ASCL.net

Astrophysics Source Code Library

Making codes discoverable since 1999

Browsing Codes

Results 1-100 of 3034 (2961 ASCL, 73 submitted)

Order
Title Date
 
Mode
Abstract Compact
Per Page
50100250All
[submitted] MGCosmoPop: modified gravity and cosmology with binary black holes population models

This code implements a hierarchical bayesian inference method for constraining the background cosmological history, in particular the Hubble constant, together with modified gravitational-wave propagation and binary black holes population models (mass, redshift and spin distributions) with gravitational-wave data. It includes support for loading and analysing data from the GWTC-3 catalog as well as for generating injections to evaluate selection effects, and features a module to run in parallel on clusters.

[submitted] Eventdisplay - An Analysis and Reconstruction Package for Ground-based Gamma-ray Astronomy

Eventdisplay is a reconstruction and analysis pipline for data of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT). It has been primarily developed for VERITAS and CTA analysis.

The package consists of several analysis tools:

1. `evndisp`: calibrate and parametrize images, event reconstruction, stereo analysis
2. `trainTMVAforAngularReconstruction`: train boosted decision trees for direction and energy reconstruction
3. `mscw_energy`: fill and use lookup tables for mean scaled with and lenght calculation, energy reconstruction, stereo reconstruction
4. `trainTMVAforGammaHadronSeparation`: train boosted decision trees for gamma/hadron separation
5. `makeEffectiveArea`: calculation of the instrument response functions (effective areas, angular point-spread function, energy resolution)
6. `makeRadialAcceptance`: calculation of radial camera acceptance from data files
7. `anasum`: analysis to calculate sky maps and spectral energy distribution
8. `libVAnaSum`: shared library tools (to be used with [ROOT](https://root.cern/) to e.g., plot instrument response function, spectral energy distributions, light curves, sky maps

[submitted] PyMCCF: Python Modernized Cross Correlation Function for reverberation mapping studies

PyMCCF emulates a PASCAL program written by V.L.Oknyansky for use with reverberation mapping (RM). The code is updated version of the Gaskell & Spark (1986) method ICCF.
The code cross correlates two light curves that are unevenly sampled using linear interpolation and measures the peak and centroid of the cross-correlation function. The most
significant improvement of the code is using special parametor MAX which reduces the number of used interpolated pointes just to those whih not further from nearest real one than
the MAX. This way gives opportunities significantly reduce noise from interpolation errors. Also in ICCF were introduced constant values at the time space before the first
and after the last points of the sets. The number of interpolated pairs in the ICCF were forever the same for each time delay, but sure the signal/noise ratio drops down as the
time delay grows. In our code the number correlated pairs of data are not the same for each time delay. In the PyCCD version of the code published by Sun et al. also are used
different numbers of pair for each time delay due to not using any extrapolatation of the data sets, but in the version are used interpolated points in the big gaps
at data sets which are very common for astronomical data. So we were based on the PyCCF code with some correction which give us opportunity to introduce the new parameter MAX.
Additionally we preferer to interpolated just the best one from the 2 data sets used for RM. The method of getting errors for RM in our code PyMCCF were not changed
and is exactly the same as in PyCCF. So it is possible, in addition, to run Monto Carlo iterations using flux randomization and random subset selection (RSS) to produce
cross-correlation centroid distributions to estimate the uncertainties in the cross correlation results.

[submitted] GWFAST: a Fisher information matrix python package for gravitational-wave detectors

GWFAST is a Python code for forecasting the signal-to-noise ratios and parameter estimation capabilities of networks of gravitational-wave detectors, based on the Fisher information matrix approximation. It is designed for applications to third-generation gravitational-wave detectors.
It is based on Automatic Differentiation, which makes use of the library JAX. This allows efficient parallelization and numerical accuracy. The code includes a module for parallel computation on clusters.

[ascl:2211.020] EXCEED-DM: EXtended Calculation of Electronic Excitations for Direct detection of Dark Matter

EXCEED-DM (EXtended Calculation of Electronic Excitations for Direct detection of Dark Matter) provides a complete framework for computing DM-electron interaction rates. Given an electronic configuration, EXCEED-DM computes the relevant electronic matrix elements, then particle physics specific rates from these matrix elements. This allows for separation between approximations regarding the electronic state configuration, and the specific calculation being performed.

[ascl:2211.019] APERO: A PipelinE to Reduce Observations

APERO (A PipelinE to Reduce Observations) performs data reduction for the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope's near-infrared spectropolarimeter SPIRou and offers different recipes or modules for performing specific tasks. APERO can individually run recipes or process a set of files, such as cleaning a data file of detector effects, collecting all dark files and creating a master dark image to use for correction, and creating a bad pixel mask for identifying and dealing with bad pixels. It can extract out flat images to measure the blaze and produced blaze correction and flat correction images, extract dark frames to provide correction for the thermal background after extraction of science or calibration frames, and correct extracted files for leakage coming from a FP (for OBJ_FP files only). It can also take a hot star and calculate telluric transmission, and then use the telluric transmission to calculate principle components (PCA) for correcting input images of atmospheric absorption, among many other tasks.

[ascl:2211.018] ODNet: Asteroid occultation detection convolutional neural network

ODNet uses a convolutional neural network to examine frames of a given observation, using the flux of a targeted star along time, to detect occultations. This is particularly useful to reliably detect asteroid occultations for the Unistellar Network, which consists of 10,000 digital telescopes owned by citizen scientists that is regularly used to record asteroid occultations. ODNet is not costly in term of computing power, opening the possibility for embedding the code on the telescope directly. ODNet's models were developed and trained using TensorFlow version 2.4.

[ascl:2211.017] BiGONLight: Bi-local Geodesic Operators framework for Numerical Light propagation

BiGONLight (Bi-local geodesic operators framework for numerical light propagation) encodes the Bi-local Geodesic Operators formalism (BGO) to study light propagation in the geometric optics regime in General Relativity. The parallel transport equations, the optical tidal matrix, and the geodesic deviation equations for the bilocal operators are expressed in 3+1 form and encoded in BiGONLight as Mathematica functions. The bilocal operators are used to obtain all possible optical observables by combining them with the observer and emitter four-velocities and four-accelerations. The user can choose the position of the source and the observer anywhere along the null geodesic with any four-velocities and four-accelerations.

[ascl:2211.016] Korg: 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium stellar spectral synthesis

Korg computes stellar spectra from 1D model atmospheres and linelists assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and implements both plane-parallel and spherical radiative transfer. The code is generally faster than other codes, and is compatible with automatic differentiation libraries and easily extensible, making it ideal for statistical inference and parameter estimation applied to large data sets.

[ascl:2211.015] H-FISTA: Phase retrieval for pulsar spectroscopy

H-FISTA (Hierarchical Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm) retrieves the phases of the wavefield from intensity measurements for pulsar spectroscopy. The code accepts input data in ASCII format as produced by PSRchive's (ascl:1105.014) psrflux function, a FITS file, or a pickle. If using a notebook, any custom reader can be used as long as the data ends up in a NumPy array. H-FISTA obtains sparse models of the wavefield in a hierarchical approach with progressively increasing depth. Once the tail of the noise distribution is reached, the hierarchy terminates with a final unregularized optimization, resulting in a fully dense model of the complex wavefield that permits the discovery of faint signals by appropriate averaging.

[ascl:2211.014] PDFchem: Average abundance of species from Av-PDFs

PDFchem models the cold ISM at moderate and large scales using functions connecting the quantities of the local and the observed visual extinctions and the local number density with probability density functions. For any given observed visual extinction sampled with thousands of clouds, the algorithm instantly computes the average abundances of the most important species and performs radiative transfer calculations to estimate the average emission of the most commonly observed lines.

[ascl:2211.013] 2DFFTUtils: 2DFFT Utilities implementation

The Python module 2DFFTUtils implements tasks associated with measuring spiral galaxy pitch angle with 2DFFT (ascl:1608.015). Since most of the 2DFFT utilities are implemented in one place, it makes preparing images for 2DFFT and dealing with 2DFFT data interactively or in scripts event easier.

[ascl:2211.012] gsf: Grism SED Fitting package

gsf fits photometric data points, simultaneously with grism spectra if provided, to get posterior probability of galaxy physical properties, such as stellar mass, dust attenuation, metallicity, as well as star formation and metallicity enrichment histories. Designed for extra-galactic science, this flexible, python-based SED fitting code involves a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) process, and may take more time (depending on the number of parameters and length of MCMC chains) than other SED fitting codes based on chi-square minimization.

[ascl:2211.011] fastSHT: Fast Spherical Harmonic Transforms

fastSHT performs spherical harmonic transforms on a large number of spherical maps. It converts massive SHT operations to a BLAS level 3 problem and uses the highly optimized matrix multiplication toolkit to accelerate the computation. GPU acceleration is supported and can be very effective. The core code is written in Fortran, but a Python wrapper is provided and recommended.

[ascl:2211.010] BlackJAX: Library of samplers for JAX

BlackJAX is a sampling library designed for ease of use, speed, and modularity and works on CPU as well as GPU. It is not a probabilistic programming library (PLL), though it integrates well with PPLs as long as they can provide a (potentially unnormalized) log-probability density function compatible with JAX. BlackJAX is written in pure Python and depends on XLA via JAX (ascl:2111.002). It can be used by those who have a logpdf and need a sampler or need more than a general-purpose sampler. It is also useful for building a sample on GPU and for users who want to learn how sampling algorithms work.

[ascl:2211.009] ovejero: Bayesian neural network inference of strong gravitational lenses

ovejero conducts hierarchical inference of strongly-lensed systems with Bayesian neural networks. It requires lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012) and fastell (ascl:9910.003) to run lens models with elliptical mass distributions. The code trains Bayesian Neural Networks (BNNs) to predict posteriors on strong gravitational lensing images and can integrate with forward modeling tools in lenstronomy to allow comparison between BNN outputs and more traditional methods. ovejero also provides hierarchical inference tools to generate population parameter estimates and unbiased posteriors on independent test sets.

[ascl:2211.008] pmclib: Population Monte Carlo library

The Population Monte-Carlo (PMC) sampling code pmclib performs fast end efficient parallel iterative importance sampling to compute integrals over the posterior including the Bayesian evidence.

[ascl:2211.007] mgcnn: Standard and modified gravity (MG) cosmological models classifier

mgcnn is a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) architecture for classifying standard and modified gravity (MG) cosmological models based on the weak-lensing convergence maps they produce. It is implemented in Keras using TensorFlow as the backend. The code offers three options for the noise flag, which correspond to noise standard deviations, and additional options for the number of training iterations and epochs. Confusion matrices and evaluation metrics (loss function and validation accuracy) are saved as numpy arrays in the generated output/ directory after each iteration.

[ascl:2211.006] baobab: Training data generator for hierarchically modeling strong lenses with Bayesian neural networks

baobab generates images of strongly-lensed systems, given some configurable prior distributions over the parameters of the lens and light profiles as well as configurable assumptions about the instrument and observation conditions. Wrapped around lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012), baobab supports prior distributions ranging from artificially simple to empirical. A major use case for baobab is the generation of training and test sets for hierarchical inference using Bayesian neural networks (BNNs); the code can generate the training and test sets using different priors.

[ascl:2211.005] unTimely_Catalog_explorer: A search and visualization tool for the unTimely Catalog

unTimely Catalog Explorer searches for and visualizes detections in the unTimely Catalog, a full-sky, time-domain catalog of detections based on WISE and NEOWISE image data acquired between 2010 and 2020. The tool searches the catalog by coordinates to create finder charts for each epoch with overplotted catalog positions and light curves using the unTimely photometry, to overplot these light curves with AllWISE multi-epoch and NEOWISE-R single exposure (L1b) photometry, and to create image blinks with overlaid catalog positions in GIF format.

[ascl:2211.004] PAHDecomp: Decomposing the mid-IR spectra of extremely obscured galaxies

PAHDecomp models mid-infrared spectra of galaxies; it is based on the popular PAHFIT code (ascl:1210.009). In contrast to PAHFIT, this model decomposes the continuum into a star-forming component and an obscured nuclear component based on Bayesian priors on the shape of the star-forming component (using templates + prior on extinction), making this tool ideally suited for modeling the spectra of heavily obscured galaxies. PAHDecomp successfully recovers properties of Compact Obscured Nuclei (CONs) where the inferred nuclear optical depth strongly correlates with the surface brightness of HCN-vib emission in the millimeter. This is currently set up to run on the short low modules of Spitzer IRS data (5.2 - 14.2 microns) but will be ideal for JWST/MIRI MRS data in the future.

[ascl:2211.003] AMBER: Abundance Matching Box for the Epoch of Reionization

AMBER (Abundance Matching Box for the Epoch of Reionization) models the cosmic dawn. The semi-numerical code allows users to directly specify the reionization history through the redshift midpoint, duration, and asymmetry input parameters. The reionization process is further controlled through the minimum halo mass for galaxy formation and the radiation mean free path for radiative transfer. The parallelized code is over four orders of magnitude faster than radiative transfer simulations and will efficiently enable large-volume models, full-sky mock observations, and parameter-space studies.

[ascl:2211.002] KC: Analytical propagator with collision detection for Keplerian systems

The analytic propagator Kepler-Collisions calculates collisions for Keplerian systems. The algorithm maintains a list of collision possibilities and jumps from one collision to the next; since collisions are rare in astronomical scales, jumping from collision to collision and calculating each one is more efficient than calculating all the time steps that are between collisions.

[ascl:2211.001] PTAfast: PTA correlations from stochastic gravitational wave background

PTAfast calculates the overlap reduction function in Pulsar Timing Array produced by the stochastic gravitational wave background for arbitrary polarizations, propagation velocities, and pulsar distances.

[ascl:2210.030] cuvarbase: fast period finding utilities for GPUs

cuvarbase provides a Python library for performing period finding (Lomb-Scargle, Phase Dispersion Minimization, Conditional Entropy, Box-least squares) on astronomical time-series datasets. Speedups over CPU implementations depend on the algorithm, dataset, and GPU capabilities but are typically ~1-2 orders of magnitude and are especially high for BLS and Lomb-Scargle.

[ascl:2210.029] paltas: Simulation-based inference on strong gravitational lensing systems

paltas conducts simulation-based inference on strong gravitational lensing images. It builds on lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012) to create large datasets of strong lensing images with realistic low-mass halos, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observational effects, and galaxy light from HST's COSMOS field. paltas also includes the capability to easily train neural posterior estimators of the parameters of the lensing system and to run hierarchical inference on test populations.

[ascl:2210.028] CK: Cloud modeling and removal

Cloud Killer recovers surface albedo maps by using reflected light photometry to map the clouds and surface of unresolved exoplanets. For light curves with negligible photometric uncertainties, the minimal top-of-atmosphere albedo at a location is a good estimate of its surface albedo. On synthetic data, it shows little bias, good precision, and accuracy, but slightly underestimated uncertainties; exoplanets with large, changing cloud structures observed near quadrature phases are good candidates for Cloud Killer cloud removal.

[ascl:2210.027] LensingETC: Lensing Exposure Time Calculator

LensingETC optimizes observing strategies for multi-filter imaging campaigns of galaxy-scale strong lensing systems. It uses the lens modelling software lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012) to simulate and model mock imaging data, forecasts the lens model parameter uncertainties, and optimizes observing strategies.

[ascl:2210.026] PGOPHER: Rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra simulator

PGOPHER simulates and fits rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. It handles linear molecules and symmetric and asymmetric tops, including effects due to unpaired electrons and nuclear spin, with a separate mode for vibrational structure. The code performs many sorts of transitions, including Raman, multiphoton, and forbidden transitions. It can simulate multiple species and states simultaneously, including special effects such as perturbations and state dependent predissociation. Fitting can be to line positions, intensities, or band contours. PGOPHER uses a standard graphical user interface and makes comparison with, and fitting to, spectra from various sources easy. In addition to overlaying numerical spectra, it is also possible to overlay pictures from pdf files and even plate spectra to assist in checking that published constants are being used correctly.

[ascl:2210.025] tvguide: Observability by TESS

tvguide determines whether stars and galaxies are observable by TESS. It uses an object's right ascension and declination and estimates the pointing of TESS's cameras using predicted spacecraft ephemerides to determine whether and for how long the object is observable with TESS. tvguide returns a file with two columns, the first the minimum number of sectors the target is observable for and the second the maximum.

[ascl:2210.024] Faiss: Similarity search and clustering of dense vectors library

The Faiss library performs efficient similarity search and clustering of dense vectors. It contains algorithms that search in sets of vectors of any size, up to ones that possibly do not fit in RAM. It also contains supporting code for evaluation and parameter tuning. Faiss is written in C++ with complete wrappers for Python/numpy. Some of the most useful algorithms are implemented on the GPU.

[ascl:2210.023] BornRaytrace: Weak gravitational lensing effects simulator

BornRaytrace uses neural data compression of weak lensing map summary statistics to simulate weak gravitational lensing effects. It can raytrace through overdensity Healpix maps to return a convergence map, include shear-kappa transformation on the full sphere, and also include intrinsic alignments (NLA model).

[ascl:2210.022] MCCD: Multi-CCD Point Spread Function Modelling

MCCD (Multi-CCD) generates a Point Spread Function (PSF) model based on stars observations in the field of view. After defining the MCCD model parameters and running and validating the training, the model can recover the PSF at any position in the field of view. Written in Python, MCCD also calculates various statistics and can plot a random test star and its model reconstruction.

[ascl:2210.021] SHEEP: Machine Learning pipeline for astronomy classification

The photometric redshift-aided classification pipeline SHEEP uses ensemble learning to classify astronomical sources into galaxies, quasars and stars. It uses tabular data and also allows the use of sparse data. The approach uses SDSS and WISE photometry, but SHEEP can also be used with other types of tabular data, such as radio fluxes or magnitudes.

[ascl:2210.020] ixpeobssim: Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer simulator and analyzer

The simulation and analysis framework ixpeobssim was specifically developed for the Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE). It produces realistic simulated observations, in the form of event lists in FITS format, that also contain a strict superset of the information included in the publicly released IXPE data products. The framework's core simulation capabilities are complemented by post-processing applications that support the spatial, spectral, and temporal models needed for analysis of typical polarized X-ray sources, allowing implementation of complex, polarization-aware analysis pipelines. Where applicable, the data formats are consistent with the common display and analysis tools used by the community, e.g., the binned count spectra can be fed into XSPEC (ascl:9910.005), along with the corresponding response functions, for doing standard spectral analysis. All ixpeobssim simulation and analysis tools are fully configurable via the command line.

[ascl:2210.019] POSYDON: Single and binary star population synthesis code

POSYDON (POpulation SYnthesis with Detailed binary-evolution simulatiONs) incorporates full stellar structure and evolution modeling for single and binary-star population synthesis. The code is modular and allows the user to specify initial population properties and adopt choices that determine how stellar evolution proceeds. Populations are simulated with the use of MESA (ascl:1010.083) evolutionary tracks for single, non-interacting, and interacting binaries organized in grids. Machine-learning methods are incorporated and applied on the grids for classification and various interpolation calculations, and the development of irregular grids guided by active learning, for computational efficiency.

[ascl:2210.018] LavAtmos: Gas-melt equilibrium calculations for a given temperature and melt composition

LavAtmos performs gas-melt equilibrium calculations for a given temperature and melt composition. The thermodynamics of the melt are modeled by the MELTS code as presented in the Thermoengine package (ascl:2208.006). In combination with atmospheric chemistry codes, LavAtmos enables the characterization of interior compositions through atmospheric signatures.

[ascl:2210.017] PySME: Spectroscopy Made Easy reimplemented with Python

PySME is a partial reimplementation of Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME, ascl:1202.013), which fits an observed spectrum of a star with a model spectrum. The IDL routines of SME used to call a dynamically linked library of compiled C++ and Fortran programs have been rewritten in Python. In addition, an object oriented paradigm and continuous integration practices, including build automation, self-testing, and frequent builds, have been added.

[ascl:2210.016] PETSc: Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation

PETSc (Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) provides a suite of data structures and routines for the scalable (parallel) solution of scientific applications modeled by partial differential equations, and is intended for use in large-scale application projects. The toolkit includes a large suite of parallel linear, nonlinear equation solvers and ODE integrators that are easily used in application codes written in C, C++, Fortran and Python. PETSc provides many of the mechanisms needed within parallel application codes, such as simple parallel matrix and vector assembly routines that allow the overlap of communication and computation. In addition, PETSc (pronounced PET-see) includes support for managing parallel PDE discretizations.

[ascl:2210.015] Solar-MACH: Multi-spacecraft longitudinal configuration plotter

Solar-MACH (Solar MAgnetic Connection HAUS) derives and visualizes the spatial configuration and solar magnetic connection of different observers (i.e., spacecraft or planets) in the heliosphere at different times. It provides publication-ready figures for analyzing Solar Energetic Particle events (SEPs) or solar transients such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Solar-MACH is available as a Python package; a Streamlit-enabled tool that runs in a browser is also available (solar-mach.github.io)

[ascl:2210.014] Blacklight: GR ray tracing code for post-processing Athena++ simulations

Blacklight postprocesses general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation data and produces outputs for analyzing data sets, including maps of auxiliary quantities and false-color renderings. The code can use Athena++ (ascl:1912.005) outputs directly, and also supports files in HARM (ascl:1209.005) and iHARM3d (ascl:2210.013) format. Written in C++, Blacklight offers support for adaptive mesh refinement input, slow-light calculations, and adaptive ray tracing.

[ascl:2210.013] iharm3D: Hybrid MPI/OpenMP 3D HARM with vectorization

iharm3D implements the HARM algorithm (ascl:1209.005) with modifications and enables a second-order, conservative, shock-capturing scheme for general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD). Written in C, it simulates black hole accretion systems in arbitrary stationary spacetimes.

[ascl:2210.012] pixmappy: Python interface to gbdes astrometry solutions

pixmappy provides a Python interface to gbdes pixel map (astrometry) solutions. It reads the YAML format astrometry solutions produced by gbdes (ascl:2210.011) and issues a PixelMap instance, which is a map from one 2d coordinate system ("pixel") to another ("world") 2d system. A PixelMap instance can be used as a function mapping one (or many) coordinate pairs. An inverse method does reverse mapping, and the local jacobian of the map is available also. The type of mapping that can be expressed is very flexible, and PixelMaps can be compounded into chains of tranformations.

[ascl:2210.011] gbdes: DECam instrumental signature fitting and processing programs

gbdes derives photometric and astrometric calibration solutions for complex multi-detector astronomical imagers. The package includes routines to filter catalogs down to useful stellar objects, collect metadata from the catalogs and create a config file holding FITS binary tables describing exposures, instruments, fields, and other available information in the data, and uses a friends-of-friends matching algorithm to link together all detections of common objects found in distinct exposures. gbdes also calculates airmasses and parallactic angles for each exposure, calculates and saves the expected differential chromatic refraction (DCR) needed for precision astrometry, optimizes the parameters of a photometric model to maximize agreement between magnitudes measured in different exposures of the same source, and optimizing the parameters of an astrometric model to maximize agreement among the exposures and any reference catalogs, and performs other tasks. The solutions derived and used by gbdes are stored in YAML format; gbdes uses the Python code pixmappy (ascl:2210.012) to read the astrometric solution files and execute specified transformations.

[ascl:2210.010] TSRecon: Time series reconstruction method of massive astronomical catalogs

The time series reconstruction method of massive astronomical catalogs reconstructs all celestial objects' time series data for astronomical catalogs with great accuracy. In addition, the program, which requires a Spark cluster, solves the boundary source leakage problem on the premise of ensuring accuracy, and the user can set different parameters for different data sets to filter the error records in the catalogs.

[ascl:2210.009] NEMESIS: Non-linear optimal estimator for multivariate spectral analysis

NEMESIS (Non-linear optimal Estimator for MultivariatE spectral analySIS) is the general purpose correlated-k/LBL retrieval code developed from the RADTRAN project (ascl:2210.008). Originally based on the correlated-k approximation, NEMESIS also works in line-by-line (LBL) mode. It has been designed to be generally applicable to any planet and with any observing mode and so is suitable for both solar-system studies and also exoplanetary studies.

[ascl:2210.008] RADTRAN: General purpose planetary radiative transfer model

RADTRAN calculates the transmission, absorption or emission spectra emitted by planetary atmospheres using either line-by-line integration, spectral band models, or 'correlated-K' approaches. Part of the NEMESIS project (ascl:2210.009), the code also incorporates both multiple scattering and single scattering calculations. RADTRAN is general purpose and not hard-wired to any specific planet.

[ascl:2210.007] COMET: Emulated predictions of large-scale structure observables

COMET (Clustering Observables Modelled by Emulated perturbation Theory) provides emulated predictions of large-scale structure observables from models that are based on perturbation theory. It substantially speeds up these analytic computations without any relevant sacrifice in accuracy, enabling an extremely efficient exploration of large-scale structure likelihoods. At its core, COMET exploits an evolution mapping approach which gives it a high degree of flexibility and allows it to cover a wide cosmology parameter space at continuous redshifts up to z∼3z \sim 3z∼3. Among others, COMET supports parameters for cold dark matter density (ωc\omega_cωc​), baryon density (ωb\omega_bωb​), Scalar spectral index (nsn_sns​), Hubble expansion rate (hhh) and Curvature density (ΩK\Omega_KΩK​). The code can obtain the real-space galaxy power spectrum at one-loop order multipoles (monopole, quadrupole, hexadecapole) of the redshift-space, power spectrum at one-loop order, the linear matter power spectrum (with and without infrared resummation), Gaussian covariance matrices for the real-space power spectrum, and redshift-space multipoles and χ2\chi^2χ2's for arbitrary combinations of multipoles. COMET provides an easy-to-use interface for all of these computations.

[ascl:2210.006] ExoRad2: Generic point source radiometric model

ExoRad 2.0, a generic point source radiometric model, interfaces with any instrument to provide an estimate of several Payload performance metrics. For each target and for each photometric and spectroscopic channel, the code provides estimates of signals in pixels, saturation times, and read, photon, and dark current noise. ExoRad also provides estimates for the zodiacal background, inner sanctum, and sky foreground.

[ascl:2210.005] PSFr: Point Spread Function reconstruction

PSFr empirically reconstructs an oversampled version of the point spread function (PSF) from astronomical imaging observations. The code provides a light-weighted API of a refined version of an algorithm originally implemented in lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012). It provides user support with different artifacts in the data and supports the masking of pixels, or the treatment of saturation levels. PSFr has been used to reconstruct the PSF from multiply imaged lensed quasar images observed by the Hubble Space Telescope in a crowded lensing environment and more recently with James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) imaging data for a wide dynamical flux range.

[ascl:2210.004] Finder_charts: Create finder charts from image data of various sky surveys

Finder_charts creates multi-band finder charts from image data of various partial- and all-sky surveys such as DSS, 2MASS, WISE, UKIDSS, VHS, Pan-STARRS, and DES. It also creates a WISE time series of image data acquired between 2010 and 2021. All images are reprojected so that north is up and east is to the left. The resulting finder charts can be overplotted with corresponding catalog positions. All catalog entries within the specified field of view can be saved in a variety of formats, including ipac, csv, and tex, as can the finder charts in png, pdf, eps, and other common graphics formats. Finder_charts consists of a single Python module, which depends only on well-known packages, making it easy to install.

[ascl:2210.003] NIRDust: Near Infrared Dust finder for Type2 AGN K-band spectra

NIRDust uses K-band (2.2 micrometers) spectra to measure the temperature of the dust heated by an Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) accretion disk. The package provides several functionalities to pre-process spectra and fit the hot dust component of a AGN K-band spectrum with a blackbody function. NIRDust needs a minimum of two spectra to run: a target spectrum, where the dust temperature will be estimated, and a reference spectrum, where the emission is considered to be purely stellar. The reference spectrum will be used by NIRDust to model the stellar emission from the target spectrum.

[ascl:2210.002] SPINspiral: Parameter estimation for analyzing gravitational-wave signals

SPINspiral analyzes gravitational-wave signals from stellar-mass binary inspirals detected by ground-based interferometers such as LIGO and Virgo. It performs parameter estimation on these signals using Markov-chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) techniques. This analysis includes the spins of the binary components. Written in C, the package is modular; its main routine is as small as possible and calls other routines, which perform tasks such as reading input, choosing and setting (starting or injection) parameters, and handling noise. Other routines compute overlaps and likelihoods, contain the MCMC core, and manage more general support functions and third-party routines.

[ascl:2210.001] PSS: Pulsar Survey Scraper

Pulsar Survey Scraper aggregates pulsar discoveries before they are included in the ATNF pulsar catalog and enables searching and filtering based on position and dispersion measure. This facilitates identifying new pulsar discoveries. Pulsar Survey Scraper can be downloaded or run online using the Pulsar Survey Scraper webform.

[submitted] EleFits

EleFits is a modern C++ package to read and write FITS files which focuses on safety, user-friendliness, and performance.

[ascl:2209.020] FastQSL: Quasi-separatrix Layers computation method

FastQSL calculate the squashing factor Q at the photosphere, a cross section, or a box volume, given a 3D magnetic field with Cartesian, uniform or stretched grids. It is available in IDL and in an optimized version using Fortran for calculations and field line tracing. Use of a GPU accelerates a step-size adaptive scheme for the most computationally intensive part, the field line tracing, making the code fast and efficient.

[ascl:2209.019] SolTrack: Compute the position of the Sun in topocentric coordinates

SolTrack computes the position of the Sun, the rise and set times and azimuths, and transit times and altitudes. It includes corrections for aberration and parallax, and has a simple routine to correct for atmospheric refraction, taking into account local atmospheric conditions. SolTrack is derived from the Fortran library libTheSky (ascl:2209.018). The package can be used to track the Sun on a low-specs machine, such as a microcontroller or PLC, and can be used for (highly) concentrated (photovoltaic) solar power or accurate solar-energy modeling.

[ascl:2209.018] libTheSky: Compute positions of celestial bodies and events

libTheSky compute the positions of celestial bodies, such as the Moon, planets, and stars, and events, including conjunctions and eclipses, with great accuracy. Written in Fortran, libTheSky can use different reference frames (heliocentric, geocentric, topocentric) and coordinate systems (ecliptic, equatorial, galactic; spherical, rectangular), and the user can choose low- or high-accuracy calculations, depending on need.

[ascl:2209.017] SpectraPy: Extract and reduce astronomical spectral data

SpectraPy collects algorithms and methods for data reduction of astronomical spectra obtained by a through slits spectrograph. It produces two-dimensional wavelength calibrated spectra corrected by instrument distortions. The library is designed to be spectrograph independent and can be used on both longslit (LS) and multi object spectrograph (MOS) data. SpectraPy comes with a set of already configured spectrographs, but it can be easily configured to reduce data of other instruments.

[ascl:2209.016] RAPOC: Rosseland and Planck mean opacities calculator

RAPOC (Rosseland and Planck Opacity Converter) uses molecular absorption measurements (i.e., wavelength-dependent opacities) for a given temperature, pressure, and wavelength range to calculate Rosseland and Planck mean opacities for use in atmospheric modeling. The code interpolates between discrete data points and can use ExoMol and DACE data, or any user-defined data provided in a readable format. RAPOC is simple, straightforward, and easily incorporated into other codes.

[ascl:2209.015] TauREx3: Tau Retrieval for Exoplanets

TauREx 3 (Tau Retrieval for Exoplanets) provides a fully Bayesian inverse atmospheric retrieval framework for exoplanetary atmosphere modeling and retrievals. It is fully customizable, allowing the user to mix and match atmospheric parameters and add additional ones. The framework builds forward models, simulates instruments, and performs retrievals, and provides a rich library of classes for building additional programs and using new atmospheric parameters.

[ascl:2209.014] SyntheticISOs: Synthetic Population of Interstellar Objects

Synthetic Population of Interstellar Objects generates a synthetic population of interstellar objects (orbits and sizes) in arbitrary volume of space around the Sun. The only necessary assumption is that the population of ISOs in the interstellar space (far from any massive body) is homogeneous and isotropic. The assumed distribution of interstellar velocities of ISOs has to be provided as an input. This distribution can be defined analytically, but also in a discrete form. The algorithm, based on the multivariate inverse transform sampling method, is implemented in Python.

[ascl:2209.013] wsynphot: Synthetic photometry package using quantities

wsynphot provides a broad set of filters, including observation facility, instrument, and wavelength range, and functions for imaging stars to produce a filter curve showing the transmission of light for each wavelength value. It can create a filter curve object, plot the curve, and allows the user to do calculations on the filter curve object.

[ascl:2209.012] URILIGHT: Time-dependent Monte-Carlo radiative-transfer

The time dependent Monte-Carlo code URILIGHT, written in Fortran 90, assumes homologous expansion. Energy deposition resulting from the decay of radioactive isotopes is calculated by a Monte-Carlo solution of the γ-ray transport, for which interaction with matter is included through Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption. The temperature is iteratively solved for in each cell by requiring that the total emissivity equals the total absorbed energy.

[ascl:2209.011] GaLight: 2D modeling of galaxy images

GaLight (Galaxy shapes of Light) performs two-dimensional model fitting of optical and near-infrared images to characterize the light distribution of galaxies with components including a disk, bulge, bar and quasar. Light is decomposes into PSF and Sersic, and the fitting is based on lenstronomy (ascl:1804.01). GaLight's automated features including searching PSF stars in the FOV, automatically estimating the background noise level, and cutting out the target object galaxies (QSOs) and preparing the materials to model the data. It can also detect objects in the cutout stamp and quickly create Sersic keywords to model them, and model QSOs and galaxies using 2D Sersic profile and scaled point source.

[ascl:2209.010] HyPhy: Hydrodynamical Physics via Deep Generative Painting

HyPhy maps from dark matter only simulations to full hydrodynamical physics models. It uses a fully convolutional variational auto-encoder (VAE) to synthesize hydrodynamic fields conditioned on dark matter fields from N-body simulations. After training, HyPhy can probabilistically map new dark matter only simulations to corresponding full hydrodynamical outputs and generate posterior samples for studying the variance of the mapping. This conditional deep generative model is implemented in TensorFlow.

[ascl:2209.009] GRUMPY: Galaxy formation with RegUlator Model in PYthon

GRUMPY (Galaxy formation with RegUlator Model in PYthon) models the formation of dwarf galaxies. When coupled with realistic mass accretion histories of halos from simulations and reasonable choices for model parameter values, this simple regulator-type framework reproduces a broad range of observed properties of dwarf galaxies over seven orders of magnitude in stellar mass. GRUMPY matches observational constraints on the stellar mass--halo mass relation and observed relations between stellar mass and gas phase and stellar metallicities, gas mass, size, and star formation rate. It also models the general form and diversity of star formation histories (SFHs) of observed dwarf galaxies. The software can be used to predict photometric properties of dwarf galaxies hosted by dark matter haloes in N-body simulations, such as colors, surface brightnesses, and mass-to-light ratios and to forward model observations of dwarf galaxies.

[ascl:2209.008] PINION: Accelerating radiative transfer simulations for cosmic reionization

PINION (Physics-Informed neural Network for reIONization) predicts the complete 4-D hydrogen fraction evolution from the smoothed gas and mass density fields from pre-computed N-body simulations. Trained on C2-Ray simulation outputs with a physics constraint on the reionization chemistry equation, PINION accurately predicts the entire reionization history between z = 6 and 12 with only five redshift snapshots and a propagation mask as a simplistic approximation of the ionizing photon mean free path. The network's predictions are in good agreement with simulation to redshift z > 7, though the oversimplified propagation mask degrades the network's accuracy for z < 7.

[ascl:2209.007] AMBER: Fast pipeline for detecting single-pulse radio transients

AMBER (Apertif Monitor for Bursts Encountered in Real-time) detects single-pulse radio phenomena, such as pulsars and fast radio bursts, in real time. It is a fully auto-tuned pipeline that offloads compute-intensive kernels to many-core accelerators; the software automatically tunes these kernels to achieve high performance on different platforms.

[ascl:2209.006] KaRMMa: Curved-sky mass map reconstruction

KaRMMa (Kappa Reconstruction for Mass MApping) performs curved-sky mass map reconstruction using a lognormal prior from weak-lensing surveys. It uses a fully Bayesian approach with a physically motivated lognormal prior to sample from the posterior distribution of convergence maps. The posterior distribution of KaRMMa maps are nearly unbiased in one-point and two-point functions and peak/void counts. KaRMMa successfully captures the non-Gaussian nature of the distribution of κ values in the simulated maps, and KaRMMa posteriors correctly characterize the uncertainty in summary statistics.

[ascl:2209.005] SCORE: Shape COnstraint REstoration

The Shape COnstraint REstoration algorithm (SCORE) is a proximal algorithm based on sparsity and shape constraints to restore images. Its main purpose is to restore images while preserving their shape information. It can, for example, denoise a galaxy image by instanciating SCORE and using its denoise method and then visualize the results, and can deconvolve multiple images with different parameter values.

[ascl:2209.004] Cluster Toolkit: Tools for analyzing galaxy clusters

Cluster Toolkit calculates weak lensing signals from galaxy clusters and cluster cosmology. It offers 3D density and correlation functions, halo bias models, projected density and differential profiles, and radially averaged profiles. It also calculates halo mass functions, mass-concentration relations, Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) cluster signals, and cluster magnification. Cluster Toolkit consists of a Python front end wrapped around a well optimized back end in C.

[ascl:2209.003] DeepMass: Cosmological map inference with deep learning

DeepMass infers dark matter maps from weak gravitational lensing measurements and uses deep learning to reconstruct cosmological maps. The code can also be incorporated into a Moment Network to enable high-dimensional likelihood-free inference.

[ascl:2209.002] Herculens: Differentiable gravitational lensing

Herculens models imaging data of strong gravitational lenses. The package supports various degrees of model complexity, ranging from standard smooth analytical profiles to pixelated models and machine learning approaches. In particular, it implements multiscale pixelated models regularized with sparsity constraints and wavelet decomposition, for modeling both the source light distribution and the lens potential. The code is fully differentiable - based on JAX (ascl:2111.002) - which enables fast convergence to the solution, access to the parameters covariance matrix, efficient exploration of the parameter space including the sampling of posterior distributions using variational inference or Hamiltonian Monte-Carlo methods.

[ascl:2209.001] A-SLOTH: Semi-analytical model to connect first stars and galaxies to observables

A-SLOTH (Ancient Stars and Local Observables by Tracing Halos) connects the formation of the first stars and galaxies to observables. The model is based on dark matter merger trees, on which A-SLOTH applies analytical recipes for baryonic physics to model the formation of both metal-free and metal-poor stars and the transition between them. The software samples individual stars and includes radiative, chemical, and mechanical feedback. A-SLOTH has versatile applications with moderate computational requirements. It can be used to constrain the properties of the first stars and high-z galaxies based on local observables, predicts properties of the oldest and most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way, can serve as a subgrid model for larger cosmological simulations, and predicts next-generation observables of the early Universe, such as supernova rates or gravitational wave events.

[ascl:2208.025] Yonder: Data denoising and reconstruction

YONDER uses singular value decomposition to perform low-rank data denoising and reconstruction. It takes a tabular data matrix and an error matrix as input and returns a denoised version of the original dataset as output. The approach enables a more accurate data analysis in the presence of uncertainties. Consequently, this package can be used as a simple toolbox to perform astronomical data cleaning.

[ascl:2208.024] toise: Performance estimator for high-energy neutrino detectors

The toise framework estimates the sensitivity of natural-medium neutrino detectors such as IceCube-Gen2 to sources of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. It uses parameterizations of a detector's fiducial area or volume, selection efficiency, energy resolution, angular resolution, and event classification efficiency to convert (surface) neutrino fluxes into mean event rates in bins of observable space. These are then used to estimate statistical quantities of interest, e.g., the median sensitivity to some flux (i.e., 90% upper limit assuming the true flux is zero) or the median discovery potential (i.e., the flux level at which the null hypothesis would be rejected at 5 sigma in 50% of realizations).

[ascl:2208.023] CubeFit: Regularized 3D fitting for spectro-imaging data

Cubefit is an OXY class that performs spectral fitting with spatial regularization in a spectro-imaging context. The 3D model is based on a 1D model and 2D parameter maps; the 2D maps are regularized using an L1L2 regularization by default. The estimator is a compound of a chi^2 based on the 1D model, a regularization term based of the 2D regularization of the various 2D parameter maps, and an optional decorrelation term based on the cross-correlation of specific pairs of parameter maps.

[ascl:2208.022] PyNAPLE: Automated pipeline for detecting changes on the lunar surface

PyNAPLE (PYthon Nac Automated Pair Lunar Evaluator) detects changes and new impact craters on the lunar surface using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera (LRO NAC) images. The code enables large scale analyses of sub-kilometer scale cratering rates and refinement of both scaling laws and the luminous efficiency.

[ascl:2208.021] GSSP: Grid Search in Stellar Parameters

GSSP (Grid Search in Stellar Parameters) is based on a grid search in the fundamental atmospheric parameters and (optionally) individual chemical abundances of the star (or binary stellar components) in question. It uses atmosphere models and spectrum synthesis, which assumes a comparison of the observations with each theoretical spectrum from the grid. The code can optimize five stellar parameters at a time (effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, microturbulent velocity, and projected rotational velocity of the star) and synthetic spectra can be computed in any number of wavelength ranges. GSSP builds the grid of theoretical spectra from all possible combinations of the above mentioned parameters, and delivers the set of best fit parameters, the corresponding synthetic spectrum, and the ASCII file containing the individual parameter values for all grid points and the corresponding chi-square values.

[ascl:2208.020] GStokes: Magnetic field structure and line profiles calculator

GStokes performs simple multipolar fits to circular polarization data to provide information about the field strength and geometry. It provides forward calculation of the disc-integrated Stokes parameter profiles as well as magnetic inversions under several widely used simplifying approximations of the polarized line formation. GStokes implements the Unno–Rachkovsky analytical solution of the polarized radiative transfer equation and the weak-field approximation with the Gaussian local profiles. The magnetic field geometry is described with one of the common low-order multipolar field parametrizations. Written in IDL, GStokes provides a user-friendly graphical front-end.

[ascl:2208.019] RadioLensfit: Radio weak lensing shear measurement in the visibility domain

RadioLensfit measures star-forming galaxy ellipticities using a Bayesian model fitting approach. The software uses an analytical exponential Sersic model and works in the visibility domain avoiding Fourier Transform. It also simulates visibilities of observed SF galaxies given a source catalog and Measurement Sets containing the description of the radio interferometer and of the observation. It provides both serial and MPI versions.

[ascl:2208.018] EstrellaNueva: Expected rates of supernova neutrinos calculator

EstrellaNueva calculates expected rates of supernova neutrinos in detectors. It provides a link between supernova simulations and the expected events in detectors by calculating fluences and event rates in order to ease any comparison between theory and observation. The software is a standalone tool for exploring many physics scenarios, and offers an option to add analytical cross sections and define any target material.

[ascl:2208.017] HOCHUNK3D: Dust radiative transfer in 3D

HOCHUNK3D is an updated version of the HOCHUNK radiative equilibrium code (ascl:1711.013); the code has been converted to Fortran 95, which allows a specification of one-dimensional (1D), 2D, or 3D grids at runtime. The code is parallelized so it can be run on multiple processors on one machine, or on multiple machines in a network. It includes 3-D functionality and several other additional geometries and features. The code calculates radiative equilibrium temperature solution, thermal and PAH/vsg emission, scattering and polarization in protostellar geometries. HOCHUNK3D also computes spectral energy distributions (SEDs), polarization spectra, and images.

[ascl:2208.016] CRPropa3: Simulation framework for propagating extraterrestrial ultra-high energy particles

CRPropa3, an improved version of CRPropa2 (ascl:1412.013), provides a simulation framework to study the propagation of ultra-high-energy nuclei up to iron on their voyage through an (extra)galactic environment. It takes into account pion production, photodisintegration, and energy losses by pair production of all relevant isotopes in the ambient low-energy photon fields, as well as nuclear decay. CRPropa3 can model the deflection in (inter)galactic magnetic fields, the propagation of secondary electromagnetic cascades, and neutrinos for a multitude of scenarios for different source distributions and magnetic environments. It enables the user to predict the spectra of UHECR (and of their secondaries), their composition and arrival direction distribution. Additionally, the low-energy Galactic propagation can be simulated by solving the transport equation using stochastic differential equations. CRPropa3 features a very flexible simulation setup with python steering and shared-memory parallelization.

[ascl:2208.015] J-comb: Combine high-resolution and low-resolution data

J-comb combines high-resolution data with large-scale missing information with low-resolution data containing the short spacing. Based on uvcombine (ascl:2208.014), it takes as input FITS files of low- and high-resolution images, the angular resolution of the input images, and the pixel size of the input images, and outputs a FITS file of the combined image.

[ascl:2208.014] uvcombine: Combine images with different resolutions

uvcombine combines single-dish and interferometric data. It can combine high-resolution images that are missing large angular scales (Fourier-domain short-spacings) with low-resolution images containing the short/zero spacing. uvcombine includes the "feathering" technique for interferometry data, implementing a similar approach to CASA’s (ascl:1107.013) feather task but with additional options. Also included are consistency tests for the flux calibration and single-dish scale by comparing the data in the uv-overlap range.

[ascl:2208.013] SPAMMS: Spectroscopic PAtch Model for Massive Stars

SPAMMS (Spectroscopic PAtch Model for Massive Stars), designed with geometrically deformed systems in mind, combines the eclipsing binary modelling code PHOEBE 2 (ascl:1106.002) and the NLTE radiative transfer code FASTWIND to produce synthetic spectra for systems at given phases, orientations and geometries. SPAMMS reproduces the morphology of observed spectral line profiles for overcontact systems and the Rossiter-Mclaughlin and Struve-Sahade effects.

[ascl:2208.012] DELIGHT: Identify host galaxies of transient candidates

DELIGHT (Deep Learning Identification of Galaxy Hosts of Transients) automatically identifies host galaxies of transient candidates using multi-resolution images and a convolutional neural network. This library has a class with several methods to get the most likely host coordinates starting from given transient coordinates. In order to do this, the DELIGHT object needs a list of object identifiers and coordinates (oid, ra, dec). With this information, it downloads PanSTARRS images centered around the position of the transients (2 arcmin x 2 arcmin), gets their WCS solutions, creates the multi-resolution images, does some extra preprocessing of the data, and finally predicts the position of the hosts using a multi-resolution image and a convolutional neural network. DELIGHT can also estimate the host's semi-major axis if requested, taking advantage of the multi-resolution images.

[ascl:2208.011] POIS: Python Optical Interferometry Simulation

POIS (Python Optical Interferometry Simulation) provides the building blocks to simulate the operation of a ground-based optical interferometer perturbed by atmospheric seeing perturbations. The package includes functions to generate simulated atmospheric turbulent wavefront perturbations, correct these perturbations using adaptive optics, and combine beams from an arbitrary number of telescopes, with or without spatial filtering, to provide complex fringe visibility measurements.

[ascl:2208.010] FFD: Flare Frequency Distribution

FFD (Flare Frequency Distribution) fits power-laws to FFDs. FFDs relate the frequency (i.e., occurrence rate) of flares to their energy, peak flux, photometric equivalent width, or other parameters. This module was created to handle disparate datasets between which the flare detection limit varies; in essence, the number of flares detected is treated as following a Poisson distribution while the flare energies are treated as following a power law.

[ascl:2208.009] LeXInt: Leja Exponential Integrators

LeXInt (Leja interpolation for eXponential Integrators) is a temporal exponential integration package using the method of polynomial interpolation at Leja points. Exponential Rosenbrock (EXPRB) and Exponential Propagation Iterative Runge-Kutta (EPIRK) methods use the Leja interpolation method to compute the functions. For linear PDEs, one can get the exact solution (in time) by directly computing the matrix exponential.

[ascl:2208.008] RJ-plots: Automated objective classification of 2D structures

RJ-plots uses a moments of inertia method to disentangle a 2D structure's elongation from its centrally over/under-density, thus providing a means for the automated and objective classification of such structures. It may be applied to any 2D pixelated image such as column density maps or moment zero maps of molecular lines. This method is a further development of J-plots (ascl:2009.007).

[ascl:2208.007] VapoRock: Modeling magma ocean atmospheres and stellar nebula

VapoRock calculates the equilibrium partial pressures of metal-bearing gas species of specific elements above the magma ocean surface to determine the metal-bearing composition of the atmosphere as a function of temperature and the bulk composition of the magma ocean. It utilizes ENKI's ThermoEngine (ascl:2208.006) and combines estimates for element activities in silicate melts with thermodynamic data for metal and metal oxide vapor species.

[ascl:2208.006] ThermoEngine: Thermodynamic properties estimator and phase equilibrium calculator

ThermoEngine estimates the thermodynamic properties of minerals, fluids, and melts, and calculates phase equilibriums. The Equilibrate module of ThermoEngine provides Python functions and classes for computing equilibrium phase assemblages with focus on MELTS calculations. The Phases module includes Python functions and classes for computing standard thermodynamic calculations utilizing the Berman, Holland and Powell, or Stixrude-Lithgow-Bertelloni endmember databases, and calculations based on solution properties utilized by MELTS. There are many helper functions available in this module that assist in the calculation of pseudosections, univariant equilibria and the construction of phase diagrams.

[ascl:2208.005] Asymmetric Uncertainty: Handling nonstandard numerical uncertainties

Asymmetric Uncertainty implements and provides an object class for dealing with uncertainties for physical quantities that are not symmetric. Instances of the class behave appropriately with other numeric objects under most mathematical operations, and the associated errors propagate accordingly. The class also provides utilities such as methods for evaluating and plotting probability density functions, as well as capabilities for handling arrays of such objects. Standard and symmetric uncertainties are also supported.

[ascl:2208.004] TOM Toolkit: Target and Observation Manager Toolkit

The TOM Toolkit combines a flexible, searchable database of all information related to a scientific research project, with an observation and data analysis control system, and communication and data visualization tools. This Toolkit includes a fully operational TOM (Target and Observation Manager) system in addition to a range of optional tools for specific tasks, including interfaces to widely-used observing facilities and data archives and data visualization tools. With TOM Toolkit, project teams can develop and customize a system for their own science goals, without needing specialist expertise in databasing.

[ascl:2208.003] Scatfit: Scattering fits of time domain radio signals (Fast Radio Bursts or pulsars)

Scatfit models observed burst signals of impulsive time domain radio signals ( e.g., Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) or pulsars pulses), which usually are convolution products of various effects, and fits them to the experimental data. It includes several models for scattering and instrumental effects. The code loads the experimental time domain radio data, cleans them, fits an aggregate scattering model to the data, and robustly estimates the model parameters and their uncertainties. Additionally, scatfit determines the scaling of the scattering time with frequency, i.e. the scattering index, and the scattering-corrected dispersion measure of the burst or pulse.

[ascl:2208.002] qrpca: QR-based Principal Components Analysis

qrpca uses QR-decomposition for fast principal component analysis. The software is particularly suited for large dimensional matrices. It makes use of torch for internal matrix computations and enables GPU acceleration, when available. Written in both R and python languages, qrpca provides functionalities similar to the prcomp (R) and sklearn (python) packages.

[ascl:2208.001] BlaST: Synchrotron peak estimator for blazars

BlaST (Blazar Synchrotron Tool) estimates the synchrotron peak of blazars given their spectral energy distribution. It uses a machine-learning algorithm that simplifies the estimation and also provides a reliable uncertainty estimation. The package naturally accounts for additional SED components from the host galaxy and the disk emission. BlaST also supports bulk estimation, e.g. estimating a whole catalog, by providing a directory or zip file containing the seds as well as an output file in which to write the results.

Would you like to view a random code?