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[submitted] pyLIMA: An Open Source Package for Microlensing Modeling

pyLIMA is an open source software for microlensing modeling. Based on Python, the goal is to offer to users an efficient and user friendly package to analyze their data. The code is written and tested with professional standards, such as PEP8 or unit testing.

[ascl:1609.002] StarPy: Quenched star formation history parameters of a galaxy using MCMC

StarPy derives the quenching star formation history (SFH) of a single galaxy through the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method code emcee (ascl:1303.002). The sample function implements the emcee EnsembleSampler function for the galaxy colors input. Burn-in is run and calculated for the length specified before the sampler is reset and then run for the length of steps specified. StarPy provides the ability to use the look-up tables provided or creating your own.

[ascl:1609.001] T-PHOT: PSF-matched, prior-based, multiwavelength extragalactic deconfusion photometry

T-PHOT extracts accurate photometry from low-resolution images of extragalactic fields, where the blending of sources can be a serious problem for accurate and unbiased measurement of fluxes and colors. It gathers data from a high-resolution image of a region of the sky and uses the source positions and morphologies to obtain priors for the photometric analysis of the lower resolution image of the same field. T-PHOT handles different types of datasets as input priors, including a list of objects that will be used to obtain cutouts from the real high-resolution image, a set of analytical models (as .fits stamps), and a list of unresolved, point-like sources, useful for example for far-infrared wavelength domains. T-PHOT yields accurate estimations of fluxes within the intrinsic uncertainties of the method when systematic errors are taken into account (which can be done using a flagging code given in the output), and handles multiwavelength optical to far-infrared image photometry. T-PHOT was developed as part of the ASTRODEEP project (www.astrodeep.eu).

[ascl:1608.020] SPIDERz: SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts

SPIDERz (SuPport vector classification for IDEntifying Redshifts) applies powerful support vector machine (SVM) optimization and statistical learning techniques to custom data sets to obtain accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimations. It is written for the IDL environment and can be applied to traditional data sets consisting of photometric band magnitudes, or alternatively to data sets with additional galaxy parameters (such as shape information) to investigate potential correlations between the extra galaxy parameters and redshift.

[ascl:1608.019] NEBULAR: Spectrum synthesis for mixed hydrogen-helium gas in ionization equilibrium

NEBULAR synthesizes the spectrum of a mixed hydrogen helium gas in collisional ionization equilibrium. It is not a spectral fitting code, but it can be used to resample a model spectrum onto the wavelength grid of a real observation. It supports a wide range of temperatures and densities. NEBULAR includes free-free, free-bound, two-photon and line emission from HI, HeI and HeII. The code will either return the composite model spectrum, or, if desired, the unrescaled atomic emission coefficients. It is written in C++ and depends on the GNU Scientific Library (GSL).

[ascl:1608.018] LORENE: Spectral methods differential equations solver

LORENE (Langage Objet pour la RElativité NumériquE) solves various problems arising in numerical relativity, and more generally in computational astrophysics. It is a set of C++ classes and provides tools to solve partial differential equations by means of multi-domain spectral methods. LORENE classes implement basic structures such as arrays and matrices, but also abstract mathematical objects, such as tensors, and astrophysical objects, such as stars and black holes.

[ascl:1608.017] 21CMMC: Parallelized Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis tool for the epoch of reionization (EoR)

21CMMC is an efficient Python sampler of the semi-numerical reionization simulation code 21cmFAST (ascl:1102.023). It can recover constraints on astrophysical parameters from current or future 21 cm EoR experiments, accommodating a variety of EoR models, as well as priors on individual model parameters and the reionization history. By studying the resulting impact on the EoR astrophysical constraints, 21CMMC can be used to optimize foreground cleaning algorithms; interferometer designs; observing strategies; alternate statistics characterizing the 21cm signal; and synergies with other observational programs.

[ascl:1608.016] NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

[ascl:1608.015] 2DFFT: Measuring Galactic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

2DFFT utilizes two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms; this provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature and allows comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. 2DFFT requires fourn.c from Numerical Recipes in C (Press et al. 1989).

[ascl:1608.014] gevolution: General Relativity Cosmological N-body code for evolution of large scale structures

The N-body code gevolution complies with general relativity principles at every step; it calculates all six metric degrees of freedom in Poisson gauge. N-body particles are evolved by solving the geodesic equation written in terms of a canonical momentum to remain valid for relativistic particles. gevolution can be extended to include different kinds of dark energy or modified gravity models, going beyond the usually adopted quasi-static approximation. A weak field expansion is the central element of gevolution; this permits the code to treat settings in which no strong gravitational fields appear, including arbitrary scenarios with relativistic sources as long as gravitational fields are not very strong. The framework is well suited for cosmology, but may also be useful for astrophysical applications with moderate gravitational fields where a Newtonian treatment is insufficient.

[ascl:1608.013] DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

[submitted] ExoPlanet

ExoPlanet provides a graphical interface for the construction, evaluation and application of a machine learning model in predictive analysis. With the back-end built using the numpy and scikit-learn libraries, ExoPlanet couples fast and well tested algorithms, a UI designed over the PyQt framework, and graphs rendered using Matplotlib. This serves to provide the user with a rich interface, rapid analytics and interactive visuals.

ExoPlanet is designed to have a minimal learning curve to allow researchers to focus more on the applicative aspect of machine learning algorithms rather than their implementation details and supports both methods of learning, providing algorithms for unsupervised and supervised training, which may be done with continuous or discrete labels. The parameters of each algorithms can be adjusted to ensure the best fit for the data. Training data is read from a CSV file, and after training is complete, ExoPlanet automates the building of the visual representations for the trained model. Once training and evaluation yield satisfactory results, the model may be used to make data based predictions on a new data set.

[ascl:1608.012] OBERON: OBliquity and Energy balance Run on N-body systems

OBERON (OBliquity and Energy balance Run on N-body systems) models the climate of Earthlike planets under the effects of an arbitrary number and arrangement of other bodies, such as stars, planets and moons. The code, written in C++, simultaneously computes N body motions using a 4th order Hermite integrator, simulates climates using a 1D latitudinal energy balance model, and evolves the orbital spin of bodies using the equations of Laskar (1986a,b).

[ascl:1608.011] PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

[ascl:1608.010] pvextractor: Position-Velocity Diagram Extractor

Given a path defined in sky coordinates and a spectral cube, pvextractor extracts a slice of the cube along that path and along the spectral axis to produce a position-velocity or position-frequency slice. The path can be defined programmatically in pixel or world coordinates, and can also be drawn interactively using a simple GUI. Pvextractor is the main function, but also includes a few utilities related to header trimming and parsing.

[ascl:1608.009] FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

[ascl:1608.008] Cuba: Multidimensional numerical integration library

The Cuba library offers four independent routines for multidimensional numerical integration: Vegas, Suave, Divonne, and Cuhre. The four algorithms work by very different methods, and can integrate vector integrands and have very similar Fortran, C/C++, and Mathematica interfaces. Their invocation is very similar, making it easy to cross-check by substituting one method by another. For further safeguarding, the output is supplemented by a chi-square probability which quantifies the reliability of the error estimate.

[ascl:1608.007] BASE-9: Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with nine variables

The BASE-9 (Bayesian Analysis for Stellar Evolution with nine variables) software suite recovers star cluster and stellar parameters from photometry and is useful for analyzing single-age, single-metallicity star clusters, binaries, or single stars, and for simulating such systems. BASE-9 uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique along with brute force numerical integration to estimate the posterior probability distribution for the age, metallicity, helium abundance, distance modulus, line-of-sight absorption, and parameters of the initial-final mass relation (IFMR) for a cluster, and for the primary mass, secondary mass (if a binary), and cluster probability for every potential cluster member. The MCMC technique is used for the cluster quantities (the first six items listed above) and numerical integration is used for the stellar quantities (the last three items in the above list).

[ascl:1608.006] Gemini IRAF: Data reduction software for the Gemini telescopes

The Gemini IRAF package processes observational data obtained with the Gemini telescopes. It is an external package layered upon IRAF and supports data from numerous instruments, including FLAMINGOS-2, GMOS-N, GMOS-S, GNIRS, GSAOI, NIFS, and NIRI. The Gemini IRAF package is organized into sub-packages; it contains a generic tools package, "gemtools", along with instrument-specific packages. The raw data from the Gemini facility instruments are stored as Multi-Extension FITS (MEF) files. Therefore, all the tasks in the Gemini IRAF package, intended for processing data from the Gemini facility instruments, are capable of handling MEF files.

[ascl:1608.005] AstroVis: Visualizing astronomical data cubes

AstroVis enables rapid visualization of large data files on platforms supporting the OpenGL rendering library. Radio astronomical observations are typically three dimensional and stored as data cubes. AstroVis implements a scalable approach to accessing these files using three components: a File Access Component (FAC) that reduces the impact of reading time, which speeds up access to the data; the Image Processing Component (IPC), which breaks up the data cube into smaller pieces that can be processed locally and gives a representation of the whole file; and Data Visualization, which implements an approach of Overview + Detail to reduces the dimensions of the data being worked with and the amount of memory required to store it. The result is a 3D display paired with a 2D detail display that contains a small subsection of the original file in full resolution without reducing the data in any way.

[ascl:1608.004] BART: Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer fitting code

BART implements a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer scheme for extracting parameters from spectra of planetary atmospheres. BART combines a thermochemical-equilibrium code, a one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer code, and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module to constrain the atmospheric temperature and chemical-abundance profiles of exoplanets.

[ascl:1608.003] appaloosa: Python-based flare finding code for Kepler light curves

The appaloosa suite automates flare-finding in every Kepler light curves. It builds quiescent light curve models that include long- and short-cadence data through iterative de-trending and includes completeness estimates via artificial flare injection and recovery tests.

[ascl:1608.002] pyXSIM: Synthetic X-ray observations generator

pyXSIM simulates X-ray observations from astrophysical sources. X-rays probe the high-energy universe, from hot galaxy clusters to compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes and many interesting sources in between. pyXSIM generates synthetic X-ray observations of these sources from a wide variety of models, whether from grid-based simulation codes such as FLASH (ascl:1010.082), Enzo (ascl:1010.072), and Athena (ascl:1010.014), to particle-based codes such as Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO, and even from datasets that have been created “by hand”, such as from NumPy arrays. pyXSIM can also manipulate the synthetic observations it produces in various ways and export the simulated X-ray events to other software packages to simulate the end products of specific X-ray observatories. pyXSIM is an implementation of the PHOX (ascl:1112.004) algorithm and was initially the photon_simulator analysis module in yt (ascl:1011.022); it is dependent on yt.

[ascl:1608.001] Stingray: Spectral-timing software

Stingray is a spectral-timing software package for astrophysical X-ray (and more) data. The package merges existing efforts for a (spectral-)timing package in Python and is composed of a library of time series methods (including power spectra, cross spectra, covariance spectra, and lags); scripts to load FITS data files from different missions; a simulator of light curves and event lists that includes different kinds of variability and more complicated phenomena based on the impulse response of given physical events (e.g. reverberation); and a GUI to ease the learning curve for new users.

[ascl:1607.020] SEEK: Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer

SEEK (Signal Extraction and Emission Kartographer) processes time-ordered-data from single dish radio telescopes or from the simulation pipline HIDE (ascl:1607.019), removes artifacts from Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), automatically applies flux calibration, and recovers the astronomical radio signal. With its companion code HIDE (ascl:1607.019), it provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.

[ascl:1607.019] HIDE: HI Data Emulator

HIDE (HI Data Emulator) forward-models the process of collecting astronomical radio signals in a single dish radio telescope instrument and outputs pixel-level time-ordered-data. Written in Python, HIDE models the noise and RFI modeling of the data and with its companion code SEEK (ascl:1607.020) provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.

[ascl:1607.018] LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

[ascl:1607.017] BoxRemap: Volume and local structure preserving mapping of periodic boxes

BoxRemap remaps the cubical domain of a cosmological simulation into simple non-cubical shapes. It can be used for on-the-fly remappings of the simulation geometry and is volume-preserving; remapped geometry has the same volume V = L3 as the original simulation box. The remappings are structure-preserving (local neighboring structures are mapped to neighboring places) and one-to-one, with every particle/halo/galaxy/etc. appearing once and only once in the remapped volume.

[ascl:1607.016] astLib: Tools for research astronomers

astLib is a set of Python modules for performing astronomical plots, some statistics, common calculations, coordinate conversions, and manipulating FITS images with World Coordinate System (WCS) information through PyWCSTools, a simple wrapping of WCSTools (ascl:1109.015).

[ascl:1607.015] RT1D: 1D code for Rayleigh-Taylor instability

The parallel one-dimensional moving-mesh hydrodynamics code RT1D reproduces the multidimensional dynamics from Rayleigh-Taylor instability in supernova remnants.

[ascl:1607.014] SOPIE: Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation

SOPIE (Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation) provides functions to non-parametrically estimate the off-pulse interval of a source function originating from a pulsar. The technique is based on a sequential application of P-values obtained from goodness-of-fit tests for the uniform distribution, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramér-von Mises, Anderson-Darling and Rayleigh goodness-of-fit tests.

[ascl:1607.013] Kālī: Time series data modeler

The fully parallelized and vectorized software package Kālī models time series data using various stochastic processes such as continuous-time ARMA (C-ARMA) processes and uses Bayesian Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) for inferencing a stochastic light curve. Kālī is written in c++ with Python language bindings for ease of use. Kālī is named jointly after the Hindu goddess of time, change, and power and also as an acronym for KArma LIbrary.

[ascl:1607.012] ZASPE: Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator

ZASPE (Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator) computes the atmospheric stellar parameters (Teff, log(g), [Fe/H] and vsin(i)) from echelle spectra via least squares minimization with a pre-computed library of synthetic spectra. The minimization is performed only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. The uncertainities and covariances computed by ZASPE assume that the principal source of error is the systematic missmatch between the observed spectrum and the sythetic one that produces the best fit. ZASPE requires a grid of synthetic spectra and can use any pre-computed library minor modifications.

[ascl:1607.011] HfS: Hyperfine Structure fitting tool

HfS fits the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH3 (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive the NH3 column density, rotational temperature Trot, and kinetic temperature Tk. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters, with special attention to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

[ascl:1607.009] PICsar: Particle in cell pulsar magnetosphere simulator

PICsar simulates the magnetosphere of an aligned axisymmetric pulsar and can be used to simulate other arbitrary electromagnetics problems in axisymmetry. Written in Fortran, this special relativistic, electromagnetic, charge conservative particle in cell code features stretchable body-fitted coordinates that follow the surface of a sphere, simplifying the application of boundary conditions in the case of the aligned pulsar; a radiation absorbing outer boundary, which allows a steady state to be set up dynamically and maintained indefinitely from transient initial conditions; and algorithms for injection of charged particles into the simulation domain. PICsar is parallelized using MPI and has been used on research problems with ~1000 CPUs.

[ascl:1607.010] K2PS: K2 Planet search

K2PS is an Oxford K2 planet search pipeline. Written in Python, it searches for transit-like signals from the k2sc-detrended light curves.

[ascl:1607.008] BLS: Box-fitting Least Squares

BLS (Box-fitting Least Squares) is a box-fitting algorithm that analyzes stellar photometric time series to search for periodic transits of extrasolar planets. It searches for signals characterized by a periodic alternation between two discrete levels, with much less time spent at the lower level.

[ascl:1607.007] JUDE: An Utraviolet Imaging Telescope pipeline

JUDE (Jayant's UVIT Data Explorer) converts the Level 1 data (FITS binary table) from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) on ASTROSAT into three output files: a photon event list as a function of frame number (FITS binary table); a FITS image file with two extensions; and a PNG file created from the FITS image file with an automated scaling.

[ascl:1607.006] Cholla: 3D GPU-based hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulation

Cholla (Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures) models the Euler equations on a static mesh and evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously using GPUs. It can update over ten million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction, allowing computation of astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (>256^3) on a single device; calculations can be extended onto multiple devices with nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs.

[ascl:1607.005] Planetary3br: Three massive body resonance calculator

Given two planets P1 and P2 with arbitrary orbits, planetary3br calculates all possible semimajor axes that a third planet P0 can have in order for the system to be in a three body resonance; these are identified by the combination k0*P0 + k1*P1 + k2*P2. P1 and P2 are assumed to be not in an exact two-body resonance. The program also calculates three "strengths" of the resonance, one for each planet, which are only indicators of the dynamical relevance of the resonance on each planet. Sample input data are available along with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1607.004] Atlas3bgeneral: Three-body resonance calculator

For a massless test particle and given a planetary system, atlas3bgeneral calculates all three body resonances in a given range of semimajor axes with all the planets taken by pairs. Planets are assumed in fixed circular and coplanar orbits and the test particle with arbitrary orbit. A sample input data file to calculate the three-body resonances is available for use with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1607.003] Atlas2bgeneral: Two-body resonance calculator

For a massless test particle and given a planetary system, Atlas2bgeneral calculates all resonances in a given range of semimajor axes with all the planets taken one by one. Planets are assumed in fixed circular and coplanar orbits and the test particle with arbitrary orbit. A sample input data file to calculate the two-body resonances is available for use with the Fortran77 source code.

[ascl:1607.002] DICE: Disk Initial Conditions Environment

DICE models initial conditions of idealized galaxies to study their secular evolution or their more complex interactions such as mergers or compact groups using N-Body/hydro codes. The code can set up a large number of components modeling distinct parts of the galaxy, and creates 3D distributions of particles using a N-try MCMC algorithm which does not require a prior knowledge of the distribution function. The gravitational potential is then computed on a multi-level Cartesian mesh by solving the Poisson equation in the Fourier space. Finally, the dynamical equilibrium of each component is computed by integrating the Jeans equations for each particles. Several galaxies can be generated in a row and be placed on Keplerian orbits to model interactions. DICE writes the initial conditions in the Gadget1 or Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) format and is fully compatible with Ramses (ascl:1011.007).

[ascl:1607.001] AGNfitter: SED-fitting code for AGN and galaxies from a MCMC approach

AGNfitter is a fully Bayesian MCMC method to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxies from the sub-mm to the UV; it enables robust disentanglement of the physical processes responsible for the emission of sources. Written in Python, AGNfitter makes use of a large library of theoretical, empirical, and semi-empirical models to characterize both the nuclear and host galaxy emission simultaneously. The model consists of four physical emission components: an accretion disk, a torus of AGN heated dust, stellar populations, and cold dust in star forming regions. AGNfitter determines the posterior distributions of numerous parameters that govern the physics of AGN with a fully Bayesian treatment of errors and parameter degeneracies, allowing one to infer integrated luminosities, dust attenuation parameters, stellar masses, and star formation rates.

[ascl:1606.015] FLASK: Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit

FLASK (Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit) makes tomographic realizations on the sphere of an arbitrary number of correlated lognormal or Gaussian random fields; it can create joint simulations of clustering and lensing with sub-per-cent accuracy over relevant angular scales and redshift ranges. It is C++ code parallelized with OpenMP; FLASK generates fast full-sky simulations of cosmological large-scale structure observables such as multiple matter density tracers (galaxies, quasars, dark matter haloes), CMB temperature anisotropies and weak lensing convergence and shear fields. The mutiple fields can be generated tomographically in an arbitrary number of redshift slices and all their statistical properties (including cross-correlations) are determined by the angular power spectra supplied as input and the multivariate lognormal (or Gaussian) distribution assumed for the fields. Effects like redshift space distortions, doppler distortions, magnification biases, evolution and intrinsic aligments can be introduced in the simulations via the input power spectra which must be supplied by the user.

[ascl:1606.014] Lmfit: Non-Linear Least-Square Minimization and Curve-Fitting for Python

Lmfit provides a high-level interface to non-linear optimization and curve fitting problems for Python. Lmfit builds on and extends many of the optimization algorithm of scipy.optimize, especially the Levenberg-Marquardt method from optimize.leastsq. Its enhancements to optimization and data fitting problems include using Parameter objects instead of plain floats as variables, the ability to easily change fitting algorithms, and improved estimation of confidence intervals and curve-fitting with the Model class. Lmfit includes many pre-built models for common lineshapes.

[ascl:1606.013] Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

[ascl:1606.012] KMDWARFPARAM: Parameters estimator for K and M dwarf stars

KMDWARFPARAM estimates the physical parameters of a star with mass M < 0.8 M_sun given one or more observational constraints. The code runs a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo procedure to estimate the parameter values and their uncertainties.

[ascl:1606.011] FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

[ascl:1606.010] SimpLens: Interactive gravitational lensing simulator

SimpLens illustrates some of the theoretical ideas important in gravitational lensing in an interactive way. After setting parameters for elliptical mass distribution and external mass, SimpLens displays the mass profile and source position, the lens potential and image locations, and indicate the image magnifications and contours of virtual light-travel time. A lens profile can be made shallower or steeper with little change in the image positions and with only total magnification affected.

[ascl:1606.009] Companion-Finder: Planets and binary companions in time series spectra

Companion-Finder looks for planets and binary companions in time series spectra by searching for the spectral lines of stellar companions to other stars observed with high-precision radial-velocity surveys.

[ascl:1606.008] s2: Object oriented wrapper for functions on the sphere

The s2 package can represent any arbitrary function defined on the sphere. Both real space map and harmonic space spherical harmonic representations are supported. Basic sky representations have been extended to simulate full sky noise distributions and Gaussian cosmic microwave background realisations. Support for the representation and convolution of beams is also provided. The code requires HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001).

[ascl:1606.007] COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

[ascl:1606.006] uvmcmcfit: Parametric models to interferometric data fitter

Uvmcmcfit fits parametric models to interferometric data. It is ideally suited to extract the maximum amount of information from marginally resolved observations with interferometers like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). uvmcmcfit uses emcee (ascl:1303.002) to do Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and can measure the goodness of fit from visibilities rather than deconvolved images, an advantage when there is strong gravitational lensing and in other situations. uvmcmcfit includes a pure-Python adaptation of Miriad’s (ascl:1106.007) uvmodel task to generate simulated visibilities given observed visibilities and a model image and a simple ray-tracing routine that allows it to account for both strongly lensed systems (where multiple images of the lensed galaxy are detected) and weakly lensed systems (where only a single image of the lensed galaxy is detected).

[ascl:1606.005] PyMultiNest: Python interface for MultiNest

PyMultiNest provides programmatic access to MultiNest (ascl:1109.006) and PyCuba, integration existing Python code (numpy, scipy), and enables writing Prior & LogLikelihood functions in Python. PyMultiNest can plot and visualize MultiNest's progress and allows easy plotting, visualization and summarization of MultiNest results. The plotting can be run on existing MultiNest output, and when not using PyMultiNest for running MultiNest.

[ascl:1606.004] HIBAYES: Global 21-cm Bayesian Monte-Carlo Model Fitting

HIBAYES implements fully-Bayesian extraction of the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization in the presence of foreground emission. User-defined likelihood and prior functions are called by the sampler PyMultiNest (ascl:1606.005) in order to jointly explore the full (signal plus foreground) posterior probability distribution and evaluate the Bayesian evidence for a given model. Implemented models, for simulation and fitting, include gaussians (HI signal) and polynomials (foregrounds). Some simple plotting and analysis tools are supplied. The code can be extended to other models (physical or empirical), to incorporate data from other experiments, or to use alternative Monte-Carlo sampling engines as required.

[ascl:1606.003] Cygrid: Cython-powered convolution-based gridding module for Python

The Python module Cygrid grids (resamples) data to any collection of spherical target coordinates, although its typical application involves FITS maps or data cubes. The module supports the FITS world coordinate system (WCS) standard; its underlying algorithm is based on the convolution of the original samples with a 2D Gaussian kernel. A lookup table scheme allows parallelization of the code and is combined with the HEALPix tessellation of the sphere for fast neighbor searches. Cygrid's runtime scales between O(n) and O(nlog n), with n being the number of input samples.

[submitted] pyLCSIM: A python package to simulate X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models

pyLCSIM is a python package to simulate X-ray lightcurves from coherent signals and power spectrum models. Coherent signals can be specified as a sum of one or more sinusoids, each with its frequency, pulsed fraction and phase shift; or as a series of harmonics of a fundamental frequency (each with its pulsed fraction and phase shift). Power spectra can be simulated from a model of the power spectrum density (PSD), using as a template one or more of the built-in library functions. The user can also define his/her custom models. Models are additive.

[ascl:1606.002] PAL: Positional Astronomy Library

The PAL library is a partial re-implementation of Pat Wallace's popular SLALIB library written in C using a Gnu GPL license and layered on top of the IAU's SOFA library (or the BSD-licensed ERFA) where appropriate. PAL attempts to stick to the SLA C API where possible.

[ascl:1606.001] SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

[ascl:1605.017] Surprise Calculator: Estimating relative entropy and Surprise between samples

The Surprise is a measure for consistency between posterior distributions and operates in parameter space. It can be used to analyze either the compatibility of separately analyzed posteriors from two datasets, or the posteriors from a Bayesian update. The Surprise Calculator estimates relative entropy and Surprise between two samples, assuming they are Gaussian. The software requires the R package CompQuadForm to estimate the significance of the Surprise, and rpy2 to interface R with Python.

[ascl:1605.016] zeldovich-PLT: Zel'dovich approximation initial conditions generator

zeldovich-PLT generates Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) initial conditions (i.e. first-order Lagrangian perturbation theory) for cosmological N-body simulations, optionally applying particle linear theory (PLT) corrections.

[ascl:1605.015] SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

[ascl:1605.014] DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

[ascl:1605.013] grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

[ascl:1605.012] K2SC: K2 Systematics Correction

K2SC (K2 Systematics Correction) models instrumental systematics and astrophysical variability in light curves from the K2 mission. It enables the user to remove both position-dependent systematics and time-dependent variability (e.g., for transit searches) or to remove systematics while preserving variability (for variability studies). K2SC automatically computes estimates of the period, amplitude and evolution timescale of the variability for periodic variables and can be run on ASCII and FITS light curve files. Written in Python, this pipeline requires NumPy, SciPy, MPI4Py, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and George (ascl:1511.015).

[ascl:1605.011] DISCO: 3-D moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics package

DISCO evolves orbital fluid motion in two and three dimensions, especially at high Mach number, for studying astrophysical disks. The software uses a moving-mesh approach with a dynamic cylindrical mesh that can shear azimuthally to follow the orbital motion of the gas, thus removing diffusive advection errors and permitting longer timesteps than a static grid. DISCO uses an HLLD Riemann solver and a constrained transport scheme compatible with the mesh motion to implement magnetohydrodynamics.

[ascl:1605.010] TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

[ascl:1605.009] ASTRiDE: Automated Streak Detection for Astronomical Images

ASTRiDE detects streaks in astronomical images using a "border" of each object (i.e. "boundary-tracing" or "contour-tracing") and their morphological parameters. Fast moving objects such as meteors, satellites, near-Earth objects (NEOs), or even cosmic rays can leave streak-like traces in the images; ASTRiDE can detect not only long streaks but also relatively short or curved streaks.

[ascl:1605.008] PDT: Photometric DeTrending Algorithm Using Machine Learning

PDT removes systematic trends in light curves. It finds clusters of light curves that are highly correlated using machine learning, constructs one master trend per cluster and detrends an individual light curve using the constructed master trends by minimizing residuals while constraining coefficients to be positive.

[ascl:1605.007] MUSCLE: MUltiscale Spherical-ColLapse Evolution

MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution) produces low-redshift approximate N-body realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales. It applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory - 2LPT), and by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme.

[ascl:1605.006] CAMELOT: Cloud Archive for MEtadata, Library and Online Toolkit

CAMELOT facilitates the comparison of observational data and simulations of molecular clouds and/or star-forming regions. The central component of CAMELOT is a database summarizing the properties of observational data and simulations in the literature through pertinent metadata. The core functionality allows users to upload metadata, search and visualize the contents of the database to find and match observations/simulations over any range of parameter space.

To bridge the fundamental disconnect between inherently 2D observational data and 3D simulations, the code uses key physical properties that, in principle, are straightforward for both observers and simulators to measure — the surface density (Sigma), velocity dispersion (sigma) and radius (R). By determining these in a self-consistent way for all entries in the database, it should be possible to make robust comparisons.

[ascl:1605.005] TMBIDL: Single dish radio astronomy data reduction package

The IDL package reduces and analyzes radio astronomy data. It translates SDFITS files into TMBIDL format, and can average and display spectra, remove baselines, and fit Gaussian models.

[ascl:1605.004] BACCHUS: Brussels Automatic Code for Characterizing High accUracy Spectra

BACCHUS (Brussels Automatic Code for Characterizing High accUracy Spectra) derives stellar parameters (Teff, log g, metallicity, microturbulence velocity and rotational velocity), equivalent widths, and abundances. The code includes on the fly spectrum synthesis, local continuum normalization, estimation of local S/N, automatic line masking, four methods for abundance determinations, and a flagging system aiding line selection. BACCHUS relies on the grid of MARCS model atmospheres, Masseron's model atmosphere thermodynamic structure interpolator, and the radiative transfer code Turbospectrum (ascl:1205.004).

[ascl:1605.003] Shadowfax: Moving mesh hydrodynamical integration code

Shadowfax simulates galaxy evolution. Written in object-oriented modular C++, it evolves a mixture of gas, subject to the laws of hydrodynamics and gravity, and any collisionless fluid only subject to gravity, such as cold dark matter or stars. For the hydrodynamical integration, it makes use of a (co-) moving Lagrangian mesh. The code has a 2D and 3D version, contains utility programs to generate initial conditions and visualize simulation snapshots, and its input/output is compatible with a number of other simulation codes, e.g. Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) and GIZMO (ascl:1410.003).

[ascl:1605.002] cluster-lensing: Tools for calculating properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters

The cluster-lensing package calculates properties and weak lensing profiles of galaxy clusters. Implemented in Python, it includes cluster mass-richness and mass-concentration scaling relations, and NFW halo profiles for weak lensing shear, the differential surface mass density ΔΣ(r), and for magnification, Σ(r). Optionally the calculation will include the effects of cluster miscentering offsets.

[submitted] Corrfunc: Blazing fast correlation functions on the CPU

Corrfunc is a suite of high-performance clustering routines. The code can compute a variety of spatial correlation functions on Cartesian geometry as well Landy-Szalay calculations for spatial and angular correlation functions on a spherical geometry. The code-base is very well-tested and has been already used in a few papers exploring the galaxy-halo connection.

The code is written in C and can be used on the command-line, through the supplied python extensions, or the C API.

[ascl:1605.001] MARZ: Redshifting Program

MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

[ascl:1604.012] TTVFaster: First order eccentricity transit timing variations (TTVs)

TTVFaster implements analytic formulae for transit time variations (TTVs) that are accurate to first order in the planet–star mass ratios and in the orbital eccentricities; the implementations are available in several languages, including IDL, Julia, Python and C. These formulae compare well with more computationally expensive N-body integrations in the low-eccentricity, low mass-ratio regime when applied to simulated and to actual multi-transiting Kepler planet systems.

[ascl:1604.011] FDPS: Framework for Developing Particle Simulators

FDPS provides the necessary functions for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as templates independent of the data structure of particles and the functional form of the interaction. It is used to develop particle-based simulation programs for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. FDPS includes templates for domain decomposition, redistribution of particles, and gathering of particle information for interaction calculation. It uses algorithms such as Barnes-Hut tree method for long-range interactions; methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are used for short-range interactions. FDPS reduces the time and effort necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N^2) calculation cost, and produces compiled programs that will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers.

[ascl:1604.009] CCSNMultivar: Core-Collapse Supernova Gravitational Waves

CCSNMultivar aids the analysis of core-collapse supernova gravitational waves. It includes multivariate regression of Fourier transformed or time domain waveforms, hypothesis testing for measuring the influence of physical parameters, and the Abdikamalov et. al. catalog for example use. CCSNMultivar can optionally incorporate additional uncertainty due to detector noise and approximate waveforms from anywhere within the parameter space.

[ascl:1604.008] The Tractor: Probabilistic astronomical source detection and measurement

The Tractor optimizes or samples from models of astronomical objects. The approach is generative: given astronomical sources and a description of the image properties, the code produces pixel-space estimates or predictions of what will be observed in the images. This estimate can be used to produce a likelihood for the observed data given the model: assuming the model space actually includes the truth (it doesn’t, in detail), then if we had the optimal model parameters, the predicted image would differ from the actually observed image only by noise. Given a noise model of the instrument and assuming pixelwise independent noise, the log-likelihood is the negative chi-squared difference: (image - model) / noise.

[ascl:1604.007] DNest3: Diffusive Nested Sampling

DNest3 is a C++ implementation of Diffusive Nested Sampling (ascl:1010.029), a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for Bayesian Inference and Statistical Mechanics. Relative to older DNest versions, DNest3 has improved performance (in terms of the sampling overhead, likelihood evaluations still dominate in general) and is cleaner code: implementing new models should be easier than it was before. In addition, DNest3 is multi-threaded, so one can run multiple MCMC walkers at the same time, and the results will be combined together.

[ascl:1604.006] 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

[ascl:1604.005] Halotools: Galaxy-Halo connection models

Halotools builds and tests models of the galaxy-halo connection and analyzes catalogs of dark matter halos. The core functions of the package include fast generation of synthetic galaxy populations using HODs, abundance matching, and related methods; efficient algorithms for calculating galaxy clustering, lensing, z-space distortions, and other astronomical statistics; a modular, object-oriented framework for designing galaxy evolution models; and end-to-end support for reducing halo catalogs and caching them as hdf5 files.

[ascl:1604.004] magicaxis: Pretty scientific plotting with minor-tick and log minor-tick support

The R suite magicaxis makes useful and pretty plots for scientific plotting and includes functions for base plotting, with particular emphasis on pretty axis labelling in a number of circumstances that are often used in scientific plotting. It also includes functions for generating images and contours that reflect the 2D quantile levels of the data designed particularly for output of MCMC posteriors where visualizing the location of the 68% and 95% 2D quantiles for covariant parameters is a necessary part of the post MCMC analysis, can generate low and high error bars, and allows clipping of values, rejection of bad values, and log stretching.

[ascl:1604.003] LAMBDAR: Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R

LAMBDAR measures galaxy fluxes from an arbitrary FITS image, covering an arbitrary photometric wave-band, when provided all parameters needed to construct galactic apertures at the required locations for multi-band matched aperture galactic photometry. Through sophisticated matched aperture photometry, the package develops robust Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and accurately establishes the physical properties of galactic objects. LAMBDAR was based on a package detailed in Bourne et al. (2012) that determined galactic fluxes in low resolution Herschel images.

[ascl:1604.002] libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

[submitted] PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE

PHOTOMETRYPIPELINE provides calibrated photometry from imaging data obtained with small to medium-sized observatories. PP is coded in Python 2.7 and uses freely available data processing software, namely Source Extractor and SCAMP, to register the image data and perform aperture photometry. Calibration is obtained through matching of field stars with reliable photometric catalogs. PP has been specifically designed for the measurement of asteroid photometry, but it can also be used to obtain photometry of fixed sources.

[ascl:1604.001] OpenMHD: Godunov-type code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

OpenMHD is a Godunov-type finite-volume code for ideal/resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). It is written in Fortran 90 and is parallelized by using MPI-2 and OpenMP. The code was originally developed for studying magnetic reconnection problems and has been made publicly available in the hope that others may find it useful.

[ascl:1603.018] PolRadTran: Polarized Radiative Transfer Model Distribution

PolRadTran is a plane-parallel polarized radiative transfer model. It is used to compute the radiance exiting a vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere containing randomly-oriented particles. Both solar and thermal sources of radiation are considered. A direct method of incorporating the polarized scattering information is combined with the doubling and adding method to produce a relatively simple formulation.

[ascl:1603.017] HIIexplorer: Detect and extract integrated spectra of HII regions

HIIexplorer detects and extracts the integrated spectra of HII regions from IFS datacubes. The procedure assumes H ii regions are peaky/isolated structures with a strong ionized gas emission, clearly above the continuum emission and the average ionized gas emission across the galaxy and that H ii regions have a typical physical size of about a hundred or a few hundreds of parsecs, which corresponds to a typical projected size at the distance of the galaxies of a few arcsec for galaxies at z~0.016. All input parameters can be derived from either a visual inspection and/or a statistical analysis of the Hα emission line map. The algorithm produces a segmentation FITS file describing the pixels associated to each H ii region.

[ascl:1603.016] ellc: Light curve model for eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

ellc analyzes the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems. The model represents stars as triaxial ellipsoids, and the apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The code can also calculate the fluxweighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). ellc can model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and can enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing.

[ascl:1603.015] Dedalus: Flexible framework for spectrally solving differential equations

Dedalus solves differential equations using spectral methods. It is designed to solve initial-value, boundary-value, and eigenvalue problems involving nearly arbitrary equations sets and implements a highly flexible spectral framework that can simulate many domains and custom equations. Its primary features include symbolic equation entry, spectral domain discretization, multidimensional parallelization, implicit-explicit timestepping, and flexible analysis with HDF5. The code is written primarily in Python and features an easy-to-use interface, including text-based equation entry. The numerical algorithm produces highly sparse systems for a wide variety of equations on spectrally-discretized domains; these systems are efficiently solved by Dedalus using compiled libraries and multidimensional parallelization through MPI.

[ascl:1603.014] fibmeasure: Python/Cython module to find the center of back-illuminated optical fibers in metrology images

fibmeasure finds the precise locations of the centers of back-illuminated optical fibers in images. It was developed for astronomical fiber positioning feedback via machine vision cameras and is optimized for high-magnification images where fibers appear as resolvable circles. It was originally written during the design of the WEAVE pick-and-place fiber positioner for the William Herschel Telescope.

[ascl:1603.013] PyGSM: Python interface to the Global Sky Model

PyGSM is a Python interface for the Global Sky Model (GSM, ascl:1011.010). The GSM is a model of diffuse galactic radio emission, constructed from a variety of all-sky surveys spanning the radio band (e.g. Haslam and WMAP). PyGSM uses the GSM to generate all-sky maps in Healpix format of diffuse Galactic radio emission from 10 MHz to 94 GHz. The PyGSM module provides visualization utilities, file output in FITS format, and the ability to generate observed skies for a given location and date. PyGSM requires Healpy, PyEphem (ascl:1112.014), and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1603.012] tpipe: Searching radio interferometry data for fast, dispersed transients

Visibilities from radio interferometers have not traditionally been used to study the fast transient sky. Millisecond transients (e.g., fast radio bursts) and periodic sources (e.g., pulsars) have been studied with single-dish radio telescopes and a software stack developed over the past few decades. tpipe is an initial attempt to develop the fast transient algorithms for visibility data. Functions exist for analysis of visibilties, such as reading data, flagging data, applying interferometric gain calibration, and imaging. These functions are given equal footing as time-domain techniques like filters and dedispersion.

[ascl:1603.011] DiskJockey: Protoplanetary disk modeling for dynamical mass derivation

DiskJockey derives dynamical masses for T Tauri stars using the Keplerian motion of their circumstellar disks, applied to radio interferometric data from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The package relies on RADMC-3D (ascl:1202.015) to perform the radiative transfer of the disk model. DiskJockey is designed to work in a parallel environment where the calculations for each frequency channel can be distributed to independent processors. Due to the computationally expensive nature of the radiative synthesis, fitting sizable datasets (e.g., SMA and ALMA) will require a substantial amount of CPU cores to explore a posterior distribution in a reasonable timeframe.

[ascl:1603.010] ExoPriors: Accounting for observational bias of transiting exoplanets

ExoPriors calculates a log-likelihood penalty for an input set of transit parameters to account for observational bias (geometric and signal-to-noise ratio detection bias) of transiting exoplanets. Written in Python, the code calculates this log-likelihood penalty in one of seven user-specified cases specified with Boolean input parameters for geometric and/or SNR bias, grazing or non-grazing events, and occultation events.

[ascl:1603.009] Asfgrid: Asteroseismic parameters for a star

asfgrid computes asteroseismic parameters for a star with given stellar parameters and vice versa. Written in Python, it determines delta_nu, nu_max or masses via interpolation over a grid.

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