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[ascl:1511.016] JKTLD: Limb darkening coefficients

JKTLD outputs theoretically-calculated limb darkening (LD) strengths for equations (LD laws) which predict the amount of LD as a function of the part of the star being observed. The coefficients of these laws are obtained by bilinear interpolation (in effective temperature and surface gravity) in published tables of coefficients calculated from stellar model atmospheres by several researchers. Many observations of stars require the strength of limb darkening (LD) to be estimated, which can be done using theoretical models of stellar atmospheres; JKTLD can help in these circumstances.

[ascl:1511.015] George: Gaussian Process regression

George is a fast and flexible library, implemented in C++ with Python bindings, for Gaussian Process regression useful for accounting for correlated noise in astronomical datasets, including those for transiting exoplanet discovery and characterization and stellar population modeling.

[ascl:1511.014] HumVI: Human Viewable Image creation

HumVI creates a composite color image from sets of input FITS files, following the Lupton et al (2004, ascl:1511.013) composition algorithm. Written in Python, it takes three FITS files as input and returns a color composite, color-saturated png image with an arcsinh stretch. HumVI reads the zero points out of the FITS headers and uses them to put all the images on the same flux scale; photometrically calibrated images produce the best results.

[ascl:1511.013] CCDtoRGB: RGB image production from three-band atronomical images

CCDtoRGB produces red‐green‐blue (RGB) composites from three‐band astronomical images, ensuring an object with a specified astronomical color has a unique color in the RGB image rather than burnt‐out white stars. Use of an arcsinh stretch shows faint objects while simultaneously preserving the structure of brighter objects in the field, such as the spiral arms of large galaxies.

[ascl:1511.012] milkywayproject_triggering: Correlation functions for two catalog datasets

This triggering code calculates the correlation function between two astrophysical data catalogs using the Landy-Szalay approximator generalized for heterogeneous datasets (Landy & Szalay, 1993; Bradshaw et al, 2011) or the auto-correlation function of one dataset. It assumes that one catalog has positional information as well as an object size (effective radius), and the other only positional information.

[ascl:1511.011] SparsePZ: Sparse Representation of Photometric Redshift PDFs

SparsePZ uses sparse basis representation to fully represent individual photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs). This approach requires approximately half the parameters for the same multi-Gaussian fitting accuracy, and has the additional advantage that an entire PDF can be stored by using a 4-byte integer per basis function. Only 10-20 points per galaxy are needed to reconstruct both the individual PDFs and the ensemble redshift distribution, N(z), to an accuracy of 99.9 per cent when compared to the one built using the original PDFs computed with a resolution of δz = 0.01, reducing the required storage of 200 original values by a factor of 10-20. This basis representation can be directly extended to a cosmological analysis, thereby increasing computational performance without losing resolution or accuracy.

[ascl:1511.010] Galileon-Solver: N-body code

Galileon-Solver adds an extra force to PMCode (ascl:9909.001) using a modified Poisson equation to provide a non-linearly transformed density field, with the operations all performed in real space. The code's implicit spherical top-hat assumption only works over fairly long distance averaging scales, where the coarse-grained picture it relies on is a good approximation of reality; it uses discrete Fourier transforms and cyclic reduction in the usual way.

[submitted] DES exposure checker

We have developed a crowdsourcing web application for image quality control employed by the Dark Energy Survey. Dubbed the "DES exposure checker", it renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes. Users can also generate custom labels and thus help identify previously unknown problem classes. User reports are fed back to hardware and software experts to help mitigate and eliminate recognized issues. We report on the implementation of the application and our experience with its over 100 users, the majority of which are professional or prospective astronomers but not data management experts. We discuss aspects of user training and engagement, and demonstrate how problem reports have been pivotal to rapidly correct artifacts which would likely have been too subtle or infrequent to be recognized oth- erwise. We conclude with a number of important lessons learned, suggest possible improvements, and recommend this collective exploratory approach for future astronomical surveys or other extensive data sets with a sufficiently large user base. We also release open-source code of the web application and host an online demo version at

[submitted] ALFA: Automated Line Fitting Algorithm

ALFA fits emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. It uses a catalogue of lines which may be present to construct synthetic spectra, the parameters of which are then optimised by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC.

[submitted] T-PHOT: PSF-matched, prior-based, multiwavelength extragalactic deconfusion photometry

T-PHOT extracts accurate photometry from low-resolution images of extragalactic fields, where the blending of sources can be a serious problem for accurate and unbiased measurement of fluxes and colors. It gathers data from a high-resolution image of a region of the sky and uses the source positions and morphologies to obtain priors for the photometric analysis of the lower resolution image of the same field. T-PHOT handles different types of datasets as input priors, including a list of objects that will be used to obtain cutouts from the real high-resolution image, a set of analytical models (as .fits stamps), and a list of unresolved, point-like sources, useful for example for far-infrared wavelength domains. T-PHOT yields accurate estimations of fluxes within the intrinsic uncertainties of the method when systematic errors are taken into account (which can be done using a flagging code given in the output). T-PHOT is many times faster than similar codes like TFIT and CONVPHOT and works well for the analysis of large datasets; it handles multiwavelength optical to far-infrared image photometry. T-PHOT was developed as part of the ASTRODEEP project (

[ascl:1511.009] Pangloss: Reconstructing lensing mass

Pangloss reconstructs all the mass within a light cone through the Universe. Understanding complex mass distributions like this is important for accurate time delay lens cosmography, and also for accurate lens magnification estimation. It aspires to use all available data in an attempt to make the best of all mass maps.

[ascl:1511.008] MCAL: M dwarf metallicity and temperature calculator

MCAL calculates high precision metallicities and effective temperatures for M dwarfs; the method behaves properly down to R = 40 000 and S/N = 25, and results were validated against a sample of stars in common with SOPHIE high resolution spectra.

[ascl:1511.007] MHF: MLAPM Halo Finder

MHF is a Dark Matter halo finder that is based on the refinement grids of MLAPM. The grid structure of MLAPM adaptively refines around high-density regions with an automated refinement algorithm, thus naturally "surrounding" the Dark Matter halos, as they are simply manifestations of over-densities within (and exterior) to the underlying host halo. Using this grid structure, MHF restructures the hierarchy of nested isolated MLAPM grids into a "grid tree". The densest cell in the end of a tree branch marks center of a prospective Dark Matter halo. All gravitationally bound particles about this center are collected to obtain the final halo catalog. MHF automatically finds halos within halos within halos.

[ascl:1511.006] T-Matrix: Codes for Computing Electromagnetic Scattering by Nonspherical and Aggregated Particles

The T-Matrix package includes codes to compute electromagnetic scattering by homogeneous, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles in fixed and random orientations, randomly oriented two-sphere clusters with touching or separated components, and multi-sphere clusters in fixed and random orientations. All codes are written in Fortran-77. LAPACK-based, extended-precision, Gauss-elimination- and NAG-based, and superposition codes are available, as are double-precision superposition, parallelized double-precision, double-precision Lorenz-Mie codes, and codes for the computation of the coefficients for the generalized Chebyshev shape.

[ascl:1511.005] pyhrs: Spectroscopic data reduction package for SALT

The pyhrs package reduces data from the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). HRS is a dual-beam, fiber fed echelle spectrectrograph with four modes of operation: low (R~16000), medium (R~34000), high (R~65000), and high stability (R~65000). pyhrs, written in Python, includes all of the steps necessary to reduce HRS low, medium, and high resolution data; this includes basic CCD reductions, order identification, wavelength calibration, and extraction of the spectra.

[ascl:1511.004] Xgremlin: Interferograms and spectra from Fourier transform spectrometers analysis

Xgremlin is a hardware and operating system independent version of the data analysis program Gremlin used for Fourier transform spectrometry. Xgremlin runs on PCs and workstations that use the X11 window system, including cygwin in Windows. It is used to Fourier transform interferograms, plot spectra, perform phase corrections, perform intensity and wavenumber calibration, and find and fit spectral lines. It can also be used to construct synthetic spectra, subtract continua, compare several different spectra, and eliminate ringing around lines.

[ascl:1511.003] SkyView Virtual Telescope

The SkyView Virtual telescope provides access to survey datasets ranging from radio through the gamma-ray regimes. Over 100 survey datasets are currently available. The SkyView library referenced here is used as the basis for the SkyView web site (at but is designed for individual use by researchers as well.

SkyView's approach to access surveys is distinct from most other toolkits. Rather than providing links to the original data, SkyView attempts to immediately re-render the source data in the user-requested reference frame, projection, scaling, orientation, etc. The library includes a set of geometry transformation and mosaicking tools that may be integrated into other applications independent of SkyView.

[ascl:1511.002] JSPAM: Interacting galaxies modeller

JSPAM models galaxy collisions using a restricted n-body approach to speed up computation. Instead of using a softened point-mass potential, the software supports a modified version of the three component potential created by Hernquist (1994, ApJS 86, 389). Although spherically symmetric gravitationally potentials and a Gaussian model for the bulge are used to increase computational efficiency, the potential mimics that of a fully consistent n-body model of a galaxy. Dynamical friction has been implemented in the code to improve the accuracy of close approaches between galaxies. Simulations using this code using thousands of particles over the typical interaction times of a galaxy interaction take a few seconds on modern desktop workstations, making it ideal for rapidly prototyping the dynamics of colliding galaxies. Extensive testing of the code has shown that it produces nearly identical tidal features to those from hierarchical tree codes such as Gadget but using a fraction of the computational resources. This code was used in the Galaxy Zoo: Mergers project and is very well suited for automated fitting of galaxy mergers with automated pattern fitting approaches such as genetic algorithms. Java and Fortran versions of the code are available.

[ascl:1511.001] SuperFreq: Numerical determination of fundamental frequencies of an orbit

SuperFreq numerically estimates the fundamental frequencies and orbital actions of pre-computed orbital time series. It is an implementation of a version of the Numerical Analysis of Fundamental Frequencies close to that by Monica Valluri in NAFF, which itself is an implementation of an algorithm first used by Jacques Laskar.

[ascl:1510.007] ccdproc: CCD data reduction software

Ccdproc is an affiliated package for the AstroPy package for basic data reductions of CCD images. The ccdproc package provides many of the necessary tools for processing of ccd images built on a framework to provide error propagation and bad pixel tracking throughout the reduction process.

[submitted] Xsmurf - Measuring multifractal properties with the continuous wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method

Xsmurf is a software package written in C/Tcl/Tk that implements the continuous wavelet transform modulus maxima method, an image processing tool for measuring fractal and multifractal properties in experimental and simulation data.
Multifractal analysis is described in the following page:

Xsmurf has been used in multiple applications in astrophysics, e.g. :
- analysis of solar magnetograms for characterizing complexity of evolving regions
- fractal/multifractal nature and anisotropic structure of Galactic atomic hydrogen (H I)
- analysis of simulation data (velocity field, ...) of turbulent flow

[ascl:1510.006] ASPIC: STARLINK image processing package

ASPIC handled basic astronomical image processing. Early releases concentrated on image arithmetic, standard filters, expansion/contraction/selection/combination of images, and displaying and manipulating images on the ARGS and other devices. Later releases added new astronomy-specific applications to this sound framework. The ASPIC collection of about 400 image-processing programs was written using the Starlink "interim" environment in the 1980; the software is now obsolete.

[submitted] GPC – General Polygon Clipper library

The University of Manchester GPC library is a flexible and highly robust polygon set operations library for use with C, C#, Delphi, Java, Perl, Python, Haskell, Lua, VB.Net (and other) applications. It's features are:
Difference, intersection, exclusive-or and union clip operations are supported.
Polygons may be comprised of multiple disjoint contours.
Contour vertices may be given in any order - clockwise or anticlockwise.
Contours may be convex, concave or self-intersecting.
Contours may be nested (i.e. polygons may have holes).
Output may take the form of either polygon contours or tristrips.
Hole and external contours are differentiated in the result.
Coincident edges and degenerate regions are handled correctly.

[submitted] Ramses-GPU

RamsesGPU is a reimplementation of the RAMSES code (Teyssier2002, Fromang2006), a grid-based hydrodynamics and MHD solver, by dropping the Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) features in order to focus software optimization efforts on 3D uniform grid algorithms for modern Graphics Processor units (GPU).

RamsesGPU provides an very efficient C++/CUDA/MPI software implementation of a second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver for compressible hydrodynamics as a a magnetohydrodynamics solver based on the constraint transport technique. Other useful modules includes static gravity, dissipative terms (viscosity, resistivity), forcing source term for turbulence studies. A special care has been devoted to parallel input/output performance by using state-of-the-art libraries like HDF5 and parallel-netcdf for which effective performance were benchmarked of the OLCF/Titan supercomputer.

The primary goal in developing RamsesGPU was to provide an efficient software package for astrophysics applications that do not necessarily need AMR features but require a very large number of integration time steps. The very first application targeted by RamsesGPU was the simulation of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) with the shearing-box approximation framework. This instability is involved in accretion disk dynamics studies since it generates turbulent flows and thus provides enhanced angular momentum transport needed for accretion to proceed on realistic timescales.

[submitted] allantools: Allen deviation calculation

allantools calculates Allan deviation and related time & frequency statistics. The library is written in Python and has a GPL v3+ license. It takes input data that is either evenly spaced observations of either fractional frequency, or phase in seconds. Deviations are calculated for given tau values in seconds. Several noise generators for creating synthetic datasets are also included.

[submitted] EDRSX -- Extensions to the EDRS package

This is an extension to the EDRS package. It was originally produced to make possible more versatile analysis of IRAS images than was otherwise available. EDRSX provides facilities for converting images into and out of EDRS format, accessing RA and DEC information stored with IRAS images, and for doing several standard image processing operations such as displaying image histograms and statistics, Fourier transforms, etc. These enable such operations to be performed as estimation and subtraction of non-linear backgrounds, de-striping of IRAS images, modelling of image features, easy aligning of separate images, etc.

[submitted] EDRS -- Electronography Data Reduction System

A package designed for the reduction and analysis of large format astronomical images, written to be used from within ASPIC. In its original form it specialised in the reduction of electronographic data but was built around a set of utility programs which were widely applicable to astronomical images from other sources. The programs align and calibrate images, handle lists of (X,Y) positions, apply linear geometrical transformations and do some stellar photometry.

This package is obsolete.

[ascl:1510.005] GALFORM: Galactic modeling

GALFORM is a semi-analytic model for calculating the formation and evolution of galaxies in hierarchical clustering cosmologies. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm to follow the merging evolution of dark matter haloes with arbitrary mass resolution, it incorporates realistic descriptions of the density profiles of dark matter haloes and the gas they contain. It follows the chemical evolution of gas and stars, and the associated production of dust and includes a detailed calculation of the sizes of discs and spheroids.

[ascl:1510.004] DEBiL: Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter

DEBiL rapidly fits a large number of light curves to a simple model. It is the central component of a pipeline for systematically identifying and analyzing eclipsing binaries within a large dataset of light curves; the results of DEBiL can be used to flag light curves of interest for follow-up analysis.

[ascl:1510.003] PyLDTk: Python toolkit for calculating stellar limb darkening profiles and model-specific coefficients for arbitrary filters

PyLDTk automates the calculation of custom stellar limb darkening (LD) profiles and model-specific limb darkening coefficients (LDC) using the library of PHOENIX-generated specific intensity spectra by Husser et al. (2013). It facilitates exoplanet transit light curve modeling, especially transmission spectroscopy where the modeling is carried out for custom narrow passbands. PyLDTk construct model-specific priors on the limb darkening coefficients prior to the transit light curve modeling. It can also be directly integrated into the log posterior computation of any pre-existing transit modeling code with minimal modifications to constrain the LD model parameter space directly by the LD profile, allowing for the marginalization over the whole parameter space that can explain the profile without the need to approximate this constraint by a prior distribution. This is useful when using a high-order limb darkening model where the coefficients are often correlated, and the priors estimated from the tabulated values usually fail to include these correlations.

[ascl:1510.002] batman: BAsic Transit Model cAlculatioN in Python

batman provides fast calculation of exoplanet transit light curves and supports calculation of light curves for any radially symmetric stellar limb darkening law. It uses an integration algorithm for models that cannot be quickly calculated analytically, and in typical use, the batman Python package can calculate a million model light curves in well under ten minutes for any limb darkening profile.

[ascl:1510.001] GGADT: Generalized Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory

GGADT uses anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) to compute the differential scattering cross section (or the total cross sections as a function of energy) for a specified grain of arbitrary geometry (natively supports spheres, ellipsoids, and clusters of spherical monomers). It is written in Fortran 95. ADT is valid when the grain is large compared to the wavelength of incident light. GGADT can calculate either the integrated cross sections (absorption, scattering, extinction) as a function of energy, or it can calculate the differential scattering cross section as a function of scattering angle.

[submitted] A Python Code for the Emmanoulopoulos et al. (2013) Light Curve Simulation Algorithm

The production of artificial light curves with known statistical and variability properties is of great importance in astrophysics. Consolidating the confidence levels during cross-correlation studies, understanding the artefacts induced by sampling irregularities, establishing detection limits for future observatories are just some of the applications of simulated data sets. Currently, the widely used methodology of amplitude and phase randomisation is able to produce artificial light curves which have a given underlying power spectral density (PSD) but which are strictly Gaussian distributed. This restriction is a significant limitation, since the majority of the light curves e.g. active galactic nuclei, X-ray binaries, gamma-ray bursts show strong deviations from Gaussianity exhibiting `burst-like' events in their light curves yielding long-tailed probability distribution functions (PDFs). In this study we propose a simple method which is able to precisely reproduce light curves which match both the PSD and the PDF of either an observed light curve or a theoretical model. The PDF can be representative of either the parent distribution or the actual distribution of the observed data, depending on the study to be conducted for a given source. The final artificial light curves contain all of the statistical and variability properties of the observed source or theoretical model i.e. same PDF and PSD, respectively. Within the framework of Reproducible Research, the code, together with the illustrative example used in this manuscript, are both made publicly available in the form of an interactive Mathematica notebook.

[ascl:1509.010] PyCS : Python Curve Shifting

PyCS is a software toolbox to estimate time delays between multiple images of strongly lensed quasars, from resolved light curves such as obtained by the COSMOGRAIL monitoring program. The pycs package defines a collection of classes and high level functions, that you can script in a flexible way. PyCS makes it easy to compare different point estimators (including your own) without much code integration. The package heavily depends on numpy, scipy, and matplotlib.

[ascl:1509.009] OPERA: Objective Prism Enhanced Reduction Algorithms

OPERA (Objective Prism Enhanced Reduction Algorithms) automatically analyzes astronomical images using the objective-prism (OP) technique to register thousands of low resolution spectra in large areas. It detects objects in an image, extracts one-dimensional spectra, and identifies the emission line feature. The main advantages of this method are: 1) to avoid subjectivity inherent to visual inspection used in past studies; and 2) the ability to obtain physical parameters without follow-up spectroscopy.

[ascl:1509.008] GFARGO: FARGO for GPU

GFARGO is a GPU version of FARGO. It is written in C and C for CUDA and runs only on NVIDIA’s graphics cards. Though it corresponds to the standard, isothermal version of FARGO, not all functionnalities of the CPU version have been translated to CUDA. The code is available in single and double precision versions, the latter compatible with FERMI architectures. GFARGO can run on a graphics card connected to the display, allowing the user to see in real time how the fields evolve.

[ascl:1509.007] pycola: N-body COLA method code

pycola is a multithreaded Python/Cython N-body code, implementing the Comoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method in the temporal and spatial domains, which trades accuracy at small-scales to gain computational speed without sacrificing accuracy at large scales. This is especially useful for cheaply generating large ensembles of accurate mock halo catalogs required to study galaxy clustering and weak lensing. The COLA method achieves its speed by calculating the large-scale dynamics exactly using LPT while letting the N-body code solve for the small scales, without requiring it to capture exactly the internal dynamics of halos.

[ascl:1509.006] FARGO3D: Hydrodynamics/magnetohydrodynamics code

A successor of FARGO (ascl:1102.017), FARGO3D is a versatile HD/MHD code that runs on clusters of CPUs or GPUs, with special emphasis on protoplanetary disks. FARGO3D offers Cartesian, cylindrical or spherical geometry; 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional calculations; and orbital advection (aka FARGO) for HD and MHD calculations. As in FARGO, a simple Runge-Kutta N-body solver may be used to describe the orbital evolution of embedded point-like objects. There is no need to know CUDA; users can develop new functions in C and have them translated to CUDA automatically to run on GPUs.

[ascl:1509.005] TRUVOT: True Background Technique for the Swift UVOT Grisms

TRUVOT decontaminates Swift UVOT grism spectra for transient objects. The technique makes use of template images in a process similar to image subtraction.

[ascl:1509.004] FalconIC: Initial conditions generator for cosmological N-body simulations in Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified theories

FalconIC generates discrete particle positions, velocities, masses and pressures based on linear Boltzmann solutions that are computed by libraries such as CLASS and CAMB. FalconIC generates these initial conditions for any species included in the selection, including Baryons, Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy fluids. Any species can be set in Eulerian (on a fixed grid) or Lagrangian (particle motion) representation, depending on the gauge and reality chosen. That is, for relativistic initial conditions in the synchronous comoving gauge, Dark Matter can only be described in an Eulerian representation. For all other choices (Relativistic in Longitudinal gauge, Newtonian with relativistic expansion rates, Newtonian without any notion of radiation), all species can be treated in all representations. The code also computes spectra. FalconIC is useful for comparative studies on initial conditions.

[ascl:1509.003] AFR (ASPFitsReader): A pulsar FITS file reader and analysis package

AFR, or ASPFitsReader, reduces, processes, and manipulates pulsar data, including calibration, template profile creation, and interactive excision of radio frequency interference from pulsar profile data. It also creates times-of-arrival compatible with Tempo (ascl:1509.002) and Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) timing software.

[ascl:1509.002] Tempo: Pulsar timing data analysis

Tempo analyzes pulsar timing data. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs), pulsar model parameters, and coded instructions are read from one or more input files. The TOAs are fitted by a pulse timing model incorporating transformation to the solar-system barycenter, pulsar rotation and spin-down and, where necessary, one of several binary models. Program output includes parameter values and uncertainties, residual pulse arrival times, chi-squared statistics, and the covariance matrix of the model. In prediction mode, ephemerides of pulse phase behavior (in the form of polynomial expansions) are calculated from input timing models. Tempo is the basis for the Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) code.

[submitted] KAULAKYS: Inelastic collisions between hydrogen atoms and Rydberg atoms

Code to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic collisions between Rydberg atoms and hydrogen atoms according to the free electron model of Kaulakys (1986, 1991). Written in IDL, and requires the code MSWAVEF to calculate momentum-space wavefunctions. Examples of how the code can be used to calculate data are provided for Li and Na. The code could be easily adapted to collisions with perturbers other than hydrogen atoms by providing the appropriate scattering amplitudes.

[ascl:1509.001] XSHPipelineManager: Wrapper for the VLT/X-shooter Data Reduction Pipeline

XSHPipelineManager provides a framework for reducing spectroscopic observations taken by the X-shooter spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. This Python code wraps recipes developed by the European Southern Observatory and runs the full X-shooter data reduction pipeline. The code offers full flexibility in terms of what data reduction recipes to include and which calibration files to use. During the data reduction chain restart-files are saved, making it possible to restart at any step in the chain.

[submitted] MSWAVEF: Momentum-Space Wavefunctions

MSWAVEF calculates hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic momentum-space electronic wavefunctions. Such wavefunctions are often required to calculate various collision processes, such as excitation and line broadening cross sections. The hydrogenic functions are calculated using the standard analytical expressions. The non-hydrogenic functions are calculated within quantum defect theory according to the method of Hoang Binh and van Regemorter (1997). Required Hankel transforms have been determined analytically for angular momentum quantum numbers ranging from zero to 13 using Mathematica. Calculations for higher angular momentum quantum numbers are possible, but slow. The code is written in IDL.

[ascl:1508.010] SHDOM: Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method for atmospheric radiative transfer

The Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method (SHDOM) radiative transfer model computes polarized monochromatic or spectral band radiative transfer in a one, two, or three-dimensional medium for either collimated solar and/or thermal emission sources of radiation. The model is written in a variant of Fortran 77 and in Fortran90 and requires a Fortran 90 compiler. Also included are programs for generating the optical property files input to SHDOM from physical properties of water cloud particles and aerosols.

[ascl:1508.009] Trilogy: FITS image conversion software

Trilogy automatically scales and combines FITS images to produce color or grayscale images using Python scripts. The user assigns images to each color channel (RGB) or a single image to grayscale luminosity. Trilogy determines the intensity scaling automatically and independently in each channel to display faint features without saturating bright features. Each channel's scaling is determined based on a sample of the image (or summed images) and two input parameters. One parameter sets the output luminosity of "the noise," currently determined as 1-sigma above the sigma-clipped mean. The other parameter sets what fraction of the data (if any) in the sample region should be allowed to saturate. Default values for these parameters (0.15% and 0.001%, respectively) work well, but the user is able to adjust them. The scaling is accomplished using the logarithmic function y = a log(kx + 1) clipped between 0 and 1, where a and k are constants determined based on the data and desired scaling parameters as described above.

[ascl:1508.008] NGMIX: Gaussian mixture models for 2D images

NGMIX implements Gaussian mixture models for 2D images. Both the PSF profile and the galaxy are modeled using mixtures of Gaussians. Convolutions are thus performed analytically, resulting in fast model generation as compared to methods that perform the convolution in Fourier space. For the galaxy model, NGMIX supports exponential disks and de Vaucouleurs and Sérsic profiles; these are implemented approximately as a sum of Gaussians using the fits from Hogg & Lang (2013). Additionally, any number of Gaussians can be fit, either completely free or constrained to be cocentric and co-elliptical.

[ascl:1508.007] TreeCorr: Two-point correlation functions

TreeCorr efficiently computes two-point correlation functions. It can compute correlations of regular number counts, weak lensing shears, or scalar quantities such as convergence or CMB temperature fluctuations. Two-point correlations may be auto-correlations or cross-correlations, including any combination of shear, kappa, and counts. Two-point functions can be done with correct curved-sky calculation using RA, Dec coordinates, on a Euclidean tangent plane, or in 3D using RA, Dec and a distance. The front end is written in Python, which can be used as a Python module or as a standalone executable using configuration files; the actual computation of the correlation functions is done in C++ using ball trees (similar to kd trees), making the calculation extremely efficient, and when available, OpenMP is used to run in parallel on multi-core machines.

[ascl:1508.006] SExSeg: SExtractor segmentation

SExSeg forces SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) to run using a pre-defined segmentation map (the definition of objects and their borders). The defined segments double as isophotal apertures. SExSeg alters the detection image based on a pre-defined segmenation map while preparing your "analysis image" by subtracting the background in a separate SExtractor run (using parameters you specify). SExtractor is then run in "double-image" mode with the altered detection image and background-subtracted analysis image.

[ascl:1508.005] ColorPro: PSF-corrected aperture-matched photometry

ColorPro automatically obtains robust colors across images of varied PSF. To correct for the flux lost in images with poorer PSF, the "detection image" is blurred to match the PSF of these other images, allowing observation of how much flux is lost. All photometry is performed in the highest resolution frame (images being aligned given WCS information in the FITS headers), and identical apertures are used in every image. Usually isophotal apertures are used, as determined by SExtractor (ascl:1010.064). Using SExSeg (ascl:1508.006), object aperture definitions can be pre-defined and object detections from different image filters can be combined automatically into a single comprehensive "segmentation map." After producing the final photometric catalog, ColorPro can automatically run BPZ (ascl:1108.011) to obtain Bayesian Photometric Redshifts.

[ascl:1508.004] FRELLED: FITS Realtime Explorer of Low Latency in Every Dimension

FRELLED (FITS Realtime Explorer of Low Latency in Every Dimension) creates 3D images in real time from 3D FITS files and is written in Python for the 3D graphics suite Blender. Users can interactively generate masks around regions of arbitrary geometry and use them to catalog sources, hide regions, and perform basic analysis (e.g., image statistics within the selected region, generate contour plots, query NED and the SDSS). World coordinates are supported and multi-volume rendering is possible. FRELLED is designed for viewing HI data cubes and provides a number of tasks to commonly-used MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007) tasks (e.g. mbspect); however, many of its features are suitable for any type of data set. It also includes an n-body particle viewer with the ability to display 3D vector information as well as the ability to render time series movies of multiple FITS files and setup simple turntable rotation movies for single files.

[ascl:1508.003] REDUCEME: Long-slit spectroscopic data reduction and analysis

The astronomical data reduction package REDUCEME reduces and analyzes long-slit spectroscopic data. The package uses the unformatted FORTRAN raw data format, so requires FITS files be transformed to REDUCEME format; the reverse operation (from REDUCEME to FITS format) is also available. The package is a set of programs written in FORTRAN 77 and includes shell scripts (using the C shell syntax) to perform routine tasks; it can be extended by the inclusion of external programs. REDUCEME uses PGPLOT (ascl:1103.002) for line plots and images, and a subset of subroutines, called BUTTON, enables the user to communicate interactively with the image display employing graphic buttons. One advantage of using REDUCEM is that for each image an associated error image can also be processed throughout the reduction process, allowing for a careful control of the error propagation.

[ascl:1508.002] NICOLE: NLTE Stokes Synthesis/Inversion Code

NICOLE, written in Fortran 90, seeks the model atmosphere that provides the best fit to the Stokes profiles (in a least-squares sense) of an arbitrary number of simultaneously-observes spectral lines from solar/stellar atmospheres. The inversion core used for the development of NICOLE is the LORIEN engine (the Lovely Reusable Inversion ENgine), which combines the SVD technique with the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization method to solve the inverse problem.

[ascl:1508.001] HMcode: Halo-model matter power spectrum computation

HMcode computes the halo-model matter power spectrum. It is written in Fortran90 and has been designed to quickly (~0.5s for 200 k-values across 16 redshifts on a single core) produce matter spectra for a wide range of cosmological models. In testing it was shown to match spectra produced by the 'Coyote Emulator' to an accuracy of 5 per cent for k less than 10h Mpc^-1. However, it can also produce spectra well outside of the parameter space of the emulator.

[ascl:1507.020] IEHI: Ionization Equilibrium for Heavy Ions

IEHI, written in Fortran, outputs a simple "coronal" ionization equilibrium (i.e., collisional ionization and auto-ionization balanced by radiative and dielectronic recombination) for a plasma at a given electron temperature.

[ascl:1507.019] AstroStat: Statistical analysis tool

AstroStat performs statistical analysis on data and is compatible with Virtual Observatory (VO) standards. It accepts data in a variety of formats and performs various statistical tests using a menu driven interface. Analyses, performed in R, include exploratory tests, visualizations, distribution fitting, correlation and causation, hypothesis testing, multivariate analysis and clustering. AstroStat is available in two versions with an identical interface and features: as a web service that can be run using any standard browser and as an offline application.

[ascl:1507.018] pyro: Python-based tutorial for computational methods for hydrodynamics

pyro is a simple python-based tutorial on computational methods for hydrodynamics. It includes 2-d solvers for advection, compressible, incompressible, and low Mach number hydrodynamics, diffusion, and multigrid. It is written with ease of understanding in mind. An extensive set of notes that is part of the Open Astrophysics Bookshelf project provides details of the algorithms.

[ascl:1507.017] REDSPEC: NIRSPEC data reduction

REDSPEC is an IDL based reduction package designed with NIRSPEC in mind though can be used to reduce data from other spectrographs as well. REDSPEC accomplishes spatial rectification by summing an A+B pair of a calibration star to produce an image with two spectra; the image is remapped on the basis of polynomial fits to the spectral traces and calculation of gaussian centroids to define their separation, producing straight spectral traces with respect to the detector rows. The raw images are remapped onto a coordinate system with uniform intervals in spatial extent along the slit and in wavelength along the dispersion axis.

[ascl:1507.016] Least Asymmetry: Centering Method

Least Asymmetry finds the center of a distribution of light in an image using the least asymmetry method; the code also contains center of light and fitting a Gaussian routines. All functions in Least Asymmetry are designed to take optional weights.

[ascl:1507.015] DALI: Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods

DALI (Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods) is a fast approximation of non-Gaussian likelihoods. It extends the Fisher Matrix in a straightforward way and allows for a wider range of posterior shapes. The code is written in C/C++.

[ascl:1507.014] getsources: Multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction

getsources is a powerful multi-scale, multi-wavelength source extraction algorithm. It analyzes fine spatial decompositions of original images across a wide range of scales and across all wavebands, cleans those single-scale images of noise and background, and constructs wavelength-independent single-scale detection images that preserve information in both spatial and wavelength dimensions. getsources offers several advantages over other existing methods of source extraction, including the filtering out of irrelevant spatial scales to improve detectability, especially in the crowded regions and for extended sources, the ability to combine data over all wavebands, and the full automation of the extraction process.

[ascl:1507.013] K-Inpainting: Inpainting for Kepler

Inpainting is a technique for dealing with gaps in time series data, as frequently occurs in asteroseismology data, that may generate spurious peaks in the power spectrum, thus limiting the analysis of the data. The inpainting method, based on a sparsity prior, judiciously fills in gaps in the data, preserving the asteroseismic signal as far as possible. This method can be applied both on ground and space-based data. The inpainting technique improves the oscillation modes detection and estimation, the impact of the observational window function is reduced, and the interpretation of the power spectrum is simplified. K-Inpainting can be used to study very long time series of many stars because its computation is very fast.

[ascl:1507.012] DRAMA: Instrumentation software environment

DRAMA is a fast, distributed environment for writing instrumentation control systems. It allows low level instrumentation software to be controlled from user interfaces running on UNIX, MS Windows or VMS machines in a consistent manner. Such instrumentation tasks can run either on these machines or on real time systems such as VxWorks. DRAMA uses techniques developed by the AAO while using the Starlink-ADAM environment, but is optimized for the requirements of instrumentation control, portability, embedded systems and speed. A special program is provided which allows seamless communication between ADAM and DRAMA tasks.

[ascl:1507.011] FAT: Fully Automated TiRiFiC

FAT (Fully Automated TiRiFiC) is an automated procedure that fits tilted-ring models to Hi data cubes of individual, well-resolved galaxies. The method builds on the 3D Tilted Ring Fitting Code (TiRiFiC, ascl:1208.008). FAT accurately models the kinematics and the morphologies of galaxies with an extent of eight beams across the major axis in the inclination range 20°-90° without the need for priors such as disc inclination. FAT's performance allows us to model the gas kinematics of many thousands of well-resolved galaxies, which is essential for future HI surveys, with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

[ascl:1507.010] Astrochem: Abundances of chemical species in the interstellar medium

Astrochem computes the abundances of chemical species in the interstellar medium, as function of time. It studies the chemistry in a variety of astronomical objects, including diffuse clouds, dense clouds, photodissociation regions, prestellar cores, protostars, and protostellar disks. Astrochem reads a network of chemical reactions from a text file, builds up a system of kinetic rates equations, and solves it using a state-of-the-art stiff ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver. The Jacobian matrix of the system is computed implicitly, so the resolution of the system is extremely fast: large networks containing several thousands of reactions are usually solved in a few seconds. A variety of gas phase process are considered, as well as simple gas-grain interactions, such as the freeze-out and the desorption via several mechanisms (thermal desorption, cosmic-ray desorption and photo-desorption). The computed abundances are written in a HDF5 file, and can be plotted in different ways with the tools provided with Astrochem. Chemical reactions and their rates are written in a format which is meant to be easy to read and to edit. A tool to convert the chemical networks from the OSU and KIDA databases into this format is also provided. Astrochem is written in C, and its source code is distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL).

[ascl:1507.009] PPInteractions: Secondary particle spectra from proton-proton interactions

PPInteractions generates the secondary particle energy spectra produced in proton-proton interactions over the entire chosen energy range for any value of the primary proton spectral index by adjusting the low energy part of the spectra (below 0.1TeV) to the high energy end of the spectra (above 0.1TeV). This code is based on the parametrization of Kelner et al (2006), in which the normalization of the low energy part of the spectra is given only for 3 values of the primary proton spectral indices (2, 2.5, 3).

[ascl:1507.008] HLINOP: Hydrogen LINe OPacity in stellar atmospheres

HLINOP is a collection of codes for computing hydrogen line profiles and opacities in the conditions typical of stellar atmospheres. It includes HLINOP for approximate quick calculation of any line of neutral hydrogen (suitable for model atmosphere calculations), based on the Fortran code of Kurucz and Peterson found in ATLAS9. It also includes HLINPROF, for detailed, accurate calculation of lower Balmer line profiles (suitable for detailed analysis of Balmer lines) and HBOP, to implement the occupation probability formalism of Daeppen, Anderson and Milhalas (1987) and thus account for the merging of bound-bound and bound-free opacity (used often as a wrapper to HLINOP for model atmosphere calculations).

[ascl:1507.007] abo-cross: Hydrogen broadening cross-section calculator

Line broadening cross sections for the broadening of spectral lines by collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms have been tabulated by Anstee & O’Mara (1995), Barklem & O’Mara (1997) and Barklem, O’Mara & Ross (1998) for s–p, p–s, p–d, d–p, d–f and f–d transitions. abo-cross, written in Fortran, interpolates in these tabulations to make these data more accessible to the end user. This code can be incorporated into existing spectrum synthesis programs or used it in a stand-alone mode to compute line broadening cross sections for specific transitions.

[ascl:1507.006] Toyz: Large datasets and astronomical images analysis framework

Toyz is a python web framework that allows scientists to interact with large images and data sets stored on a remote server. A web application is run on the server containing the data and clients are run from web browsers on the user's computer. Toyz displays large FITS images also also renders any image format supported by Pillow (a fork of the Python Imaging Library), contains a GUI to interact with linked plots, and offers a customizable framework that allows students and researchers to create their own work spaces inside a Toyz environment. Astro-Toyz extends the features of the Toyz image viewer, allowing users to view world coordinates and align images based on their WCS.

[ascl:1507.005] slimplectic: Discrete non-conservative numerical integrator

slimplectic is a python implementation of a numerical integrator that uses a fixed time-step variational integrator formalism applied to the principle of stationary nonconservative action. It allows nonconservative effects to be included in the numerical evolution while preserving the major benefits of normally conservative symplectic integrators, particularly the accurate long-term evolution of momenta and energy. slimplectic is appropriate for exploring cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g. dynamical friction or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

[ascl:1507.004] L-PICOLA: Fast dark matter simulation code

L-PICOLA generates and evolves a set of initial conditions into a dark matter field and can include primordial non-Gaussianity in the simulation and simulate the past lightcone at run-time, with optional replication of the simulation volume. It is a fast, distributed-memory, planar-parallel code. L-PICOLA is extremely useful for both current and next generation large-scale structure surveys.

[ascl:1507.003] Pelican: Pipeline for Extensible, Lightweight Imaging and CAlibratioN

Pelican is an efficient, lightweight C++ library for quasi-real time data processing. The library provides a framework to separate the acquisition and processing of data, allowing the scalability and flexibility to fit a number of scenarios. Though its origin was in radio astronomy, processing data as it arrives from a telescope, the framework is sufficiently generic to be useful to any application that requires the efficient processing of incoming data streams.

[ascl:1507.002] SUPERBOX: Particle-multi-mesh code to simulate galaxies

SUPERBOX is a particle-mesh code that uses moving sub-grids to track and resolve high-density peaks in the particle distribution and a nearest grid point force-calculation scheme based on the second derivatives of the potential. The code implements a fast low-storage FFT-algorithm and allows a highly resolved treatment of interactions in clusters of galaxies, such as high-velocity encounters between elliptical galaxies and the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies, as sub-grids follow the trajectories of individual galaxies. SUPERBOX is efficient in that the computational overhead is kept as slim as possible and is also memory efficient since it uses only one set of grids to treat galaxies in succession.

[ascl:1507.001] 3D-Barolo: 3D fitting tool for the kinematics of galaxies

3D-Barolo (3D-Based Analysis of Rotating Object via Line Observations) or BBarolo is a tool for fitting 3D tilted-ring models to emission-line datacubes. BBarolo works with 3D FITS files, i.e. image arrays with two spatial and one spectral dimensions. BBarolo recovers the true rotation curve and estimates the intrinsic velocity dispersion even in barely resolved galaxies (about 2 resolution elements) if the signal to noise of the data is larger than 2-3. It has source-detection and first-estimate modules, making it suitable for analyzing large 3D datasets automatically, and is a useful tool for deriving reliable kinematics for both local and high-redshift galaxies.

[ascl:1506.010] VAPID: Voigt Absorption-Profile [Interstellar] Dabbler

VAPID (Voigt Absorption Profile [Interstellar] Dabbler) models interstellar absorption lines. It predicts profiles and optimizes model parameters by least-squares fitting to observed spectra. VAPID allows cloud parameters to be optimized with respect to several different data set simultaneously; those data sets may include observations of different transitions of a given species, and may have different S/N ratios and resolutions.

[ascl:1506.009] HEATCVB: Coronal heating rate approximations

HEATCVB is a stand-alone Fortran 77 subroutine that estimates the local volumetric coronal heating rate with four required inputs: the radial distance r, the wind speed u, the mass density ρ, and the magnetic field strength |B0|. The primary output is the heating rate Qturb at the location defined by the input parameters. HEATCVB also computes the local turbulent dissipation rate of the waves, γ = Qturb/(2UA).

[ascl:1506.008] SPRITE: Sparsity-based super-resolution algorithm

SPRITE (Sparse Recovery of InstrumenTal rEsponse) computes a well-resolved compact source image from several undersampled and noisy observations. The algorithm is based on sparse regularization; adding a sparse penalty in the recovery leads to far better accuracy in terms of ellipticity error, especially at low S/N.

[ascl:1506.007] REALMAF: Magnetic power spectra from Faraday rotation maps

REALMAF is a maximum-a-posteriori code to measure magnetic power spectra from Faraday rotation data. It uses a sophisticated model for the magnetic autocorrelation in real space, thus alleviating the need for simplifying assumptions in the processing. REALMAF treats the divergence relation of the magnetic field with a multiplicative factor in Fourier space, which allows modeling the magnetic autocorrelation as a spherically symmetric function.

[ascl:1506.006] fsclean: Faraday Synthesis CLEAN imager

Fsclean produces 3D Faraday spectra using the Faraday synthesis method, transforming directly from multi-frequency visibility data to the Faraday depth-sky plane space. Deconvolution is accomplished using the CLEAN algorithm, and the package includes Clark and Högbom style CLEAN algorithms. Fsclean reads in MeasurementSet visibility data and produces HDF5 formatted images; it handles images and data of arbitrary size, using scratch HDF5 files as buffers for data that is not being immediately processed, and is limited only by available disk space.

[ascl:1506.005] PyMC: Bayesian Stochastic Modelling in Python

PyMC is a python module that implements Bayesian statistical models and fitting algorithms, including Markov chain Monte Carlo. Its flexibility and extensibility make it applicable to a large suite of problems. Along with core sampling functionality, PyMC includes methods for summarizing output, plotting, goodness-of-fit and convergence diagnostics.

[ascl:1506.004] multiband_LS: Multiband Lomb-Scargle Periodograms

The multiband periodogram is a general extension of the well-known Lomb-Scargle approach for detecting periodic signals in time-domain data. In addition to advantages of the Lomb-Scargle method such as treatment of non-uniform sampling and heteroscedastic errors, the multiband periodogram significantly improves period finding for randomly sampled multiband light curves (e.g., Pan-STARRS, DES and LSST). The light curves in each band are modeled as arbitrary truncated Fourier series, with the period and phase shared across all bands.

[ascl:1506.003] PLATO Simulator: Realistic simulations of expected observations

PLATO Simulator is an end-to-end simulation software tool designed for the performance of realistic simulations of the expected observations of the PLATO mission but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. It models and simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all important natural noise sources.

[submitted] RODRIGUES (RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software)

RODRIGUES stands for RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software. It is a web based radio telescope simulation and reduction tool. From a technical perspective it is a web based parameterised docker container scheduler with a result set viewer.

[ascl:1506.002] dmdd: Dark matter direct detection

The dmdd package enables simple simulation and Bayesian posterior analysis of recoil-event data from dark-matter direct-detection experiments under a wide variety of scattering theories. It enables calculation of the nuclear-recoil rates for a wide range of non-relativistic and relativistic scattering operators, including non-standard momentum-, velocity-, and spin-dependent rates. It also accounts for the correct nuclear response functions for each scattering operator and takes into account the natural abundances of isotopes for a variety of experimental target elements.

[ascl:1506.001] pyKLIP: PSF Subtraction for Exoplanets and Disks

pyKLIP subtracts out the stellar PSF to search for directly-imaged exoplanets and disks using a Python implementation of the Karhunen-Loève Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm. pyKLIP supports ADI, SDI, and ADI+SDI to model the stellar PSF and offers a large array of PSF subtraction parameters to optimize the reduction. pyKLIP relies on a minimal amount of dependencies (numpy, scipy, and astropy) and parallelizes the KLIP algorithm to speed up the reduction. pyKLIP supports GPI and P1640 data and can interface with other data sources with the addition of new modules. It also can inject simulated planets and disks as well as automatically search for point sources in PSF-subtracted data.

[ascl:1505.034] dStar: Neutron star thermal evolution code

dStar is a collection of modules for computing neutron star structure and evolution, and uses the numerical, utility, and equation of state libraries of MESA (ascl:1010.083).

[ascl:1505.033] SNEC: SuperNova Explosion Code

SNEC (SuperNova Explosion Code) is a spherically-symmetric Lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics code that follows supernova explosions through the envelope of their progenitor star, produces bolometric (and approximate multi-color) light curve predictions, and provides input to spectral synthesis codes for spectral modeling. SNEC's features include 1D (spherical) Lagrangian Newtonian hydrodynamics with artificial viscosity, stellar equation of state with a Saha solver ionization/recombination, equilibrium flux-limited photon diffusion with OPAL opacities and low-temperature opacities, and prediction of bolometric light curves and multi-color lightcurves (in the blackbody approximation).

[ascl:1505.032] Planck Level-S: Planck Simulation Package

The Planck simulation package takes a cosmological model specified by the user and calculates a potential CMB sky consistent with this model, including astrophysical foregrounds, and then performs a simulated observation of this sky. This Simulation embraces many instrumental effects such as beam convolution and noise. Alternatively, the package can simulate the observation of a provided sky model, generated by another program such as the Planck Sky Model software. The Planck simulation package does not only provide Planck-like data, it can also be easily adopted to mimic the properties of other existing and upcoming CMB experiments.

[ascl:1505.031] TEA: Thermal Equilibrium Abundances

TEA (Thermal Equilibrium Abundances) calculates gaseous molecular abundances under thermochemical equilibrium conditions. Given a single T,P point or a list of T,P pairs (the thermal profile of an atmosphere) and elemental abundances, TEA calculates mole fractions of the desired molecular species. TEA uses 84 elemental species and thermodynamical data for more then 600 gaseous molecular species, and can adopt any initial elemental abundances.

[ascl:1505.030] CANDID: Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data

CANDID finds faint companion around star in interferometric data in the OIFITS format. It allows systematically searching for faint companions in OIFITS data, and if not found, estimates the detection limit. The tool is based on model fitting and Chi2 minimization, with a grid for the starting points of the companion position. It ensures all positions are explored by estimating a-posteriori if the grid is dense enough, and provides an estimate of the optimum grid density.

[ascl:1505.029] fits2hdf: FITS to HDFITS conversion

fits2hdf ports FITS files to Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files in the HDFITS format. HDFITS allows faster reading of data, higher compression ratios, and higher throughput. HDFITS formatted data can be presented transparently as an in-memory FITS equivalent by changing the import lines in Python-based FITS utilities. fits2hdf includes a utility to port MeasurementSets (MS) to HDF5 files.

[ascl:1505.028] RESOLVE: Bayesian algorithm for aperture synthesis imaging in radio astronomy

RESOLVE is a Bayesian inference algorithm for image reconstruction in radio interferometry. It is optimized for extended and diffuse sources. Features include parameter-free Bayesian reconstruction of radio continuum data with a focus on extended and weak diffuse sources, reconstruction with uncertainty propagation dependent on measurement noise, and estimation of the spatial correlation structure of the radio astronomical source. RESOLVE provides full support for measurement sets and includes a simulation tool (if uv-coverage is provided).

[ascl:1505.027] BAYES-X: Bayesian inference tool for the analysis of X-ray observations of galaxy clusters

The great majority of X-ray measurements of cluster masses in the literature assume parametrized functional forms for the radial distribution of two independent cluster thermodynamic properties, such as electron density and temperature, to model the X-ray surface brightness. These radial profiles (e.g. β-model) have an amplitude normalization parameter and two or more shape parameters. BAYES-X uses a cluster model to parametrize the radial X-ray surface brightness profile and explore the constraints on both model parameters and physical parameters. Bayes-X is programmed in Fortran and uses MultiNest (ascl:1109.006) as the Bayesian inference engine.

[ascl:1505.026] Lensed: Forward parametric modelling of strong lenses

Lensed performs forward parametric modelling of strong lenses. Using a provided model, Lensed renders the expected image of the lensing event for a large number of parameter settings, thereby exploring the space of possible realizations of the observation. It compares the expectation to the observed image by calculating the likelihood that the observation was indeed produced by the assumed model, thus reconstructing the probability distribution over the parameter space of the model. Written in C, the code uses a massively parallel ray-tracing kernel to perform the necessary calculations on a graphics processing unit (GPU), making the precise rendering of the background lensed sources fast and allowing the simultaneous optimization of tens of parameters for the selected model.

[ascl:1505.025] pyMCZ: Oxygen abundances calculations and uncertainties from strong-line flux measurements

pyMCZ calculates metallicity according to a number of strong line metallicity diagnostics from spectroscopy line measurements and obtain uncertainties from the line flux errors in a Monte Carlo framework. Given line flux measurements and their uncertainties, pyMCZ produces synthetic distributions for the oxygen abundance in up to 13 metallicity scales simultaneously, as well as for E(B-V), and estimates their median values and their 66% confidence regions. The code can output the full MC distributions and their kernel density estimates.

[ascl:1505.024] PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

[ascl:1505.023] SNooPy: TypeIa supernovae analysis tools

The SNooPy package (also known as SNpy), written in Python, contains tools for the analysis of TypeIa supernovae. It offers interactive plotting of light-curve data and models (and spectra), computation of reddening laws and K-corrections, LM non-linear least-squares fitting of light-curve data, and various types of spline fitting, including Diercx and tension. The package also includes a SNIa lightcurve template generator in the CSP passbands, estimates of Milky-Way Extinction, and a module for dealing with filters and spectra.

[ascl:1505.022] Snoopy: General purpose spectral solver

Snoopy is a spectral 3D code that solves the MHD and Boussinesq equations, such as compressibility, particles, and Braginskii viscosity, and several other physical effects. It's useful for turbulence study involving shear and rotation. Snoopy requires the FFTW library (ascl:1201.015), and can run on parallel machine using MPI OpenMP or both at the same time.

[ascl:1505.021] relline: Relativistic line profiles calculation

relline calculates relativistic line profiles; it is compatible with the common X-ray data analysis software XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) and ISIS (ascl:1302.002). The two basic forms are an additive line model (RELLINE) and a convolution model to calculate relativistic smearing (RELCONV).

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