEDextend extrapolates core-collapse and Type Ia Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) into the UV and IR for use in simulations and photometric classifications. The user provides a library of existing SED templates (such as those in the authors' SN SED Repository) along with new photometric constraints in the UV and/or NIR wavelength ranges. The software then extends the existing template SEDs so their colors match the input data at all phases. SNSEDextend can also extend the SALT2 spectral time-series model for Type Ia SN for a "first-order" extrapolation of the SALT2 model components, suitable for use in survey simulations and photometric classification tools; as the code does not do a rigorous re-training of the SALT2 model, the results should not be relied on for precision applications such as light curve fitting for cosmology.

[ascl:1805.016] xspec_emcee: XSPEC-friendly interface for the emcee package

XSPEC_EMCEE is an XSPEC-friendly interface for emcee (ascl:1303.002). It carries out MCMC analyses of X-ray spectra in the X-ray spectral fitting program XSPEC (ascl:9910.005). It can run multiple xspec processes simultaneously, speeding up the analysis, and can switch to parameterizing norm
parameters in log space.

[ascl:1805.015] BinMag: Widget for comparing stellar observed with theoretical spectra

BinMag examines theoretical stellar spectra computed with Synth/SynthMag/Synmast/Synth3/SME spectrum synthesis codes and compare them to observations. An IDL widget program, BinMag applies radial velocity shift and broadening to the theoretical spectra to account for the effects of stellar rotation, radial-tangential macroturbulence, instrumental smearing. The code can also simulate spectra of spectroscopic binary stars by appropriate coaddition of two synthetic spectra. Additionally, BinMag can be used to measure equivalent width, fit line profile shapes with analytical functions, and to automatically determine radial velocity and broadening parameters. BinMag interfaces with the Synth3 (ascl:1212.010) and SME (ascl:1202.013) codes, allowing the user to determine chemical abundances and stellar atmospheric parameters from the observed spectra.

[ascl:1805.014] OSS: OSSOS Survey Simulator

Comparing properties of discovered trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) with dynamical models is impossible due to the observational biases that exist in surveys. The OSSOS Survey Simulator takes an intrinsic orbital model (from, for example, the output of a dynamical Kuiper belt emplacement simulation) and applies the survey biases, so the biased simulated objects can be directly compared with real discoveries.

[ascl:1805.012] Arcmancer: Geodesics and polarized radiative transfer library

Arcmancer computes geodesics and performs polarized radiative transfer in user-specified spacetimes. The library supports Riemannian and semi-Riemannian spaces of any dimension and metric; it also supports multiple simultaneous coordinate charts, embedded geometric shapes, local coordinate systems, and automatic parallel propagation. Arcmancer can be used to solve various problems in numerical geometry, such as solving the curve equation of motion using adaptive integration with configurable tolerances and differential equations along precomputed curves. It also provides support for curves with an arbitrary acceleration term and generic tools for generating ray initial conditions and performing parallel computation over the image, among other tools.

[ascl:1805.011] PoMiN: A Post-Minkowskian N-Body Solver

PoMiN is a lightweight N-body code based on the Post-Minkowskian N-body Hamiltonian of Ledvinka, Schafer, and Bicak, which includes General Relativistic effects up to first order in Newton's constant G, and all orders in the speed of light c. PoMiN is a single file written in C and uses a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. PoMiN has also been written to handle an arbitrary number of particles (both massive and massless) with a computational complexity that scales as O(N^2).

[ascl:1805.010] StarSmasher: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code for smashing stars and planets

Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a Lagrangian particle method that approximates a continuous fluid as discrete nodes, each carrying various parameters such as mass, position, velocity, pressure, and temperature. In an SPH simulation the resolution scales with the particle density; StarSmasher is able to handle both equal-mass and equal number-density particle models. StarSmasher solves for hydro forces by calculating the pressure for each particle as a function of the particle's properties - density, internal energy, and internal properties (e.g. temperature and mean molecular weight). The code implements variational equations of motion and libraries to calculate the gravitational forces between particles using direct summation on NVIDIA graphics cards. Using a direct summation instead of a tree-based algorithm for gravity increases the accuracy of the gravity calculations at the cost of speed. The code uses a cubic spline for the smoothing kernel and an artificial viscosity prescription coupled with a Balsara Switch to prevent unphysical interparticle penetration. The code also implements an artificial relaxation force to the equations of motion to add a drag term to the calculated accelerations during relaxation integrations. Initially called StarCrash, StarSmasher was developed originally by Rasio.

[ascl:1805.009] STARBLADE: STar and Artefact Removal with a Bayesian Lightweight Algorithm from Diffuse Emission

STARBLADE (STar and Artefact Removal with a Bayesian Lightweight Algorithm from Diffuse Emission) separates superimposed point-like sources from a diffuse background by imposing physically motivated models as prior knowledge. The algorithm can also be used on noisy and convolved data, though performing a proper reconstruction including a deconvolution prior to the application of the algorithm is advised; the algorithm could also be used within a denoising imaging method. STARBLADE learns the correlation structure of the diffuse emission and takes it into account to determine the occurrence and strength of a superimposed point source.

[ascl:1805.008] AGAMA: Action-based galaxy modeling framework

The AGAMA library is a collection of tools for constructing and analyzing models of galaxies. It computes gravitational potential and forces, performs orbit integration and analysis, and can convert between position/velocity and action/angle coordinates. It offers a framework for finding best-fit parameters of a model from data and self-consistent multi-component galaxy models, and contains useful auxiliary utilities such as various mathematical routines. The core of the library is written in C++, and there are Python and Fortran interfaces. AGAMA may be used as a plugin for the stellar-dynamical software packages galpy (ascl:1411.008), AMUSE (ascl:1107.007), and NEMO (ascl:1010.051).

[ascl:1805.007] exocartographer: Constraining surface maps orbital parameters of exoplanets

exocartographer solves the exo-cartography inverse problem. This flexible forward-modeling framework, written in Python, retrieves the albedo map and spin geometry of a planet based on time-resolved photometry; it uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo method to extract albedo maps and planet spin and their uncertainties. Gaussian Processes use the data to fit for the characteristic length scale of the map and enforce smooth maps.

[ascl:1805.006] StePS: Stereographically Projected Cosmological Simulations

StePS (Stereographically Projected Cosmological Simulations) compactifies the infinite spatial extent of the Universe into a finite sphere with isotropic boundary conditions to simulate the evolution of the large-scale structure. This eliminates the need for periodic boundary conditions, which are a numerical convenience unsupported by observation and which modifies the law of force on large scales in an unrealistic fashion. StePS uses stereographic projection for space compactification and naive O(N2) force calculation; this arrives at a correlation function of the same quality more quickly than standard (tree or P3M) algorithms with similar spatial and mass resolution. The N2 force calculation is easy to adapt to modern graphics cards, hence StePS can function as a high-speed prediction tool for modern large-scale surveys.

[ascl:1805.005] 3DCORE: Forward modeling of solar storm magnetic flux ropes for space weather prediction

3DCORE forward models solar storm magnetic flux ropes called 3-Dimensional Coronal Rope Ejection (3DCORE). The code is able to produce synthetic in situ observations of the magnetic cores of solar coronal mass ejections sweeping over planets and spacecraft. Near Earth, these data are taken currently by the Wind, ACE and DSCOVR spacecraft. Other suitable spacecraft making these kind of observations carrying magnetometers in the solar wind were MESSENGER, Venus Express, MAVEN, and even Helios.

[ascl:1805.004] EARL: Exoplanet Analytic Reflected Lightcurves package

EARL (Exoplanet Analytic Reflected Lightcurves) computes the analytic form of a reflected lightcurve, given a spherical harmonic decomposition of the planet albedo map and the viewing and orbital geometries. The EARL Mathematica notebook allows rapid computation of reflected lightcurves, thus making lightcurve numerical experiments accessible.

[ascl:1805.003] lcps: Light curve pre-selection

lcps searches for transit-like features (i.e., dips) in photometric data. Its main purpose is to restrict large sets of light curves to a number of files that show interesting behavior, such as drops in flux. While lcps is adaptable to any format of time series, its I/O module is designed specifically for photometry of the Kepler spacecraft. It extracts the pre-conditioned PDCSAP data from light curves files created by the standard Kepler pipeline. It can also handle csv-formatted ascii files. lcps uses a sliding window technique to compare a section of flux time series with its surroundings. A dip is detected if the flux within the window is lower than a threshold fraction of the surrounding fluxes.

[ascl:1805.002] dftools: Distribution function fitting

dftools, written in R, finds the most likely P parameters of a D-dimensional distribution function (DF) generating N objects, where each object is specified by D observables with measurement uncertainties. For instance, if the objects are galaxies, it can fit a mass function (D=1), a mass-size distribution (D=2) or the mass-spin-morphology distribution (D=3). Unlike most common fitting approaches, this method accurately accounts for measurement in uncertainties and complex selection functions.

[ascl:1805.001] powerbox: Arbitrarily structured, arbitrary-dimension boxes and log-normal mocks

powerbox creates density grids (or boxes) with an arbitrary two-point distribution (i.e. power spectrum). The software works in any number of dimensions, creates Gaussian or Log-Normal fields, and measures power spectra of output fields to ensure consistency. The primary motivation for creating the code was the simple creation of log-normal mock galaxy distributions, but the methodology can be used for other applications.

[submitted] pydftools: Distribution function fitting in Python

pydftools is a pure-python port of the dftools R package (ascl:1805.002), which finds the most likely P parameters of a D-dimensional distribution function (DF) generating N objects, where each object is specified by D observables with measurement uncertainties. For instance, if the objects are galaxies, it can fit a MF (P=1), a mass-size distribution (P=2) or the mass-spin-morphology distribution (P=3). Unlike most common fitting approaches, this method accurately accounts for measurement in uncertainties and complex selection functions. Though this package imitates the dftools package quite closely while being as Pythonic as possible, it has not implemented 2D+ nor non-parametric.

[ascl:1804.026] KSTAT: KD-tree Statistics Package

KSTAT calculates the 2 and 3-point correlation functions in discreet point data. These include the two-point correlation function in 2 and 3-dimensions, the anisotripic 2PCF decomposed in either sigma-pi or Kazin's dist. mu projection. The 3-point correlation function can also work in anisotropic coordinates. The code is based on kd-tree structures and is parallelized using a mixture of MPI and OpenMP.

[ascl:1804.025] FastChem: An ultra-fast equilibrium chemistry

FastChem is an equilibrium chemistry code that calculates the chemical composition of the gas phase for given temperatures and pressures. Written in C++, it is based on a semi-analytic approach, and is optimized for extremely fast and accurate calculations.

[ascl:1804.024] LFlGRB: Luminosity function of long gamma-ray bursts

LFlGRB models the luminosity function (LF) of long Gamma Ray Bursts (lGRBs) by using a sample of Swift and Fermi lGRBs to re-derive the parameters of the Yonetoku correlation and self-consistently estimate pseudo-redshifts of all the bursts with unknown redshifts. The GRB formation rate is modeled as the product of the cosmic star formation rate and a GRB formation efficiency for a given stellar mass.

[ascl:1804.023] LFsGRB: Binary neutron star merger rate via the luminosity function of short gamma-ray bursts

LFsGRB models the luminosity function (LF) of short Gamma Ray Bursts (sGRBs) by using the available catalog data of all short GRBs (sGRBs) detected till 2017 October, estimating the luminosities via pseudo-redshifts obtained from the Yonetoku correlation, and then assuming a standard delay distribution between the cosmic star formation rate and the production rate of their progenitors. The data are fit well both by exponential cutoff powerlaw and broken powerlaw models. Using the derived parameters of these models along with conservative values in the jet opening angles seen from afterglow observations, the true rate of short GRBs is derived. Assuming a short GRB is produced from each binary neutron star merger (BNSM), the rate of gravitational wave (GW) detections from these mergers are derived for the past, present and future configurations of the GW detector networks.

[ascl:1804.022] UniDAM: Unified tool to estimate Distances, Ages, and Masses

UniDAM obtains a homogenized set of stellar parameters from spectrophotometric data of different surveys. Parallax and extinction data can be incorporated into the isochrone fitting method used in UniDAM to reduce distance and age estimate uncertainties for TGAS stars for distances up to 1 kpc and decrease distance Gaia end-of-mission parallax uncertainties by about a factor of 20 and age uncertainties by a factor of two for stars up to 10 kpc away from the Sun.

[ascl:1804.021] allantools: Allan deviation calculation

allantools calculates Allan deviation and related time & frequency statistics. The library is written in Python and has a GPL v3+ license. It takes input data that is either evenly spaced observations of either fractional frequency, or phase in seconds. Deviations are calculated for given tau values in seconds. Several noise generators for creating synthetic datasets are also included.

[ascl:1804.020] Agatha: Disentangling period signals from correlated noise in a periodogram framework

Agatha is a framework of periodograms to disentangle periodic signals from correlated noise and to solve the two-dimensional model selection problem: signal dimension and noise model dimension. These periodograms are calculated by applying likelihood maximization and marginalization and combined in a self-consistent way. Agatha can be used to select the optimal noise model and to test the consistency of signals in time and can be applied to time series analyses in other astronomical and scientific disciplines. An interactive web implementation of the software is also available at http://agatha.herts.ac.uk/.

[ascl:1804.019] ViSBARD: Visual System for Browsing, Analysis and Retrieval of Data

ViSBARD interactively visualizes and analyzes space physics data. It provides an interactive integrated 3-D and 2-D environment to determine correlations between measurements across many spacecraft. It supports a variety of spacecraft data products and MHD models and is easily extensible to others. ViSBARD provides a way of visualizing multiple vector and scalar quantities as measured by many spacecraft at once. The data are displayed three-dimesionally along the orbits which may be displayed either as connected lines or as points. The data display allows the rapid determination of vector configurations, correlations between many measurements at multiple points, and global relationships. With the addition of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model data, this environment can also be used to validate simulation results with observed data, use simulated data to provide a global context for sparse observed data, and apply feature detection techniques to the simulated data.

[ascl:1804.018] 3DView: Space physics data visualizer

3DView creates visualizations of space physics data in their original 3D context. Time series, vectors, dynamic spectra, celestial body maps, magnetic field or flow lines, and 2D cuts in simulation cubes are among the variety of data representation enabled by 3DView. It offers direct connections to several large databases and uses VO standards; it also allows the user to upload data. 3DView's versatility covers a wide range of space physics contexts.

[ascl:1804.017] APPHi: Automated Photometry Pipeline for High Cadence Large Volume Data

APPHi (Automated Photometry Pipeline) carries out aperture and differential photometry of TAOS-II project data. It is computationally efficient and can be used also with other astronomical wide-field image data. APPHi works with large volumes of data and handles both FITS and HDF5 formats. Due the large number of stars that the software has to handle in an enormous number of frames, it is optimized to automatically find the best value for parameters to carry out the photometry, such as mask size for aperture, size of window for extraction of a single star, and the number of counts for the threshold for detecting a faint star. Although intended to work with TAOS-II data, APPHi can analyze any set of astronomical images and is a robust and versatile tool to performing stellar aperture and differential photometry.

[ascl:1804.016] surrkick: Black-hole kicks from numerical-relativity surrogate models

surrkick quickly and reliably extract recoils imparted to generic, precessing, black hole binaries. It uses a numerical-relativity surrogate model to obtain the gravitational waveform given a set of binary parameters, and from this waveform directly integrates the gravitational-wave linear momentum flux. This entirely bypasses the need of fitting formulae which are typically used to model black-hole recoils in astrophysical contexts.

[ascl:1804.015] NR-code: Nonlinear reconstruction code

NR-code applies nonlinear reconstruction to the dark matter density field in redshift space and solves for the nonlinear mapping from the initial Lagrangian positions to the final redshift space positions; this reverses the large-scale bulk flows and improves the precision measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) scale.

[ascl:1804.014] IMNN: Information Maximizing Neural Networks

This software trains artificial neural networks to find non-linear functionals of data that maximize Fisher information: information maximizing neural networks (IMNNs). As compressing large data sets vastly simplifies both frequentist and Bayesian inference, important information may be inadvertently missed. Likelihood-free inference based on automatically derived IMNN summaries produces summaries that are good approximations to sufficient statistics. IMNNs are robustly capable of automatically finding optimal, non-linear summaries of the data even in cases where linear compression fails: inferring the variance of Gaussian signal in the presence of noise, inferring cosmological parameters from mock simulations of the Lyman-α forest in quasar spectra, and inferring frequency-domain parameters from LISA-like detections of gravitational waveforms. In this final case, the IMNN summary outperforms linear data compression by avoiding the introduction of spurious likelihood maxima.

[ascl:1804.013] CAT-PUMA: CME Arrival Time Prediction Using Machine learning Algorithms

CAT-PUMA (CME Arrival Time Prediction Using Machine learning Algorithms) quickly and accurately predicts the arrival of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) of CME arrival time. The software was trained via detailed analysis of CME features and solar wind parameters using 182 previously observed geo-effective partial-/full-halo CMEs and uses algorithms of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) to make its predictions, which can be made within minutes of providing the necessary input parameters of a CME.

[ascl:1804.012] Lenstronomy: Multi-purpose gravitational lens modeling software package

Lenstronomy is a multi-purpose open-source gravitational lens modeling python package. Lenstronomy reconstructs the lens mass and surface brightness distributions of strong lensing systems using forward modelling and supports a wide range of analytic lens and light models in arbitrary combination. The software is also able to reconstruct complex extended sources as well as point sources. Lenstronomy is flexible and numerically accurate, with a clear user interface that could be deployed across different platforms. Lenstronomy has been used to derive constraints on dark matter properties in strong lenses, measure the expansion history of the universe with time-delay cosmography, measure cosmic shear with Einstein rings, and decompose quasar and host galaxy light.

[ascl:1804.011] DESCQA: Synthetic Sky Catalog Validation Framework

The DESCQA framework provides rigorous validation protocols for assessing the quality of high-quality simulated sky catalogs in a straightforward and comprehensive way. DESCQA enables the inspection, validation, and comparison of an inhomogeneous set of synthetic catalogs via the provision of a common interface within an automated framework. An interactive web interface is also available at portal.nersc.gov/project/lsst/descqa.

[ascl:1804.010] SMERFS: Stochastic Markov Evaluation of Random Fields on the Sphere

SMERFS (Stochastic Markov Evaluation of Random Fields on the Sphere) creates large realizations of random fields on the sphere. It uses a fast algorithm based on Markov properties and fast Fourier Transforms in 1d that generates samples on an n X n grid in O(n2 log n) and efficiently derives the necessary conditional covariance matrices.

[ascl:1804.009] orbit-estimation: Fast orbital parameters estimator

orbit-estimation tests and evaluates the Stäckel approximation method for estimating orbit parameters in galactic potentials. It relies on the approximation of the Galactic potential as a Stäckel potential, in a prolate confocal coordinate system, under which the vertical and horizontal motions decouple. By solving the Hamilton Jacobi equations at the turning points of the horizontal and vertical motions, it is possible to determine the spatial boundary of the orbit, and hence calculate the desired orbit parameters.

[ascl:1804.008] EGG: Empirical Galaxy Generator

The Empirical Galaxy Generator (EGG) generates fake galaxy catalogs and images with realistic positions, morphologies and fluxes from the far-ultraviolet to the far-infrared. The catalogs are generated by egg-gencat and stored in binary FITS tables (column oriented). Another program, egg-2skymaker, is used to convert the generated catalog into ASCII tables suitable for ingestion by SkyMaker (ascl:1010.066) to produce realistic high resolution images (e.g., Hubble-like), while egg-gennoise and egg-genmap can be used to generate the low resolution images (e.g., Herschel-like). These tools can be used to test source extraction codes, or to evaluate the reliability of any map-based science (stacking, dropout identification, etc.).

[ascl:1804.007] chroma: Chromatic effects for LSST weak lensing

Chroma investigates biases originating from two chromatic effects in the atmosphere: differential chromatic refraction (DCR), and wavelength dependence of seeing. These biases arise when using the point spread function (PSF) measured with stars to estimate the shapes of galaxies with different spectral energy distributions (SEDs) than the stars.

[ascl:1804.006] ProFound: Source Extraction and Application to Modern Survey Data

ProFound detects sources in noisy images, generates segmentation maps identifying the pixels belonging to each source, and measures statistics like flux, size, and ellipticity. These inputs are key requirements of ProFit (ascl:1612.004), our galaxy profiling package; these two packages used in unison semi-automatically profile large samples of galaxies. The key novel feature introduced in ProFound is that all photometry is executed on dilated segmentation maps that fully contain the identifiable flux, rather than using more traditional circular or ellipse-based photometry. Also, to be less sensitive to pathological segmentation issues, the de-blending is made across saddle points in flux. ProFound offers good initial parameter estimation for ProFit, and also segmentation maps that follow the sometimes complex geometry of resolved sources, whilst capturing nearly all of the flux. A number of bulge-disc decomposition projects are already making use of the ProFound and ProFit pipeline.

[ascl:1804.005] DaCHS: Data Center Helper Suite

DaCHS, the Data Center Helper Suite, is an integrated package for publishing astronomical data sets to the Virtual Observatory. Network-facing, it speaks the major VO protocols (SCS, SIAP, SSAP, TAP, Datalink, etc). Operator-facing, many input formats, including FITS/WCS, ASCII files, and VOTable, can be processed to publication-ready data. DaCHS puts particular emphasis on integrated metadata handling, which facilitates a tight integration with the VO's Registry

[ascl:1804.004] AstroCV: Astronomy computer vision library

AstroCV processes and analyzes big astronomical datasets, and is intended to provide a community repository of high performance Python and C++ algorithms used for image processing and computer vision. The library offers methods for object recognition, segmentation and classification, with emphasis in the automatic detection and classification of galaxies.

[ascl:1804.003] DPPP: Default Pre-Processing Pipeline

DPPP (Default Pre-Processing Pipeline, also referred to as NDPPP) reads and writes radio-interferometric data in the form of Measurement Sets, mainly those that are created by the LOFAR telescope. It goes through visibilities in time order and contains standard operations like averaging, phase-shifting and flagging bad stations. Between the steps in a pipeline, the data is not written to disk, making this tool suitable for operations where I/O dominates. More advanced procedures such as gain calibration are also included. Other computing steps can be provided by loading a shared library; currently supported external steps are the AOFlagger (ascl:1010.017) and a bridge that enables loading python steps.

[ascl:1804.002] ipole: Semianalytic scheme for relativistic polarized radiative transport

ipole is a ray-tracing code for covariant, polarized radiative transport particularly useful for modeling Event Horizon Telescope sources, though may also be used for other relativistic transport problems. The code extends the ibothros scheme for covariant, unpolarized transport using two representations of the polarized radiation field: in the coordinate frame, it parallel transports the coherency tensor, and in the frame of the plasma, it evolves the Stokes parameters under emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion. The transport step is as spacetime- and coordinate- independent as possible; the emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion step is implemented using an analytic solution to the polarized transport equation with constant coefficients. As a result, ipole is stable, efficient, and produces a physically reasonable solution even for a step with high optical depth and Faraday depth.

[ascl:1804.001] ASERA: A Spectrum Eye Recognition Assistant

ASERA, ASpectrum Eye Recognition Assistant, aids in quasar spectral recognition and redshift measurement and can also be used to recognize various types of spectra of stars, galaxies and AGNs (Active Galactic Nucleus). This interactive software allows users to visualize observed spectra, superimpose template spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and interactively access related spectral line information. ASERA is an efficient and user-friendly semi-automated toolkit for the accurate classification of spectra observed by LAMOST (the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) and is available as a standalone Java application and as a Java applet. The software offers several functions, including wavelength and flux scale settings, zoom in and out, redshift estimation, and spectral line identification.

[ascl:1803.015] RAPTOR: Imaging code for relativistic plasmas in strong gravity

RAPTOR produces accurate images, animations, and spectra of relativistic plasmas in strong gravity by numerically integrating the equations of motion of light rays and performing time-dependent radiative transfer calculations along the rays. The code is compatible with any analytical or numerical spacetime, is hardware-agnostic and may be compiled and run on both GPUs and CPUs. RAPTOR is useful for studying accretion models of supermassive black holes, performing time-dependent radiative transfer through general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (GRMHD) simulations and investigating the expected observational differences between the so-called fastlight and slow-light paradigms.

[ascl:1803.014] ExoCross: Spectra from molecular line lists

ExoCross generates spectra and thermodynamic properties from molecular line lists in ExoMol, HITRAN, or several other formats. The code is parallelized and also shows a high degree of vectorization; it works with line profiles such as Doppler, Lorentzian and Voigt and supports several broadening schemes. ExoCross is also capable of working with the recently proposed method of super-lines. It supports calculations of lifetimes, cooling functions, specific heats and other properties. ExoCross converts between different formats, such as HITRAN, ExoMol and Phoenix, and simulates non-LTE spectra using a simple two-temperature approach. Different electronic, vibronic or vibrational bands can be simulated separately using an efficient filtering scheme based on the quantum numbers.

[ascl:1803.013] optBINS: Optimal Binning for histograms

optBINS (optimal binning) determines the optimal number of bins in a uniform bin-width histogram by deriving the posterior probability for the number of bins in a piecewise-constant density model after assigning a multinomial likelihood and a non-informative prior. The maximum of the posterior probability occurs at a point where the prior probability and the the joint likelihood are balanced. The interplay between these opposing factors effectively implements Occam's razor by selecting the most simple model that best describes the data.

[ascl:1803.012] LWPC: Long Wavelength Propagation Capability

Long Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC), written as a collection of separate programs that perform unique actions, generates geographical maps of signal availability for coverage analysis. The program makes it easy to set up these displays by automating most of the required steps. The user specifies the transmitter location and frequency, the orientation of the transmitting and receiving antennae, and the boundaries of the operating area. The program automatically selects paths along geographic bearing angles to ensure that the operating area is fully covered. The diurnal conditions and other relevant geophysical parameters are then determined along each path. After the mode parameters along each path are determined, the signal strength along each path is computed. The signal strength along the paths is then interpolated onto a grid overlying the operating area. The final grid of signal strength values is used to display the signal-strength in a geographic display. The LWPC uses character strings to control programs and to specify options. The control strings have the same meaning and use among all the programs.

[ascl:1803.011] ExtLaw_H18: Extinction law code

ExtLaw_H18 generates the extinction law between 0.8 - 2.2 microns. The law is derived using the Westerlund 1 (Wd1) main sequence (A_Ks ~ 0.6 mag) and Arches cluster field Red Clump at the Galactic Center (A_Ks ~ 2.7 mag). To derive the law a Wd1 cluster age of 5 Myr is assumed, though changing the cluster age between 4 Myr -- 7 Myr has no effect on the law. This extinction law can be applied to highly reddened stellar populations that have similar foreground material as Wd1 and the Arches RC, namely dust from the spiral arms of the Milky Way in the Galactic Plane.

[ascl:1803.010] 3D-PDR: Three-dimensional photodissociation region code

3D-PDR is a three-dimensional photodissociation region code written in Fortran. It uses the Sundials package (written in C) to solve the set of ordinary differential equations and it is the successor of the one-dimensional PDR code UCL_PDR (ascl:1303.004). Using the HEALpix ray-tracing scheme (ascl:1107.018), 3D-PDR solves a three-dimensional escape probability routine and evaluates the attenuation of the far-ultraviolet radiation in the PDR and the propagation of FIR/submm emission lines out of the PDR. The code is parallelized (OpenMP) and can be applied to 1D and 3D problems.

[ascl:1803.009] SETI-EC: SETI Encryption Code

The SETI Encryption code, written in Python, creates a message for use in testing the decryptability of a simulated incoming interstellar message. The code uses images in a portable bit map (PBM) format, then writes the corresponding bits into the message, and finally returns both a PBM image and a text (TXT) file of the entire message. The natural constants (c, G, h) and the wavelength of the message are defined in the first few lines of the code, followed by the reading of the input files and their conversion into 757 strings of 359 bits to give one page. Each header of a page, i.e. the little-endian binary code translation of the tempo-spatial yardstick, is calculated and written on-the-fly for each page.

[ascl:1803.008] FAST: Fitting and Assessment of Synthetic Templates

FAST (Fitting and Assessment of Synthetic Templates) fits stellar population synthesis templates to broadband photometry and/or spectra. FAST is compatible with the photometric redshift code EAzY (ascl:1010.052) when fitting broadband photometry; it uses the photometric redshifts derived by EAzY, and the input files (for examply, photometric catalog and master filter file) are the same. FAST fits spectra in combination with broadband photometric data points or simultaneously fits two components, allowing for an AGN contribution in addition to the host galaxy light. Depending on the input parameters, FAST outputs the best-fit redshift, age, dust content, star formation timescale, metallicity, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and their confidence intervals. Though some of FAST's functions overlap with those of HYPERZ (ascl:1108.010), it differs by fitting fluxes instead of magnitudes, allows the user to completely define the grid of input stellar population parameters and easily input photometric redshifts and their confidence intervals, and calculates calibrated confidence intervals for all parameters. Note that FAST is not a photometric redshift code, though it can be used as one.

[ascl:1803.007] IMAGINE: Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine

IMAGINE (Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine) performs inference on generic parametric models of the Galaxy. The modular open source framework uses highly optimized tools and technology such as the MultiNest sampler (ascl:1109.006) and the information field theory framework NIFTy (ascl:1302.013) to create an instance of the Milky Way based on a set of parameters for physical observables, using Bayesian statistics to judge the mismatch between measured data and model prediction. The flexibility of the IMAGINE framework allows for simple refitting for newly available data sets and makes state-of-the-art Bayesian methods easily accessible particularly for random components of the Galactic magnetic field.

[ascl:1803.006] MulensModel: Microlensing light curves modeling

MulensModel calculates light curves of microlensing events. Both single and binary lens events are modeled and various higher-order effects can be included: extended source (with limb-darkening), annual microlensing parallax, and satellite microlensing parallax. The code is object-oriented and written in Python3, and requires AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1803.005] Kadenza: Kepler/K2 Raw Cadence Data Reader

Kadenza enables time-critical data analyses to be carried out using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. It enables users to convert Kepler's raw data files into user-friendly Target Pixel Files upon downlink from the spacecraft. The primary motivation for this tool is to enable the microlensing, supernova, and exoplanet communities to create quicklook lightcurves for transient events which require rapid follow-up.

[ascl:1803.004] nanopipe: Calibration and data reduction pipeline for pulsar timing

nanopipe is a data reduction pipeline for calibration, RFI removal, and pulse time-of-arrival measurement from radio pulsar data. It was developed primarily for use by the NANOGrav project. nanopipe is written in Python, and depends on the PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) library.

[ascl:1803.003] scarlet: Source separation in multi-band images by Constrained Matrix Factorization

SCARLET performs source separation (aka "deblending") on multi-band images. It is geared towards optical astronomy, where scenes are composed of stars and galaxies, but it is straightforward to apply it to other imaging data. Separation is achieved through a constrained matrix factorization, which models each source with a Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) and a non-parametric morphology, or multiple such components per source. The code performs forced photometry (with PSF matching if needed) using an optimal weight function given by the signal-to-noise weighted morphology across bands. The approach works well if the sources in the scene have different colors and can be further strengthened by imposing various additional constraints/priors on each source. Because of its generic utility, this package provides a stand-alone implementation that contains the core components of the source separation algorithm. However, the development of this package is part of the LSST Science Pipeline; the meas_deblender package contains a wrapper to implement the algorithms here for the LSST stack.

[ascl:1803.002] CIFOG: Cosmological Ionization Fields frOm Galaxies

CIFOG is a versatile MPI-parallelised semi-numerical tool to perform simulations of the Epoch of Reionization. From a set of evolving cosmological gas density and ionizing emissivity fields, it computes the time and spatially dependent ionization of neutral hydrogen (HI), neutral (HeI) and singly ionized helium (HeII) in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The code accounts for HII, HeII, HeIII recombinations, and provides different descriptions for the photoionization rate that are used to calculate the residual HI fraction in ionized regions. This tool has been designed to be coupled to semi-analytic galaxy formation models or hydrodynamical simulations. The modular fashion of the code allows the user to easily introduce new descriptions for recombinations and the photoionization rate.

[submitted] PyVO: a package providing access to the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python

PyVO provides access to remote data and services of the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python. It takes advantage VO standards to interface to tens of thousands of catalogs, data archives, information services, and analysis tools. PyVO is built on top of Astropy (and numpy). The VO protocols support by pyVO include the Table Access Protocol TAP, the Simple Image and Spectra Access Protocols (SIAP, SSAP), Simple Cone Search (SCS), the VO services interface VOSI, and Datalink.

[ascl:1803.001] DaMaSCUS-CRUST: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings - Crust Edition

DaMaSCUS-CRUST determines the critical cross-section for strongly interacting DM for various direct detection experiments systematically and precisely using Monte Carlo simulations of DM trajectories inside the Earth's crust, atmosphere, or any kind of shielding. Above a critical dark matter-nucleus scattering cross section, any terrestrial direct detection experiment loses sensitivity to dark matter, since the Earth crust, atmosphere, and potential shielding layers start to block off the dark matter particles. This critical cross section is commonly determined by describing the average energy loss of the dark matter particles analytically. However, this treatment overestimates the stopping power of the Earth crust; therefore, the obtained bounds should be considered as conservative. DaMaSCUS-CRUST is a modified version of DaMaSCUS (ascl:1706.003) that accounts for shielding effects and returns a precise exclusion band.

[ascl:1802.016] eqpair: Electron energy distribution calculator

eqpair computes the electron energy distribution resulting from a balance between heating and direct acceleration of particles, and cooling processes. Electron-positron pair balance, bremstrahlung, and Compton cooling, including external soft photon input, are among the processes considered, and the final electron distribution can be hybrid, thermal, or non-thermal.

[ascl:1802.015] mrpy: Renormalized generalized gamma distribution for HMF and galaxy ensemble properties comparisons

mrpy calculates the MRP parameterization of the Halo Mass Function. It calculates basic statistics of the truncated generalized gamma distribution (TGGD) with the TGGD class, including mean, mode, variance, skewness, pdf, and cdf. It generates MRP quantities with the MRP class, such as differential number counts and cumulative number counts, and offers various methods for generating normalizations. It can generate the MRP-based halo mass function as a function of physical parameters via the mrp_b13 function, and fit MRP parameters to data in the form of arbitrary curves and in the form of a sample of variates with the SimFit class. mrpy also calculates analytic hessians and jacobians at any point, and allows the user to alternate parameterizations of the same form via the reparameterize module.

[ascl:1802.014] collapse: Spherical-collapse model code

collapse calculates the spherical−collapse for standard cosmological models as well as for dark energy models when the dark energy can be taken to be spatially homogeneous. The calculation is valid on sub−horizon scales and takes a top−hat perturbation to exist in an otherwise featureless cosmos and follows its evolution into the non−linear regime where it reaches a maximum size and then recollapses. collapse provides the user with the linear−collapse threshold (delta_c) and the virial overdensity (Delta_v) for the collapsed halo over a range of cosmic scale factors.

[ascl:1802.013] BHMcalc: Binary Habitability Mechanism Calculator

BHMcalc provides renditions of the instantaneous circumbinary habital zone (CHZ) and also calculates BHM properties of the system including those related to the rotational evolution of the stellar components and the combined XUV and SW fluxes as measured at different distances from the binary. Moreover, it provides numerical results that can be further manipulated and used to calculate other properties.

[ascl:1802.012] PyOSE: Orbital sampling effect (OSE) simulator

PyOSE is a fully numerical orbital sampling effect (OSE) simulator that can model arbitrary inclinations of the transiting moon orbit. It can be used to search for exomoons in long-term stellar light curves such as those by Kepler and the upcoming PLATO mission.

[ascl:1802.011] runDM: Running couplings of Dark Matter to the Standard Model

runDM calculates the running of the couplings of Dark Matter (DM) to the Standard Model (SM) in simplified models with vector mediators. By specifying the mass of the mediator and the couplings of the mediator to SM fields at high energy, the code can calculate the couplings at low energy, taking into account the mixing of all dimension-6 operators. runDM can also extract the operator coefficients relevant for direct detection, namely low energy couplings to up, down and strange quarks and to protons and neutrons.

[ascl:1802.010] Glimpse: Sparsity based weak lensing mass-mapping tool

Glimpse, also known as Glimpse2D, is a weak lensing mass-mapping tool that relies on a robust sparsity-based regularization scheme to recover high resolution convergence from either gravitational shear alone or from a combination of shear and flexion. Including flexion allows the supplementation of the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map. To preserve all available small scale information, Glimpse avoids any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treats the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularized using a multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators.

[ascl:1802.009] astroplan: Observation planning package for astronomers

astroplan is a flexible toolbox for observation planning and scheduling. It is powered by Astropy (ascl:1304.002); it works for Python beginners and new observers, and is powerful enough for observatories preparing nightly and long-term schedules as well. It calculates rise/set/meridian transit times, alt/az positions for targets at observatories anywhere on Earth, and offers built-in plotting convenience functions for standard observation planning plots (airmass, parallactic angle, sky maps). It can also determine the observability of sets of targets given an arbitrary set of constraints (i.e., altitude, airmass, moon separation/illumination, etc.).

[ascl:1802.008] AntiparticleDM: Discriminating between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter

AntiparticleDM calculates the prospects of future direct detection experiments to discriminate between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter (i.e., to determine whether Dark Matter is its own antiparticle). Direct detection event rates and mock data generation are dealt with by a variation of the WIMpy code.

[ascl:1802.007] HiGal_SED_Fitter: SED fitting tools for Herschel Hi-Gal data

HiGal SED Fitter fits modified blackbody SEDs to Herschel data, specifically targeted at Herschel Hi-Gal data.

[submitted] muLAn (MICROlensing Analysis software): a public software to model gravitational microlensing events

muLAn is a Python modeling software developed to analyze and fit light curves of gravitational microlensing events. The software has been designed to be easy to use even for the newcomer in microlensing, thanks to external, synthetic and self-explanatory setup files containing all important commands and option settings. The user may choose to launch the code through command line instructions, or to import muLAn within another Python project like any standard Python package. It also comes with many useful routines (export publication-quality figures, data formatting and cleaning) and state-of-the-art statistical tools. The result of the modeling can be interpreted using an interactive html page which contains all information about the light curve model, caustics, source trajectory, best-fit parameters and chi-square. Parameters uncertainties and statistical properties (such as multi-modal features of the posterior density) can be assessed from correlation plots. The code includes all classical microlensing models (single and binary microlenses, ground- and space-based parallax effects, orbital motion, finite-source effects, limb-darkening, etc.) which can be combined into several time intervals of the analyzed light curve. Minimization methods include an Affine-Invariant Ensemble Sampler to generate a multivariate proposal function while running several Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, for the set of parameters which is chosen to be fit; non-fitting parameters can be either kept fixed or set on a grid defined by the user. Furthermore, the software offers a model-free option to align all data sets together and allows to inspect the light curve before any modeling work. The code is modular: users can add their own model's computation or minimization routines by directly adding their Python files without modifying the main code. This flexibility aims to offer a valuable framework to develop automated open-source microlensing modeling codes.

[ascl:1802.006] VISIBLE: VISIbility Based Line Extraction

VISIBLE applies approximated matched filters to interferometric data, allowing line detection directly in visibility space. The filter can be created from a FITS image or RADMC3D output image, and the weak line data can be a CASA MS or uvfits file. The filter response spectrum can be output either to a .npy file or returned back to the user for scripting.

[ascl:1802.005] Verne: Earth-stopping effect for heavy dark matter

Verne calculates the Earth-stopping effect for super-heavy Dark Matter (DM). The code allows you to calculate the speed distribution (and DM signal rate) at an arbitrary detector location on the Earth. The calculation takes into account the full anisotropic DM velocity distribution and the full velocity dependence of the DM-nucleus cross section. Results can be obtained for any DM mass and cross section, though the results are most reliable for very heavy DM particles.

[submitted] Opik Collision Probability

The Opik method gives the mean probability of collision of a small body with a given planet. It is a statistical value valid for an orbit with given (a,e,i) and undefined argument of perihelion. In some cases, the planet can eject the small body from the solar system; in these cases, the program estimates the mean time for the ejection. The Opik method does not take into account other perturbers than the planet considered, so it only provides an idea of the timescales involved.

[ascl:1802.004] ARTIP: Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline

The Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline (ARTIP) automates the entire process of flagging, calibrating, and imaging for radio-interferometric data. ARTIP starts with raw data, i.e. a measurement set and goes through multiple stages, such as flux calibration, bandpass calibration, phase calibration, and imaging to generate continuum and spectral line images. Each stage can also be run independently. The pipeline provides continuous feedback to the user through various messages, charts and logs. It is written using standard python libraries and the CASA package. The pipeline can deal with datasets with multiple spectral windows and also multiple target sources which may have arbitrary combinations of flux/bandpass/phase calibrators.

[ascl:1802.003] CMacIonize: Monte Carlo photoionisation and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics

CMacIonize simulates the self-consistent evolution of HII regions surrounding young O and B stars, or other sources of ionizing radiation. The code combines a Monte Carlo photoionization algorithm that uses a complex mix of hydrogen, helium and several coolants in order to self-consistently solve for the ionization and temperature balance at any given time, with a standard first order hydrodynamics scheme. The code can be run as a post-processing tool to get the line emission from an existing simulation snapshot, but can also be used to run full radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Both the radiation transfer and the hydrodynamics are implemented in a general way that is independent of the grid structure that is used to discretize the system, allowing it to be run both as a standard fixed grid code and also as a moving-mesh code.

[ascl:1802.002] venice: Mask utility

venice reads a mask file (DS9 or fits type) and a catalogue of objects (ascii or fits type) to create a pixelized mask, find objects inside/outside a mask, or generate a random catalogue of objects inside/outside a mask. The program reads the mask file and checks if a point, giving its coordinates, is inside or outside the mask, i.e. inside or outside at least one polygon of the mask.

[ascl:1802.001] FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

[ascl:1801.012] RadVel: General toolkit for modeling Radial Velocities

RadVel models Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) time series. The code is written in Python with a fast Kepler's equation solver written in C. It provides a framework for fitting RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and computing robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel can perform Bayesian model comparison and produces publication quality plots and LaTeX tables.

[ascl:1801.011] GABE: Grid And Bubble Evolver

GABE (Grid And Bubble Evolver) evolves scalar fields (as well as other purposes) on an expanding background for non-canonical and non-linear classical field theory. GABE is based on the Runge-Kutta method.

[ascl:1801.010] DICE/ColDICE: 6D collisionless phase space hydrodynamics using a lagrangian tesselation

DICE is a C++ template library designed to solve collisionless fluid dynamics in 6D phase space using massively parallel supercomputers via an hybrid OpenMP/MPI parallelization. ColDICE, based on DICE, implements a cosmological and physical VLASOV-POISSON solver for cold systems such as dark matter (CDM) dynamics.

[ascl:1801.009] Gnuastro: GNU Astronomy Utilities

Gnuastro (GNU Astronomy Utilities) manipulates and analyzes astronomical data. It is an official GNU package of a large collection of programs and C/C++ library functions. Command-line programs perform arithmetic operations on images, convert FITS images to common types like JPG or PDF, convolve an image with a given kernel or matching of kernels, perform cosmological calculations, crop parts of large images (possibly in multiple files), manipulate FITS extensions and keywords, and perform statistical operations. In addition, it contains programs to make catalogs from detection maps, add noise, make mock profiles with a variety of radial functions using monte-carlo integration for their centers, match catalogs, and detect objects in an image among many other operations. The command-line programs share the same basic command-line user interface for the comfort of both the users and developers. Gnuastro is written to comply fully with the GNU coding standards and integrates well with all Unix-like operating systems. This enables astronomers to expect a fully familiar experience in the source code, building, installing and command-line user interaction that they have seen in all the other GNU software that they use. Gnuastro's extensive library is included for users who want to build their own unique programs.

[ascl:1801.008] BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations

BOND determines oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions by comparison with a large grid of photoionization models. The grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Unlike other statistical methods, BOND relies on the [Ar III]/[Ne III] emission line ratio to break the oxygen abundance bimodality. By doing so, it can measure oxygen and nitrogen abundances without assuming any a priori relation between N/O and O/H. BOND takes into account changes in the hardness of the ionizing radiation field, which can come about due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastically sampling of the IMF. The emission line ratio He I/Hβ, in addition to commonly used strong lines, constrains the hardness of the ionizing radiation field. BOND relies on the emission line ratios [O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ and [N II]/Hβ, [Ar III]/Hβ, [Ne III]/Hβ, He I/Hβ as its input parameters, while its output values are the measurements and uncertainties for O/H and N/O.

[ascl:1801.007] cambmag: Magnetic Fields in CAMB

cambmag is a modification to CAMB (ascl:1102.026) that calculates the compensated magnetic mode in the scalar, vector and tensor case. Previously CAMB included code only for the vectors. It also corrects for tight-coupling issues and adds in the ability to include massive neutrinos when calculating vector modes.

[ascl:1801.006] DecouplingModes: Passive modes amplitudes

DecouplingModes calculates the amplitude of the passive modes, which requires solving the Einstein equations on superhorizon scales sourced by the anisotropic stress from the magnetic fields (prior to neutrino decoupling), and the magnetic and neutrino stress (after decoupling). The code is available as a Mathematica notebook.

[ascl:1801.005] InitialConditions: Initial series solutions for perturbations in our Universe

InitialConditions finds the initial series solutions for perturbations in our Universe. This includes all scalar (1 adiabatic, 4 isocurvature and 2 magnetic modes), vector (1 vorticity mode, 1 magnetic mode), and tensor (1 gravitational wave mode and 1 magnetic mode) perturbations including terms up to second order in the neutrino mass. It can handle the standard species (cdm, baryons, photons), and two neutrino mass eigenstates (1 light, 1 heavy).

[ascl:1801.004] hh0: Hierarchical Hubble Constant Inference

hh0 is a Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM) that describes the full distance ladder, from nearby geometric-distance anchors through Cepheids to SNe in the Hubble flow. It does not rely on any of the underlying distributions being Gaussian, allowing outliers to be modeled and obviating the need for any arbitrary data cuts.

[ascl:1801.003] Stan: Statistical inference

Stan facilitates statistical inference at the frontiers of applied statistics and provides both a modeling language for specifying complex statistical models and a library of statistical algorithms for computing inferences with those models. These components are exposed through interfaces in environments such as R, Python, and the command line.

[ascl:1801.002] iWander: Dynamics of interstellar wanderers

iWander assesses the origin of interstellar small bodies such as asteroids and comets. It includes a series of databases and tools that can be used in general for studying the dynamics of an interstellar vagabond object (small−body, interstellar spaceship and even stars).

[ascl:1801.001] BANYAN_Sigma: Bayesian classifier for members of young stellar associations

BANYAN_Sigma calculates the membership probability that a given astrophysical object belongs to one of the currently known 27 young associations within 150 pc of the Sun, using Bayesian inference. This tool uses the sky position and proper motion measurements of an object, with optional radial velocity (RV) and distance (D) measurements, to derive a Bayesian membership probability. By default, the priors are adjusted such that a probability threshold of 90% will recover 50%, 68%, 82% or 90% of true association members depending on what observables are input (only sky position and proper motion, with RV, with D, with both RV and D, respectively). The algorithm is implemented in a Python package, in IDL, and is also implemented as an interactive web page.

[submitted] A Neural Network for the Identification of Dangerous Planetesimals (Including scripts for data generation)

Two neural networks were designed to identify hazardous planetesimals that were trained on object trajectories calculated in a cloud computing environment. The first neural network was fully-connected and was trained on the orbital elements (OEs) of real/simulated planetesimals, while the second was a 1-dimensional convolutional neural network that was trained on the position Cartesian coordinates of real/simulated planetesimals. Ultimately, the network trained on OEs had a better performance by identifying one-third of known potentially hazardous objects including the 3 asteroids with the highest chance of impact with Earth (2009 FD, 1999 RQ36, 1950 DA) as established by NASA's Monte Carlo based Sentry system.

[submitted] loci: Smooth Cubic Multivariate Local Interpolations

loci is a shared library for interpolations in up to 4 dimensions. It is written in C and can be used with C/C++, Python and others. In order to calculate the coefficients of the cubic polynom, only local values are used: The data itself and all combinations of first-order derivatives, i.e. in 2D f_x, f_y and f_xy. This is in contrast to splines, where the coefficients are not calculated using derivatives, but non-local data, which can lead to over-smoothing the result.

[ascl:1712.016] LgrbWorldModel: Long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

LgrbWorldModel is written in Fortran 90 and attempts to model the population distribution of the Long-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of LGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution. The best-fit parameters of the distribution are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC) Sampler.

[ascl:1712.015] SgrbWorldModel: Short-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

SgrbWorldModel, written in Fortran 90, presents an attempt at modeling the population distribution of the Short-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of SGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution, whose differential cosmological rate of occurrence follows the Star-Formation-Rate (SFR) convolved with a log-normal binary-merger delay-time distribution. The best-fit parameters of the model are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by the BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC)Sampler that is part of the code. A model for the detection algorithm of the BATSE detectors is also provided.

[ascl:1712.014] QATS: Quasiperiodic Automated Transit Search

QATS detects transiting extrasolar planets in time-series photometry. It relaxes the usual assumption of strictly periodic transits by permitting a variable, but bounded, interval between successive transits.

[ascl:1712.013] photodynam: Photodynamical code for fitting the light curves of multiple body systems

Photodynam facilitates so-called "photometric-dynamical" modeling. This model is quite simple and this is reflected in the code base. A N-body code provides coordinates and the photometric code produces light curves based on coordinates.

[ascl:1712.012] MadDM: Computation of dark matter relic abundance

MadDM computes dark matter relic abundance and dark matter nucleus scattering rates in a generic model. The code is based on the existing MadGraph 5 architecture and as such is easily integrable into any MadGraph collider study. A simple Python interface offers a level of user-friendliness characteristic of MadGraph 5 without sacrificing functionality. MadDM is able to calculate the dark matter relic abundance in models which include a multi-component dark sector, resonance annihilation channels and co-annihilations. The direct detection module of MadDM calculates spin independent / spin dependent dark matter-nucleon cross sections and differential recoil rates as a function of recoil energy, angle and time. The code provides a simplified simulation of detector effects for a wide range of target materials and volumes.

[ascl:1712.011] FBEYE: Analyzing Kepler light curves and validating flares

FBEYE, the "Flares By-Eye" detection suite, is written in IDL and analyzes Kepler light curves and validates flares. It works on any 3-column light curve that contains time, flux, and error. The success of flare identification is highly dependent on the smoothing routine, which may not be suitable for all sources.

[ascl:1712.010] Flux Tube: Solar model

Flux Tube is a nonlinear, two-dimensional, numerical simulation of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations are applied to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized by a special boundary condition.

[ascl:1712.009] RODRIGUES: RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software

RODRIGUES (RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software) is a web-based radio telescope simulation and reduction tool. From a technical perspective it is a web based parameterized docker container scheduler with a result set viewer.

[ascl:1712.008] CosApps: Simulate gravitational lensing through ray tracing and shear calculation

Cosmology Applications (CosApps) provides tools to simulate gravitational lensing using two different techniques, ray tracing and shear calculation. The tool ray_trace_ellipse calculates deflection angles on a grid for light passing a deflecting mass distribution. Using MPI, ray_trace_ellipse may calculate deflection in parallel across network connected computers, such as cluster. The program physcalc calculates the gravitational lensing shear using the relationship of convergence and shear, described by a set of coupled partial differential equations.

[ascl:1712.007] SFoF: Friends-of-friends galaxy cluster detection algorithm

SFoF is a friends-of-friends galaxy cluster detection algorithm that operates in either spectroscopic or photometric redshift space. The linking parameters, both transverse and along the line-of-sight, change as a function of redshift to account for selection effects.

[ascl:1712.006] Nyx: Adaptive mesh, massively-parallel, cosmological simulation code

Nyx code solves equations of compressible hydrodynamics on an adaptive grid hierarchy coupled with an N-body treatment of dark matter. The gas dynamics in Nyx use a finite volume methodology on an adaptive set of 3-D Eulerian grids; dark matter is represented as discrete particles moving under the influence of gravity. Particles are evolved via a particle-mesh method, using Cloud-in-Cell deposition/interpolation scheme. Both baryonic and dark matter contribute to the gravitational field. In addition, Nyx includes physics for accurately modeling the intergalactic medium; in optically thin limits and assuming ionization equilibrium, the code calculates heating and cooling processes of the primordial-composition gas in an ionizing ultraviolet background radiation field.

[ascl:1712.005] draco: Analysis and simulation of drift scan radio data

draco analyzes transit radio data with the m-mode formalism. It is telescope agnostic, and is used as part of the analysis and simulation pipeline for the CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) telescope. It can simulate time stream data from maps of the sky (using the m-mode formalism) and add gain fluctuations and correctly correlated instrumental noise (i.e. Wishart distributed). Further, it can perform various cuts on the data and make maps of the sky from data using the m-mode formalism.

[ascl:1712.004] Bitshuffle: Filter for improving compression of typed binary data

Bitshuffle rearranges typed, binary data for improving compression; the algorithm is implemented in a python/C package within the Numpy framework. The library can be used alongside HDF5 to compress and decompress datasets and is integrated through the dynamically loaded filters framework. Algorithmically, Bitshuffle is closely related to HDF5's Shuffle filter except it operates at the bit level instead of the byte level. Arranging a typed data array in to a matrix with the elements as the rows and the bits within the elements as the columns, Bitshuffle "transposes" the matrix, such that all the least-significant-bits are in a row, etc. This transposition is performed within blocks of data roughly 8kB long; this does not in itself compress data, but rearranges it for more efficient compression. A compression library is necessary to perform the actual compression. This scheme has been used for compression of radio data in high performance computing.

[ascl:1712.003] Py-SPHViewer: Cosmological simulations using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

Py-SPHViewer visualizes and explores N-body + Hydrodynamics simulations. The code interpolates the underlying density field (or any other property) traced by a set of particles, using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) interpolation scheme, thus producing not only beautiful but also useful scientific images. Py-SPHViewer enables the user to explore simulated volumes using different projections. Py-SPHViewer also provides a natural way to visualize (in a self-consistent fashion) gas dynamical simulations, which use the same technique to compute the interactions between particles.

[ascl:1712.002] MPI_XSTAR: MPI-based parallelization of XSTAR program

MPI_XSTAR parallelizes execution of multiple XSTAR runs using Message Passing Interface (MPI). XSTAR (ascl:9910.008), part of the HEASARC's HEAsoft (ascl:1408.004) package, calculates the physical conditions and emission spectra of ionized gases. MPI_XSTAR invokes XSTINITABLE from HEASoft to generate a job list of XSTAR commands for given physical parameters. The job list is used to make directories in ascending order, where each individual XSTAR is spawned on each processor and outputs are saved. HEASoft's XSTAR2TABLE program is invoked upon the contents of each directory in order to produce table model FITS files for spectroscopy analysis tools.

[ascl:1712.001] KDUtils: Kinematic Distance Utilities

The Kinematic Distance utilities (KDUtils) calculate kinematic distances and kinematic distance uncertainties. The package includes methods to calculate "traditional" kinematic distances as well as a Monte Carlo method to calculate kinematic distances and uncertainties.

[ascl:1711.024] NOD3: Single dish reduction software

NOD3 processes and analyzes maps from single-dish observations affected by scanning effects from clouds, receiver instabilities, or radio-frequency interference. Its “basket-weaving” tool combines orthogonally scanned maps into a final map that is almost free of scanning effects. A restoration tool for dual-beam observations reduces the noise by a factor of about two compared to the NOD2 version. Combining single-dish with interferometer data in the map plane ensures the full recovery of the total flux density.

[ascl:1711.023] HBT+: Subhalo finder and merger tree builder

HBT+ is a hybrid subhalo finder and merger tree builder for cosmological simulations. It comes as an MPI edition that can be run on distributed clusters or shared memory machines and is MPI/OpenMP parallelized, and also as an OpenMP edition that can be run on shared memory machines and is only OpenMP parallelized. This version is more memory efficient than the MPI branch on shared memory machines, and is more suitable for analyzing zoomed-in simulations that are difficult to balance on distributed clusters. Both editions support hydro simulations with gas/stars.

[ascl:1711.022] HBT: Hierarchical Bound-Tracing

HBT is a Hierarchical Bound-Tracing subhalo finder and merger tree builder, for numerical simulations in cosmology. It tracks haloes from birth and continues to track them after mergers, finding self-bound structures as subhaloes and recording their merger histories as merger trees.

[ascl:1711.021] Bifrost: Stream processing framework for high-throughput applications

Bifrost is a stream processing framework that eases the development of high-throughput processing CPU/GPU pipelines. It is designed for digital signal processing (DSP) applications within radio astronomy. Bifrost uses a flexible ring buffer implementation that allows different signal processing blocks to be connected to form a pipeline. Each block may be assigned to a CPU core, and the ring buffers are used to transport data to and from blocks. Processing blocks may be run on either the CPU or GPU, and the ring buffer will take care of memory copies between the CPU and GPU spaces.

[ascl:1711.020] MARXS: Multi-Architecture Raytrace Xray mission Simulator

MARXS (Multi-Architecture-Raytrace-Xraymission-Simulator) simulates X-ray observatories. Primarily designed to simulate X-ray instruments on astronomical X-ray satellites and sounding rocket payloads, it can also be used to ray-trace experiments in the laboratory. MARXS performs polarization Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations from a source (astronomical or lab) through a collection of optical elements such as mirrors, baffles, and gratings to a detector.

[ascl:1711.019] SPIDERMAN: Fast code to simulate secondary transits and phase curves

SPIDERMAN calculates exoplanet phase curves and secondary eclipses with arbitrary surface brightness distributions in two dimensions. The code uses a geometrical algorithm to solve exactly the area of sections of the disc of the planet that are occulted by the star. Approximately 1000 models can be generated per second in typical use, which makes making Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses practicable. The code is modular and allows comparison of the effect of multiple different brightness distributions for a dataset.

[ascl:1711.018] LExTeS: Link Extraction and Testing Suite

LExTeS (Link Extraction and Testing Suite) extracts hyperlinks from PDF documents, tests the extracted links to see which are broken, and tabulates the results. Though written to support a particular set of PDF documents, the dataset and scripts can be edited for use on other documents.

[ascl:1711.017] FATS: Feature Analysis for Time Series

FATS facilitates and standardizes feature extraction for time series data; it quickly and efficiently calculates a compilation of many existing light curve features. Users can characterize or analyze an astronomical photometric database, though this library is not necessarily restricted to the astronomical domain and can also be applied to any kind of time series data.

[ascl:1711.016] Thindisk: Protoplanetary disk model

Thindisk computes the line emission from a geometrically thin protoplanetary disk. It creates a datacube in FITS format that can be processed with a data reduction package (such as GILDAS, ascl:1305.010) to produce synthetic images and visibilities. These synthetic data can be compared with observations to determine the properties (e.g. central mass or inclination) of an observed disk. The disk is assumed to be in Keplerian rotation at a radius lower than the centrifugal radius (which can be set to a large value, for a purely Keplerian disk), and in infall with rotation beyond the centrifugal radius.

[ascl:1711.015] rac-2d: Thermo-chemical for modeling water vapor formation in protoplanetary disks

rec-2d models the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks. Given a distribution of gas and dust, rac-2d first solves the dust temperature distribution with a Monte Carlo method and then solves the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. Although the geometry is symmetric with respect to rotation around the central axis and reflection about the midplane, the photon propagation is done in full three dimensions. After establishing the dust temperature distribution, the disk chemistry is evolved for 1 Myr; the heating and cooling processes are coupled with chemistry, allowing the gas temperature to be evolved in tandem with chemistry based on the heating and cooling rates.

[ascl:1711.014] Gammapy: Python toolbox for gamma-ray astronomy

Gammapy analyzes gamma-ray data and creates sky images, spectra and lightcurves, from event lists and instrument response information; it can also determine the position, morphology and spectra of gamma-ray sources. It is used to analyze data from H.E.S.S., Fermi-LAT, and the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA).

[ascl:1711.013] HO-CHUNK: Radiation Transfer code

HO-CHUNK calculates radiative equilibrium temperature solution, thermal and PAH/vsg emission, scattering and polarization in protostellar geometries. It is useful for computing spectral energy distributions (SEDs), polarization spectra, and images.

[ascl:1711.012] megaman: Manifold Learning for Millions of Points

megaman is a scalable manifold learning package implemented in python. It has a front-end API designed to be familiar to scikit-learn but harnesses the C++ Fast Library for Approximate Nearest Neighbors (FLANN) and the Sparse Symmetric Positive Definite (SSPD) solver Locally Optimal Block Precodition Gradient (LOBPCG) method to scale manifold learning algorithms to large data sets. It is designed for researchers and as such caches intermediary steps and indices to allow for fast re-computation with new parameters.

[ascl:1711.011] galkin: Milky Way rotation curve data handler

galkin is a compilation of kinematic measurements tracing the rotation curve of our Galaxy, together with a tool to treat the data. The compilation is optimized to Galactocentric radii between 3 and 20 kpc and includes the kinematics of gas, stars and masers in a total of 2780 measurements collected from almost four decades of literature. The user-friendly software provided selects, treats and retrieves the data of all source references considered. This tool is especially designed to facilitate the use of kinematic data in dynamical studies of the Milky Way with various applications ranging from dark matter constraints to tests of modified gravity.

[ascl:1711.010] galstreams: Milky Way streams footprint library and toolkit

galstreams provides a compilation of spatial information for known stellar streams and overdensities in the Milky Way and includes Python tools for visualizing them. ASCII tables are also provided for quick viewing of the stream's footprints using TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010).

[ascl:1711.009] Lightning: SED Fitting Package

Lightning is a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting procedure that quickly and reliably recovers star formation history (SFH) and extinction parameters. The SFH is modeled as discrete steps in time. The code consists of a fully vectorized inversion algorithm to determine SFH step intensities and combines this with a grid-based approach to determine three extinction parameters.

[ascl:1711.008] clustep: Initial conditions for galaxy cluster halo simulations

clustep generates a snapshot in GADGET-2 (ascl:0003.001) format containing a galaxy cluster halo in equilibrium; this snapshot can also be read in RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) using the DICE patch. The halo is made of a dark matter component and a gas component, with the latter representing the ICM. Each of these components follows a Dehnen density profile, with gamma=0 or gamma=1. If gamma=1, then the profile corresponds to a Hernquist profile.

[ascl:1711.007] galstep: Initial conditions for spiral galaxy simulations

galstep generates initial conditions for disk galaxy simulations with GADGET-2 (ascl:0003.001), RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) and GIZMO (ascl:1410.003), including a stellar disk, a gaseous disk, a dark matter halo and a stellar bulge. The first two components follow an exponential density profile, and the last two a Dehnen density profile with gamma=1 by default, corresponding to a Hernquist profile.

[ascl:1711.006] RGW: Goodman-Weare Affine-Invariant Sampling

RGW is a lightweight R-language implementation of the affine-invariant Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling method of Goodman & Weare (2010). The implementation is based on the description of the python package emcee (ascl:1303.002).

[ascl:1711.005] correlcalc: Two-point correlation function from redshift surveys

correlcalc calculates two-point correlation function (2pCF) of galaxies/quasars using redshift surveys. It can be used for any assumed geometry or Cosmology model. Using BallTree algorithms to reduce the computational effort for large datasets, it is a parallelised code suitable for running on clusters as well as personal computers. It takes redshift (z), Right Ascension (RA) and Declination (DEC) data of galaxies and random catalogs as inputs in form of ascii or fits files. If random catalog is not provided, it generates one of desired size based on the input redshift distribution and mangle polygon file (in .ply format) describing the survey geometry. It also calculates different realisations of (3D) anisotropic 2pCF. Optionally it makes healpix maps of the survey providing visualization.

[ascl:1711.004] BayesVP: Full Bayesian Voigt profile fitting

BayesVP offers a Bayesian approach for modeling Voigt profiles in absorption spectroscopy. The code fits the absorption line profiles within specified wavelength ranges and generates posterior distributions for the column density, Doppler parameter, and redshifts of the corresponding absorbers. The code uses publicly available efficient parallel sampling packages to sample posterior and thus can be run on parallel platforms. BayesVP supports simultaneous fitting for multiple absorption components in high-dimensional parameter space. The package includes additional utilities such as explicit specification of priors of model parameters, continuum model, Bayesian model comparison criteria, and posterior sampling convergence check.

[ascl:1711.003] FTbg: Background removal using Fourier Transform

FTbg performs Fourier transforms on FITS images and separates low- and high-spatial frequency components by a user-specified cut. Both components are then inverse Fourier transformed back to image domain. FTbg can remove large-scale background/foreground emission in many astrophysical applications. FTbg has been designed to identify and remove Galactic background emission in Herschel/Hi-GAL continuum images, but it is applicable to any other (e.g., Planck) images when background/foreground emission is a concern.

[ascl:1711.002] inhomog: Biscale kinematical backreaction analytical evolution

The inhomog library provides Raychaudhuri integration of cosmological domain-wise average scale factor evolution using an analytical formula for kinematical backreaction Q_D evolution. The inhomog main program illustrates biscale examples. The library routine lib/Omega_D_precalc.c is callable by RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) using the RAMSES extension ramses-scalav.

[ascl:1711.001] SpcAudace: Spectroscopic processing and analysis package of Audela software

SpcAudace processes long slit spectra with automated pipelines and performs astrophysical analysis of the latter data. These powerful pipelines do all the required steps in one pass: standard preprocessing, masking of bad pixels, geometric corrections, registration, optimized spectrum extraction, wavelength calibration and instrumental response computation and correction. Both high and low resolution long slit spectra are managed for stellar and non-stellar targets. Many types of publication-quality figures can be easily produced: pdf and png plots or annotated time series plots. Astrophysical quantities can be derived from individual or large amount of spectra with advanced functions: from line profile characteristics to equivalent width and periodogram. More than 300 documented functions are available and can be used into TCL scripts for automation. SpcAudace is based on Audela open source software.

[ascl:1710.024] pred_loggs: Predicting individual galaxy G/S probability distributions

pred_loggs models the entire PGF probability density field, enabling iterative statistical modeling of upper limits and prediction of full G/S probability distributions for individual galaxies.

[ascl:1710.023] LIMEPY: Lowered Isothermal Model Explorer in PYthon

LIMEPY solves distribution function (DF) based lowered isothermal models. It solves Poisson's equation used on input parameters and offers fast solutions for isotropic/anisotropic, single/multi-mass models, normalized DF values, density and velocity moments, projected properties, and generates discrete samples.

[ascl:1710.022] galario: Gpu Accelerated Library for Analyzing Radio Interferometer Observations

The galario library exploits the computing power of modern graphic cards (GPUs) to accelerate the comparison of model predictions to radio interferometer observations. It speeds up the computation of the synthetic visibilities given a model image (or an axisymmetric brightness profile) and their comparison to the observations.

[ascl:1710.021] OSIRIS Toolbox: OH-Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph pipeline

OSIRIS Toolbox reduces data for the Keck OSIRIS instrument, an integral field spectrograph that works with the Keck Adaptive Optics System. It offers real-time reduction of raw frames into cubes for display and basic analysis. In this real-time mode, it takes about one minute for a preliminary data cube to appear in the “quicklook” display package. The reduction system also includes a growing set of final reduction steps including correction of telluric absorption and mosaicing of multiple cubes.

[ascl:1710.020] PSPLINE: Princeton Spline and Hermite cubic interpolation routines

PSPLINE is a collection of Spline and Hermite interpolation tools for 1D, 2D, and 3D datasets on rectilinear grids. Spline routines give full control over boundary conditions, including periodic, 1st or 2nd derivative match, or divided difference-based boundary conditions on either end of each grid dimension. Hermite routines take the function value and derivatives at each grid point as input, giving back a representation of the function between grid points. Routines are provided for creating Hermite datasets, with appropriate boundary conditions applied. The 1D spline and Hermite routines are based on standard methods; the 2D and 3D spline or Hermite interpolation functions are constructed from 1D spline or Hermite interpolation functions in a straightforward manner. Spline and Hermite interpolation functions are often much faster to evaluate than other representations using e.g. Fourier series or otherwise involving transcendental functions.

[ascl:1710.019] GASOLINE: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code

Gasoline solves the equations of gravity and hydrodynamics in astrophysical problems, including simulations of planets, stars, and galaxies. It uses an SPH method that features correct mixing behavior in multiphase fluids and minimal artificial viscosity. This method is identical to the SPH method used in the ChaNGa code (ascl:1105.005), allowing users to extend results to problems requiring >100,000 cores. Gasoline uses a fast, memory-efficient O(N log N) KD-Tree to solve Poisson's Equation for gravity and avoids artificial viscosity in non-shocking compressive flows.

[ascl:1710.018] FITSFH: Star Formation Histories

FITSFH derives star formation histories from photometry of resolved stellar populations by populating theoretical isochrones according to a chosen stellar initial mass function (IMF) and searching for the linear combination of isochrones with different ages and metallicities that best matches the data. In comparing the synthetic and real data, observational errors and incompleteness are taken into account, and a rudimentary treatment of the effect of unresolved binaries is also implemented. The code also allows for an age-dependent range of extinction values to be included in the modelling.

[ascl:1710.017] ATLAS9: Model atmosphere program with opacity distribution functions

ATLAS9 computes model atmospheres using a fixed set of pretabulated opacities, allowing one to work on huge numbers of stars and interpolate in large grids of models to determine parameters quickly. The code works with two different sets of opacity distribution functions (ODFs), one with “big” wavelength intervals covering the whole spectrum and the other with 1221 “little” wavelength intervals covering the whole spectrum. The ODFs use a 12-step representation; the radiation field is computed starting with the highest step and working down. If a lower step does not matter because the line opacity is small relative to the continuum at all depths, all the lower steps are lumped together and not computed to save time.

[ascl:1710.016] LGMCA: Local-Generalized Morphological Component Analysis

LGMCA (Local-Generalized Morphological Component Analysis) is an extension to GMCA (ascl:1710.015). Similarly to GMCA, it is a Blind Source Separation method which enforces sparsity. The novel aspect of LGMCA, however, is that the mixing matrix changes across pixels allowing LGMCA to deal with emissions sources which vary spatially. These IDL scripts compute the CMB map from WMAP and Planck data; running LGMCA on the WMAP9 temperature products requires the main script and a selection of mandatory files, algorithm parameters and map parameters.

[ascl:1710.015] GMCALab: Generalized Morphological Component Analysis

GMCALab solves Blind Source Separation (BSS) problems from multichannel/multispectral/hyperspectral data. In essence, multichannel data provide different observations of the same physical phenomena (e.g. multiple wavelengths), which are modeled as a linear combination of unknown elementary components or sources. Written as a set of Matlab toolboxes, it provides a generic framework that can be extended to tackle different matrix factorization problems.

[ascl:1710.014] GBART: Determination of the orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries

GBART is an improved version of the code for determining the orbital elements for spectroscopic binaries originally written by Bertiau & Grobben (1968).

[ascl:1710.013] Ramses-GPU: Second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver

RamsesGPU is a reimplementation of RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) which drops the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) features to optimize 3D uniform grid algorithms for modern graphics processor units (GPU) to provide an efficient software package for astrophysics applications that do not need AMR features but do require a very large number of integration time steps. RamsesGPU provides an very efficient C++/CUDA/MPI software implementation of a second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver for compressible hydrodynamics as a magnetohydrodynamics solver based on the constraint transport technique. Other useful modules includes static gravity, dissipative terms (viscosity, resistivity), and forcing source term for turbulence studies, and special care was taken to enhance parallel input/output performance by using state-of-the-art libraries such as HDF5 and parallel-netcdf.

[ascl:1710.012] FSFE: Fake Spectra Flux Extractor

The fake spectra flux extractor generates simulated quasar absorption spectra from a particle or adaptive mesh-based hydrodynamic simulation. It is implemented as a python module. It can produce both hydrogen and metal line spectra, if the simulation includes metals. The cloudy table for metal ionization fractions is included. Unlike earlier spectral generation codes, it produces absorption from each particle close to the sight-line individually, rather than first producing an average density in each spectral pixel, thus substantially preserving more of the small-scale velocity structure of the gas. The code supports both Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO.

[ascl:1710.011] mTransport: Two-point-correlation function calculator

mTransport computes the 2-point-correlation function of the curvature and tensor perturbations in multifield models of inflation in the presence of a curved field space. It is a Mathematica implementation of the transport method which encompasses scenarios with violations of slow-roll conditions and turns of the trajectory in field space. It can be used for an arbitrary mass spectrum, including massive modes, particle production and models with quasi-single-field dynamics.

[ascl:1710.010] PyTransport: Calculate inflationary correlation functions

PyTransport calculates the 2-point and 3-point function of inflationary perturbations produced during multi-field inflation. The core of PyTransport is C++ code which is automatically edited and compiled into a Python module once an inflationary potential is specified. This module can then be called to solve the background inflationary cosmology as well as the evolution of correlations of inflationary perturbations. PyTransport includes two additional modules written in Python, one to perform the editing and compilation, and one containing a suite of functions for common tasks such as looping over the core module to construct spectra and bispectra.

[ascl:1710.009] CppTransport: Two- and three-point function transport framework for inflationary cosmology

CppTransport solves the 2- and 3-point functions of the perturbations produced during an inflationary epoch in the very early universe. It is implemented for models with canonical kinetic terms, although the underlying method is quite general and could be scaled to handle models with a non-trivial field-space metric or an even more general non-canonical Lagrangian.

[ascl:1710.008] Binary: Accretion disk evolution

Binary computes the evolution of an accretion disc interacting with a binary system. It has been developed and used to study the coupled evolution of supermassive BH binaries and gaseous accretion discs.

[ascl:1710.007] FLAG: Exact Fourier-Laguerre transform on the ball

FLAG is a fast implementation of the Fourier-Laguerre Transform, a novel 3D transform exploiting an exact quadrature rule of the ball to construct an exact harmonic transform in 3D spherical coordinates. The angular part of the Fourier-Laguerre transform uses the MW sampling theorem and the exact spherical harmonic transform implemented in the SSHT code. The radial sampling scheme arises from an exact quadrature of the radial half-line using damped Laguerre polynomials. The radial transform can in fact be used to compute the spherical Bessel transform exactly, and the Fourier-Laguerre transform is thus closely related to the Fourier-Bessel transform.

[ascl:1710.006] MOSFiT: Modular Open-Source Fitter for Transients

MOSFiT (Modular Open-Source Fitter for Transients) downloads transient datasets from open online catalogs (e.g., the Open Supernova Catalog), generates Monte Carlo ensembles of semi-analytical light curve fits to those datasets and their associated Bayesian parameter posteriors, and optionally delivers the fitting results back to those same catalogs to make them available to the rest of the community. MOSFiT helps bridge the gap between observations and theory in time-domain astronomy; in addition to making the application of existing models and creation of new models as simple as possible, MOSFiT yields statistically robust predictions for transient characteristics, with a standard output format that includes all the setup information necessary to reproduce a given result.

[ascl:1710.005] SkyNet: Modular nuclear reaction network library

The general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. Any list of isotopes can be evolved and SkyNet supports various different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular, permitting new or existing physics, such as nuclear reactions or equations of state, to be easily added or modified.

[ascl:1710.004] SPIPS: Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars

SPIPS (Spectro-Photo-Interferometry of Pulsating Stars) combines radial velocimetry, interferometry, and photometry to estimate physical parameters of pulsating stars, including presence of infrared excess, color excess, Teff, and ratio distance/p-factor. The global model-based parallax-of-pulsation method is implemented in Python. Derived parameters have a high level of confidence; statistical precision is improved (compared to other methods) due to the large number of data taken into account, accuracy is improved by using consistent physical modeling and reliability of the derived parameters is strengthened by redundancy in the data.

[ascl:1710.003] EXOFASTv2: Generalized publication-quality exoplanet modeling code

EXOFASTv2 improves upon EXOFAST (ascl:1207.001) for exoplanet modeling. It uses a differential evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo code to fit an arbitrary number of transits (each with their own error scaling, normalization, TTV, and/or detrending parameters), an arbitrary number of RV sources (each with their own zero point and jitter), and an arbitrary number of planets, changing nothing but command line arguments and configuration files. The global model includes integrated isochrone and SED models to constrain the stellar properties and can accept priors on any fitted or derived quantities (e.g., parallax from Gaia). It is easily extensible to add additional effects or parameters.

[ascl:1710.002] rfpipe: Radio interferometric transient search pipeline

rfpipe supports Python-based analysis of radio interferometric data (especially from the Very Large Array) and searches for fast radio transients. This extends on the rtpipe library (ascl:1706.002) with new approaches to parallelization, acceleration, and more portable data products. rfpipe can run in standalone mode or be in a cluster environment.

[ascl:1710.001] vysmaw: Fast visibility stream muncher

The vysmaw client library facilitates the development of code for processes to tap into the fast visibility stream on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array correlator back-end InfiniBand network. This uses the vys protocol to allows loose coupling to clients that need to remotely access memory over an Infiniband network.

[ascl:1709.011] FLaapLUC: Fermi-LAT automatic aperture photometry light curve

Most high energy sources detected with Fermi-LAT are blazars, which are highly variable sources. High cadence long-term monitoring simultaneously at different wavelengths being prohibitive, the study of their transient activities can help shed light on our understanding of these objects. The early detection of such potentially fast transient events is the key for triggering follow-up observations at other wavelengths. FLaapLUC (Fermi-LAT automatic aperture photometry Light C↔Urve) uses the simple aperture photometry approach to effectively detect relative flux variations in a set of predefined sources and alert potential users. Such alerts can then be used to trigger observations of these sources with other facilities. The FLaapLUC pipeline is built on top of the Science Tools provided by the Fermi-LAT collaboration and quickly generates short- or long-term Fermi-LAT light curves.

[ascl:1709.010] MagIC: Fluid dynamics in a spherical shell simulator

MagIC simulates fluid dynamics in a spherical shell. It solves for the Navier-Stokes equation including Coriolis force, optionally coupled with an induction equation for Magneto-Hydro Dynamics (MHD), a temperature (or entropy) equation and an equation for chemical composition under both the anelastic and the Boussinesq approximations. MagIC uses either Chebyshev polynomials or finite differences in the radial direction and spherical harmonic decomposition in the azimuthal and latitudinal directions. The time-stepping scheme relies on a semi-implicit Crank-Nicolson for the linear terms of the MHD equations and a Adams-Bashforth scheme for the non-linear terms and the Coriolis force.

[ascl:1709.009] bmcmc: MCMC package for Bayesian data analysis

bmcmc is a general purpose Markov Chain Monte Carlo package for Bayesian data analysis. It uses an adaptive scheme for automatic tuning of proposal distributions. It can also handle Bayesian hierarchical models by making use of the Metropolis-Within-Gibbs scheme.

[ascl:1709.008] celerite: Scalable 1D Gaussian Processes in C++, Python, and Julia

celerite provides fast and scalable Gaussian Process (GP) Regression in one dimension and is implemented in C++, Python, and Julia. The celerite API is designed to be familiar to users of george and, like george, celerite is designed to efficiently evaluate the marginalized likelihood of a dataset under a GP model. This is then be used alongside a non-linear optimization or posterior inference library for the best results.

[ascl:1709.007] MSSC: Multi-Source Self-Calibration

Multi-Source Self-Calibration (MSSC) provides direction-dependent calibration to standard phase referencing. The code combines multiple faint sources detected within the primary beam to derive phase corrections. Each source has its CLEAN model divided into the visibilities which results in multiple point sources that are stacked in the uv plane to increase the S/N, thus permitting self-calibration. This process applies only to wide-field VLBI data sets that detect and image multiple sources within one epoch.

[ascl:1709.006] DCMDN: Deep Convolutional Mixture Density Network

Deep Convolutional Mixture Density Network (DCMDN) estimates probabilistic photometric redshift directly from multi-band imaging data by combining a version of a deep convolutional network with a mixture density network. The estimates are expressed as Gaussian mixture models representing the probability density functions (PDFs) in the redshift space. In addition to the traditional scores, the continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) and the probability integral transform (PIT) are applied as performance criteria. DCMDN is able to predict redshift PDFs independently from the type of source, e.g. galaxies, quasars or stars and renders pre-classification of objects and feature extraction unnecessary; the method is extremely general and allows the solving of any kind of probabilistic regression problems based on imaging data, such as estimating metallicity or star formation rate in galaxies.

[ascl:1709.005] DanIDL: IDL solutions for science and astronomy

DanIDL provides IDL functions and routines for many standard astronomy needs, such as searching for matching points between two coordinate lists of two-dimensional points where each list corresponds to a different coordinate space, estimating the full-width half-maximum (FWHM) and ellipticity of the PSF of an image, calculating pixel variances for a set of calibrated image data, and fitting a 3-parameter plane model to image data. The library also supplies astrometry, general image processing, and general scientific applications.

[ascl:1709.004] DOOp: DAOSPEC Output Optimizer pipeline

The DAOSPEC Output Optimizer pipeline (DOOp) runs efficient and convenient equivalent widths measurements in batches of hundreds of spectra. It uses a series of BASH scripts to work as a wrapper for the FORTRAN code DAOSPEC (ascl:1011.002) and uses IRAF (ascl:9911.002) to automatically fix some of the parameters that are usually set by hand when using DAOSPEC. This allows batch-processing of quantities of spectra that would be impossible to deal with by hand. DOOp was originally built for the large quantity of UVES and GIRAFFE spectra produced by the Gaia-ESO Survey, but just like DAOSPEC, it can be used on any high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum binned on a linear wavelength scale.

[ascl:1709.003] MeshLab: 3D triangular meshes processing and editing

MeshLab processes and edits 3D triangular meshes. It includes tools for editing, cleaning, healing, inspecting, rendering, texturing and converting meshes, and offers features for processing raw data produced by 3D digitization tools and devices and for preparing models for 3D printing.

[ascl:1709.002] PHANTOM: Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code

Phantom is a smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code focused on stellar, galactic, planetary, and high energy astrophysics. It is modular, and handles sink particles, self-gravity, two fluid and one fluid dust, ISM chemistry and cooling, physical viscosity, non-ideal MHD, and more. Its modular structure makes it easy to add new physics to the code.

[ascl:1709.001] SPHYNX: SPH hydrocode for subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities and strong shocks

SPHYNX addresses subsonic hydrodynamical instabilities and strong shocks; it is Newtonian, grounded on the Euler-Lagrange formulation of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics technique, and density based. SPHYNX uses an integral approach for estimating gradients, a flexible family of interpolators to suppress pairing instability, and incorporates volume elements to provides better partition of the unity.

[ascl:1708.030] GAMBIT: Global And Modular BSM Inference Tool

GAMBIT (Global And Modular BSM Inference Tool) performs statistical global fits of generic physics models using a wide range of particle physics and astrophysics data. Modules provide native simulations of collider and astrophysics experiments, a flexible system for interfacing external codes (the backend system), a fully featured statistical and parameter scanning framework, and additional tools for implementing and using hierarchical models.

[ascl:1708.029] iSEDfit: Bayesian spectral energy distribution modeling of galaxies

iSEDfit uses Bayesian inference to extract the physical properties of galaxies from their observed broadband photometric spectral energy distribution (SED). In its default mode, the inputs to iSEDfit are the measured photometry (fluxes and corresponding inverse variances) and a measurement of the galaxy redshift. Alternatively, iSEDfit can be used to estimate photometric redshifts from the input photometry alone.

After the priors have been specified, iSEDfit calculates the marginalized posterior probability distributions for the physical parameters of interest, including the stellar mass, star-formation rate, dust content, star formation history, and stellar metallicity. iSEDfit also optionally computes K-corrections and produces multiple "quality assurance" (QA) plots at each stage of the modeling procedure to aid in the interpretation of the prior parameter choices and subsequent fitting results. The software is distributed as part of the impro IDL suite.

[ascl:1708.028] ANA: Astrophysical Neutrino Anisotropy

ANA calculates the likelihood function for a model comprised of two components to the astrophysical neutrino flux detected by IceCube. The first component is extragalactic. Since point sources have not been found and there is increasing evidence that one source catalog cannot describe the entire data set, ANA models the extragalactic flux as isotropic. The second component is galactic. A variety of catalogs of interest are also provided. ANA takes the galactic contribution to be proportional to the matter density of the universe. The likelihood function has one free parameter fgal that is the fraction of the astrophysical flux that is galactic. ANA finds the best fit value of fgal and scans over 0<fgal<1.

[ascl:1708.027] empiriciSN: Supernova parameter generator

empiriciSN generates realistic supernova parameters given photometric observations of a potential host galaxy, based entirely on empirical correlations measured from supernova datasets. It is intended to be used to improve supernova simulation for DES and LSST. It is extendable such that additional datasets may be added in the future to improve the fitting algorithm or so that additional light curve parameters or supernova types may be fit.

[ascl:1708.026] XDGMM: eXtreme Deconvolution Gaussian Mixture Modeling

XDGMM uses Gaussian mixtures to do density estimation of noisy, heterogenous, and incomplete data using extreme deconvolution (XD) algorithms which is compatible with the scikit-learn machine learning methods. It implements both the astroML and Bovy et al. (2011) algorithms, and extends the BaseEstimator class from scikit-learn so that cross-validation methods work. It allows the user to produce a conditioned model if values of some parameters are known.

[ascl:1708.025] extinction-distances: Estimating distances to dark clouds

Extinction-distances uses the number of foreground stars and a Galactic model of the stellar distribution to estimate the distance to dark clouds. It exploits the relatively narrow range of intrinsic near-infrared colors of stars to separate foreground from background stars. An advantage of this method is that the distribution of stellar colors in the Galactic model need not be precisely correct, only the number density as a function of distance from the Sun.

[ascl:1708.024] ComEst: Completeness Estimator

ComEst calculates the completeness of CCD images conducted in astronomical observations saved in the FITS format. It estimates the completeness of the source finder SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) on the optical and near-infrared (NIR) imaging of point sources or galaxies as a function of flux (or magnitude) directly from the image itself. It uses PyFITS (ascl:1207.009) and GalSim (ascl:1402.009) to perform the end-to-end estimation of the completeness and can also estimate the purity of the source detection.

[ascl:1708.023] ExoSOFT: Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox

ExoSOFT provides orbital analysis of exoplanets and binary star systems. It fits any combination of astrometric and radial velocity data, and offers four parameter space exploration techniques, including MCMC. It is packaged with an automated set of post-processing and plotting routines to summarize results, and is suitable for performing orbital analysis during surveys with new radial velocity and direct imaging instruments.

[ascl:1708.022] Naima: Derivation of non-thermal particle distributions through MCMC spectral fitting

Naima computes non-thermal radiation from relativistic particle populations. It includes tools to perform MCMC fitting of radiative models to X-ray, GeV, and TeV spectra using emcee (ascl:1303.002), an affine-invariant ensemble sampler for Markov Chain Monte Carlo. Naima is an Astropy (ascl:1304.002) affiliated package.

[ascl:1708.020] 4DAO: DAOSPEC interface

4DAO launches DAOSPEC (ascl:1011.002) for a large sample of spectra. Written in Fortran, the software allows one to easily manage the input and output files of DAOSPEC, optimize the main DAOSPEC parameters, and mask specific spectral regions. It also provides suitable graphical tools to evaluate the quality of the solution and provides final, normalized, zero radial velocity spectra.

[ascl:1708.019] SINFONI Pipeline: Data reduction pipeline for the Very Large Telescope SINFONI spectrograph

The SINFONI pipeline reduces data from the Very Large Telescope's SINFONI (Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared) instrument. It can evaluate the detector linearity and generate a corresponding non linear pixel map, create a master dark and a hot-pixel map, a master flat and a map of pixels which have intensities greater than a given threshold. It can also compute the optical distortions and slitlets distances, and perform wavelength calibration, PSF, telluric standard and other science data reduction, and can coadd bad pixel maps, collapse a cube to an image over a given wavelength range, perform cube arithmetics, among other useful tasks.

[ascl:1708.018] CUTEX: CUrvature Thresholding EXtractor

CuTEx analyzes images in the infrared bands and extracts sources from complex backgrounds, particularly star-forming regions that offer the challenges of crowding, having a highly spatially variable background, and having no-psf profiles such as protostars in their accreting phase. The code is composed of two main algorithms, the first an algorithm for source detection, and the second for flux extraction. The code is originally written in IDL language and it was exported in the license free GDL language. CuTEx could be used in other bands or in scientific cases different from the native case.

This software is also available as an on-line tool from the Multi-Mission Interactive Archive web pages dedicated to the Herschel Observatory.

[ascl:1708.017] LCC: Light Curves Classifier

Light Curves Classifier uses data mining and machine learning to obtain and classify desired objects. This task can be accomplished by attributes of light curves or any time series, including shapes, histograms, or variograms, or by other available information about the inspected objects, such as color indices, temperatures, and abundances. After specifying features which describe the objects to be searched, the software trains on a given training sample, and can then be used for unsupervised clustering for visualizing the natural separation of the sample. The package can be also used for automatic tuning parameters of used methods (for example, number of hidden neurons or binning ratio).

Trained classifiers can be used for filtering outputs from astronomical databases or data stored locally. The Light Curve Classifier can also be used for simple downloading of light curves and all available information of queried stars. It natively can connect to OgleII, OgleIII, ASAS, CoRoT, Kepler, Catalina and MACHO, and new connectors or descriptors can be implemented. In addition to direct usage of the package and command line UI, the program can be used through a web interface. Users can create jobs for ”training” methods on given objects, querying databases and filtering outputs by trained filters. Preimplemented descriptors, classifier and connectors can be picked by simple clicks and their parameters can be tuned by giving ranges of these values. All combinations are then calculated and the best one is used for creating the filter. Natural separation of the data can be visualized by unsupervised clustering.

[ascl:1708.016] pyLCSIM: X-ray lightcurves simulator

pyLCSIM simulates X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models. Coherent signals can be specified as a sum of one or more sinusoids, each with its frequency, pulsed fraction and phase shift; or as a series of harmonics of a fundamental frequency (each with its pulsed fraction and phase shift). Power spectra can be simulated from a model of the power spectrum density (PSD) using as a template one or more of the built-in library functions. The user can also define his/her custom models. Models are additive.

[ascl:1708.021] KERTAP: Strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes

KERTAP computes the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles.

[ascl:1708.015] TWO-POP-PY: Two-population dust evolution model

TWO-POP-PY runs a two-population dust evolution model that follows the upper end of the dust size distribution and the evolution of the dust surface density profile and treats dust surface density, maximum particle size, small and large grain velocity, and fragmentation. It derives profiles that describe the dust-to-gas ratios and the dust surface density profiles well in protoplanetary disks, in addition to the radial flux by solid material rain out.

[ascl:1708.014] PACSman: IDL Suite for Herschel/PACS spectrometer data

PACSman provides an alternative for several reduction and analysis steps performed in HIPE (ascl:1111.001) on PACS spectroscopic data; it is written in IDL. Among the operations possible with it are transient correction, line fitting, map projection, and map analysis, and unchopped scan, chop/nod, and the decommissioned wavelength switching observation modes are supported.

[ascl:1708.013] GMM: Gaussian Mixture Modeling

GMM (Gaussian Mixture Modeling) tests the existence of bimodality in globular cluster color distributions. GMM uses three indicators to distinguish unimodal and bimodal distributions: the kurtosis of the distribution, the separation of the peaks, and the probability of obtaining the same χ2 from a unimodal distribution.

[ascl:1708.012] GANDALF: Gas AND Absorption Line Fitting

GANDALF (Gas AND Absorption Line Fitting) accurately separates the stellar and emission-line contributions to observed spectra. The IDL code includes reddening by interstellar dust and also returns formal errors on the position, width, amplitude and flux of the emission lines. Example wrappers that make use of pPXF (ascl:1210.002) to derive the stellar kinematics are included.

[ascl:1708.011] RM-CLEAN: RM spectra cleaner

RM-CLEAN reads in dirty Q and U cubes, generates rmtf based on the frequencies given in an ASCII file, and cleans the RM spectra following the algorithm given by Brentjens (2007). The output cubes contain the clean model components and the CLEANed RM spectra. The input cubes must be reordered with mode=312, and the output cubes will have the same ordering and thus must be reordered after being written to disk. RM-CLEAN runs as a MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) task and a Python wrapper is included with the code.

[ascl:1708.010] BAGEMASS: Bayesian age and mass estimates for transiting planet host stars

BAGEMASS calculates the posterior probability distribution for the mass and age of a star from its observed mean density and other observable quantities using a grid of stellar models that densely samples the relevant parameter space. It is written in Fortran and requires FITSIO (ascl:1010.001).

[ascl:1708.009] FIEStool: Automated data reduction for FIber-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES)

FIEStool automatically reduces data obtained with the FIber-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) at the Nordic Optical Telescope, a high-resolution spectrograph available on a stand-by basis, while also allowing the basic properties of the reduction to be controlled in real time by the user. It provides a Graphical User Interface and offers bias subtraction, flat-fielding, scattered-light subtraction, and specialized reduction tasks from the external packages IRAF (ascl:9911.002) and NumArray. The core of FIEStool is instrument-independent; the software, written in Python, could with minor modifications also be used for automatic reduction of data from other instruments.

[ascl:1708.008] ALCHEMIC: Advanced time-dependent chemical kinetics

ALCHEMIC solves chemical kinetics problems, including gas-grain interactions, surface reactions, deuterium fractionization, and transport phenomena and can model the time-dependent chemical evolution of molecular clouds, hot cores, corinos, and protoplanetary disks.

[ascl:1708.007] PBMC: Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo code for radiative transport in planetary atmospheres

PBMC (Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo) solves the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE) and can be applied to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. The code builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. In accounting for the polarization in the sampling of photon propagation directions and pre-conditioning the scattering matrix with information from the scattering matrices of prior (in the BMC integration order) photon collisions, PBMC avoids the unstable and biased solutions of classical BMC algorithms for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarizing media such as Rayleigh atmospheres.

[ascl:1708.006] DISORT: DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer

DISORT (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer) solves the problem of 1D scalar radiative transfer in a single optical medium, such as a planetary atmosphere. The code correctly accounts for multiple scattering by an isotropic or plane-parallel beam source, internal Planck sources, and reflection from a lower boundary. Provided that polarization effects can be neglected, DISORT efficiently calculates accurate fluxes and intensities at any user-specified angle and location within the user-specified medium.

[ascl:1708.005] STools: IDL Tools for Spectroscopic Analysis

STools contains a variety of simple tools for spectroscopy, such as reading an IRAF-formatted (multispec) echelle spectrum in FITS, measuring the wavelength of the center of a line, Gaussian convolution, deriving synthetic photometry from an input spectrum, and extracting and interpolating a MARCS model atmosphere (standard composition).

[ascl:1708.003] CRISPRED: CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter data reduction pipeline

CRISPRED reduces data from the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST). It performs fitting routines, corrects optical aberrations from atmospheric turbulence as well as from the optics, and compensates for inter-camera misalignments, field-dependent and time-varying instrumental polarization, and spatial variation in the detector gain and in the zero level offset (bias). It has an object-oriented IDL structure with computationally demanding routines performed in C subprograms called as dynamically loadable
modules (DLMs).

[ascl:1708.002] CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

[ascl:1708.001] ATOOLS: A command line interface to the AST library

The ATOOLS package of applications provides an interface to the AST library (ascl:1404.016), allowing quick experiments to be performed from the shell. It manipulates descriptions of coordinate frames and mappings in the form of AST objects and performs other functions, with each application within the package corresponding closely to one of the functions in the AST library.

[ascl:1707.007] swot: Super W Of Theta

SWOT (Super W Of Theta) computes two-point statistics for very large data sets, based on “divide and conquer” algorithms, mainly, but not limited to data storage in binary trees, approximation at large scale, parellelization (open MPI), and bootstrap and jackknife resampling methods “on the fly”. It currently supports projected and 3D galaxy auto and cross correlations, galaxy-galaxy lensing, and weighted histograms.

[ascl:1707.006] Gala: Galactic astronomy and gravitational dynamics

Gala is a Python package (and Astropy affiliated package) for Galactic astronomy and gravitational dynamics. The bulk of the package centers around implementations of gravitational potentials, numerical integration, nonlinear dynamics, and astronomical velocity transformations (i.e. proper motions). Gala uses the Astropy units and coordinates subpackages extensively to provide a clean, pythonic interface to these features but does any heavy-lifting in C and Cython for speed.

[ascl:1707.005] PyMOC: Multi-Order Coverage map module for Python

PyMOC manipulates Multi-Order Coverage (MOC) maps. It supports reading and writing the three encodings mentioned in the IVOA MOC recommendation: FITS, JSON and ASCII.

[ascl:1707.004] CCFpams: Atmospheric stellar parameters from cross-correlation functions

CCFpams allows the measurement of stellar temperature, metallicity and gravity within a few seconds and in a completely automated fashion. Rather than performing comparisons with spectral libraries, the technique is based on the determination of several cross-correlation functions (CCFs) obtained by including spectral features with different sensitivity to the photospheric parameters. Literature stellar parameters of high signal-to-noise (SNR) and high-resolution HARPS spectra of FGK Main Sequence stars are used to calibrate the stellar parameters as a function of CCF areas.

[ascl:1707.003] pyaneti: Multi-planet radial velocity and transit fitting

Pyaneti is a multi-planet radial velocity and transit fit software. The code uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods with a Bayesian approach and a parallelized ensemble sampler algorithm in Fortran which makes the code fast. It creates posteriors, correlations, and ready-to-publish plots automatically, and handles circular and eccentric orbits. It is capable of multi-planet fitting and handles stellar limb darkening, systemic velocities for multiple instruments, and short and long cadence data, and offers additional capabilities.

[ascl:1707.002] SASRST: Semi-Analytic Solutions for 1-D Radiative Shock Tubes

SASRST, a small collection of Python scripts, attempts to reproduce the semi-analytical one-dimensional equilibrium and non-equilibrium radiative shock tube solutions of Lowrie & Rauenzahn (2007) and Lowrie & Edwards (2008), respectively. The included code calculates the solution for a given set of input parameters and also plots the results using Matplotlib. This software was written to provide validation for numerical radiative shock tube solutions produced by a radiation hydrodynamics code.

[ascl:1707.001] HRM: HII Region Models

HII Region Models fits HII region models to observed radio recombination line and radio continuum data. The algorithm includes the calculations of departure coefficients to correct for non-LTE effects. HII Region Models has been used to model star formation in the nucleus of IC 342.

[ascl:1706.012] KeplerSolver: Kepler equation solver

KeplerSolver solves Kepler's equation for arbitrary epoch and eccentricity, using continued fractions. It is written in C and its speed is nearly the same as the SWIFT routines, while achieving machine precision. It comes with a test program to demonstrate usage.

[ascl:1706.011] PyPulse: PSRFITS handler

PyPulse handles PSRFITS files and performs subsequent analyses on pulse profiles.

[ascl:1706.010] EXOSIMS: Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator

EXOSIMS generates and analyzes end-to-end simulations of space-based exoplanet imaging missions. The software is built up of interconnecting modules describing different aspects of the mission, including the observatory, optical system, and scheduler (encoding mission rules) as well as the physical universe, including the assumed distribution of exoplanets and their physical and orbital properties. Each module has a prototype implementation that is inherited by specific implementations for different missions concepts, allowing for the simulation of widely variable missions.

[submitted] KERN

KERN is a bi-annually released set of radio astronomical software packages. It should contain most of the standard tools that a radio astronomer needs to work with radio telescope data. The goal of KERN to is to save time and frustration in setting up of scientific pipelines, and to assist in achieving scientific reproducibility.

[submitted] Kliko - The Scientific Compute Container Format

We present Kliko, a Docker based container specification for running one or multiple related compute jobs. The key concepts of Kliko is the encapsulation of data processing software into a container and the formalisation of the input, output and task parameters. Formalisation is realised by bundling a container with a Kliko file, which describes the IO and task parameters. This Kliko container can then be opened and run by a Kliko runner. The Kliko runner will parse the Kliko definition and gather the values for these parameters, for example by requesting user input or pre defined values in a script. Parameters can be various primitive types, for example float, int or the path to a file. This paper will also discuss the implementation of a support library named Kliko which can be used to create Kliko containers, parse Kliko definitions, chain Kliko containers in workflows using, for example, Luigi a workflow manager. The Kliko library can be used inside the container interact with the Kliko runner. Finally this paper will discuss two reference implementations based on Kliko: RODRIGUES, a web based Kliko container schedular and output visualiser specifically for astronomical data, and VerMeerKAT, a multi container workflow data reduction pipeline which is being used as a prototype pipeline for the commisioning of the MeerKAT radio telescope.

[ascl:1706.009] sick: Spectroscopic inference crank

sick infers astrophysical parameters from noisy observed spectra. Phenomena that can alter the data (e.g., redshift, continuum, instrumental broadening, outlier pixels) are modeled and simultaneously inferred with the astrophysical parameters of interest. This package relies on emcee (ascl:1303.002); it is best suited for situations where a grid of model spectra already exists, and one would like to infer model parameters given some data.

[ascl:1706.008] the-wizz: Clustering redshift estimation code

the-wizz clusters redshift estimates for any photometric unknown sample in a survey. The software is composed of two main parts: a pair finder and a pdf maker. The pair finder finds spatial pairs and stores the indices of all closer pairs around target reference objects in an output HDF5 data file. Users then query this data file using the indices of their unknown sample to produce an output clustering-z.

[ascl:1706.007] encube: Large-scale comparative visualization and analysis of sets of multidimensional data

Encube is a qualitative, quantitative and comparative visualization and analysis framework, with application to high-resolution, immersive three-dimensional environments and desktop displays, providing a capable visual analytics experience across the display ecology. Encube includes mechanisms for the support of: 1) interactive visual analytics of sufficiently large subsets of data; 2) synchronous and asynchronous collaboration; and 3) documentation of the discovery workflow. The framework is modular, allowing additional functionalities to be included as required.

[ascl:1706.006] GenPK: Power spectrum generator

GenPK generates the 3D matter power spectra for each particle species from a Gadget snapshot. Written in C++, it requires both FFTW3 and GadgetReader.

[ascl:1706.005] LMC: Logarithmantic Monte Carlo

LMC is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo engine in Python that implements adaptive Metropolis-Hastings and slice sampling, as well as the affine-invariant method of Goodman & Weare, in a flexible framework. It can be used for simple problems, but the main use case is problems where expensive likelihood evaluations are provided by less flexible third-party software, which benefit from parallelization across many nodes at the sampling level. The parallel/adaptive methods use communication through MPI, or alternatively by writing/reading files, and mostly follow the approaches pioneered by CosmoMC (ascl:1106.025).

[ascl:1706.004] Dark Sage: Semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution

DARK SAGE is a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation that focuses on detailing the structure and evolution of galaxies' discs. The code-base, written in C, is an extension of SAGE (ascl:1601.006) and maintains the modularity of SAGE. DARK SAGE runs on any N-body simulation with trees organized in a supported format and containing a minimum set of basic halo properties.

[ascl:1706.003] DaMaSCUS: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings

DaMaSCUS calculates the density and velocity distribution of dark matter (DM) at any detector of given depth and latitude to provide dark matter particle trajectories inside the Earth. Provided a strong enough DM-matter interaction, the particles scatter on terrestrial atoms and get decelerated and deflected. The resulting local modifications of the DM velocity distribution and number density can have important consequences for direct detection experiments, especially for light DM, and lead to signatures such as diurnal modulations depending on the experiment's location on Earth. The code involves both the Monte Carlo simulation of particle trajectories and generation of data as well as the data analysis consisting of non-parametric density estimation of the local velocity distribution functions and computation of direct detection event rates.

[ascl:1706.002] rtpipe: Searching for Fast Radio Transients in Interferometric Data

rtpipe (real-time pipeline) analyzes radio interferometric data with an emphasis on searching for transient or variable astrophysical sources. The package combines single-dish concepts such as dedispersion and filters with interferometric concepts, including images and the uv-plane. In contrast to time-domain data recorded with large single-dish telescopes, visibilities from interferometers can precisely localize sources anywhere in the entire field of view. rtpipe opens interferometers to the study of fast transient sky, including sources like pulsars, stellar flares, rotating radio transients, and fast radio bursts. Key portions of the search pipeline, such as image generation and dedispersion, have been accelerated. That, in combination with its multi-threaded, multi-node design, makes rtpipe capable of searching millisecond timescale data in real time on small compute clusters.

[ascl:1706.001] Exotrending: Fast and easy-to-use light curve detrending software for exoplanets

The simple, straightforward Exotrending code detrends exoplanet transit light curves given a light curve (flux versus time) and good ephemeris (epoch of first transit and orbital period). The code has been tested with Kepler and K2 light curves and should work with any other light curve.

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