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[ascl:1203.006] EMACSS: Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS

The star cluster evolution code Evolve Me A Cluster of StarS (EMACSS) is a simple yet physically motivated computational model that describes the evolution of some fundamental properties of star clusters in static tidal fields. The prescription is based upon the flow of energy within the cluster, which is a constant fraction of the total energy per half-mass relaxation time. According to Henon's predictions, this flow is independent of the precise mechanisms for energy production within the core, and therefore does not require a complete description of the many-body interactions therein. Dynamical theory and analytic descriptions of escape mechanisms is used to construct a series of coupled differential equations expressing the time evolution of cluster mass and radius for a cluster of equal-mass stars. These equations are numerically solved using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration kernel; the results were benchmarked against a data base of direct N-body simulations. EMACSS is publicly available and reproduces the N-body results to within ~10 per cent accuracy for the entire post-collapse evolution of star clusters.

[ascl:1303.002] emcee: The MCMC Hammer

emcee is an extensible, pure-Python implementation of Goodman & Weare's Affine Invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Ensemble sampler. It's designed for Bayesian parameter estimation. The algorithm behind emcee has several advantages over traditional MCMC sampling methods and has excellent performance as measured by the autocorrelation time (or function calls per independent sample). One advantage of the algorithm is that it requires hand-tuning of only 1 or 2 parameters compared to $sim N^2$ for a traditional algorithm in an N-dimensional parameter space. Exploiting the parallelism of the ensemble method, emcee permits any user to take advantage of multiple CPU cores without extra effort.

[ascl:1201.004] emGain: Determination of EM gain of CCD

The determination of the EM gain of the CCD is best done by fitting the histogram of many low-light frames. Typically, the dark+CIC noise of a 30ms frame itself is a sufficient amount of signal to determine accurately the EM gain with about 200 512x512 frames. The IDL code emGain takes as an input a cube of frames and fit the histogram of all the pixels with the EM stage output probability function. The function returns the EM gain of the frames as well as the read-out noise and the mean signal level of the frames.

[ascl:1708.027] empiriciSN: Supernova parameter generator

empiriciSN generates realistic supernova parameters given photometric observations of a potential host galaxy, based entirely on empirical correlations measured from supernova datasets. It is intended to be used to improve supernova simulation for DES and LSST. It is extendable such that additional datasets may be added in the future to improve the fitting algorithm or so that additional light curve parameters or supernova types may be fit.

[ascl:1010.018] Emu CMB: Power spectrum emulator

Emu CMB is a fast emulator the CMB temperature power spectrum based on CAMB (Jan 2010 version). Emu CMB is based on a "space-filling" Orthogonal Array Latin Hypercube design in a de-correlated parameter space obtained by using a fiducial WMAP5 CMB Fisher matrix as a rotation matrix. This design strategy allows for accurate interpolation with small numbers of simulation design points. The emulator presented here is calibrated with 100 CAMB runs that are interpolated over the design space using a global quadratic polynomial fit.

[ascl:1109.012] EnBiD: Fast Multi-dimensional Density Estimation

We present a method to numerically estimate the densities of a discretely sampled data based on a binary space partitioning tree. We start with a root node containing all the particles and then recursively divide each node into two nodes each containing roughly equal number of particles, until each of the nodes contains only one particle. The volume of such a leaf node provides an estimate of the local density and its shape provides an estimate of the variance. We implement an entropy-based node splitting criterion that results in a significant improvement in the estimation of densities compared to earlier work. The method is completely metric free and can be applied to arbitrary number of dimensions. We use this method to determine the appropriate metric at each point in space and then use kernel-based methods for calculating the density. The kernel-smoothed estimates were found to be more accurate and have lower dispersion. We apply this method to determine the phase-space densities of dark matter haloes obtained from cosmological N-body simulations. We find that contrary to earlier studies, the volume distribution function v(f) of phase-space density f does not have a constant slope but rather a small hump at high phase-space densities. We demonstrate that a model in which a halo is made up by a superposition of Hernquist spheres is not capable in explaining the shape of v(f) versus f relation, whereas a model which takes into account the contribution of the main halo separately roughly reproduces the behaviour as seen in simulations. The use of the presented method is not limited to calculation of phase-space densities, but can be used as a general purpose data-mining tool and due to its speed and accuracy it is ideally suited for analysis of large multidimensional data sets.

[ascl:1706.007] encube: Large-scale comparative visualization and analysis of sets of multidimensional data

Encube is a qualitative, quantitative and comparative visualization and analysis framework, with application to high-resolution, immersive three-dimensional environments and desktop displays, providing a capable visual analytics experience across the display ecology. Encube includes mechanisms for the support of: 1) interactive visual analytics of sufficiently large subsets of data; 2) synchronous and asynchronous collaboration; and 3) documentation of the discovery workflow. The framework is modular, allowing additional functionalities to be included as required.

[ascl:1501.008] Enrico: Python package to simplify Fermi-LAT analysis

Enrico analyzes Fermi data. It produces spectra (model fit and flux points), maps and lightcurves for a target by editing a config file and running a python script which executes the Fermi science tool chain.

[ascl:1010.072] Enzo: AMR Cosmology Application

Enzo is an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), grid-based hybrid code (hydro + N-Body) which is designed to do simulations of cosmological structure formation. It uses the algorithms of Berger & Collela to improve spatial and temporal resolution in regions of large gradients, such as gravitationally collapsing objects. The Enzo simulation software is incredibly flexible, and can be used to simulate a wide range of cosmological situations with the available physics packages.

Enzo has been parallelized using the MPI message-passing library and can run on any shared or distributed memory parallel supercomputer or PC cluster. Simulations using as many as 1024 processors have been successfully carried out on the San Diego Supercomputing Center's Blue Horizon, an IBM SP.

[ascl:1511.021] EPIC: E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator

E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (EPIC), a highly parallelized Object Oriented Python package, implements the Modular Optimal Frequency Fourier (MOFF) imaging technique. It also includes visibility-based imaging using the software holography technique and a simulator for generating electric fields from a sky model. EPIC can accept dual-polarization inputs and produce images of all four instrumental cross-polarizations.

[ascl:1302.005] EPICS: Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System

EPICS is a set of software tools and applications developed collaboratively and used to create distributed soft real-time control systems for scientific instruments such as particle accelerators and telescopes. Such distributed control systems typically comprise tens or even hundreds of computers, networked together to allow communication between them and to provide control and feedback of the various parts of the device from a central control room, or even remotely over the internet. EPICS uses Client/Server and Publish/Subscribe techniques to communicate between the various computers. A Channel Access Gateway allows engineers and physicists elsewhere in the building to examine the current state of the IOCs, but prevents them from making unauthorized adjustments to the running system. In many cases the engineers can make a secure internet connection from home to diagnose and fix faults without having to travel to the site.

EPICS is used by many facilities worldwide, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, Fermilab, Keck Observatory, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Australian Synchrotron, and Stanford Linear Accellerator Center.

[ascl:1204.017] epsnoise: Pixel noise in ellipticity and shear measurements

epsnoise simulates pixel noise in weak-lensing ellipticity and shear measurements. This open-source python code can efficiently create an intrinsic ellipticity distribution, shear it, and add noise, thereby mimicking a "perfect" measurement that is not affected by shape-measurement biases. For theoretical studies, we provide the Marsaglia distribution, which describes the ratio of normal variables in the general case of non-zero mean and correlation. We also added a convenience method that evaluates the Marsaglia distribution for the ratio of moments of a Gaussian-shaped brightness distribution, which gives a very good approximation of the measured ellipticity distribution also for galaxies with different radial profiles. We provide four shear estimators, two based on the ε ellipticity measure, two on χ. While three of them are essentially plain averages, we introduce a new estimator which requires a functional minimization.

[ascl:1603.005] EQUIB: Atomic level populations and line emissivities calculator

The Fortran program EQUIB solves the statistical equilibrium equation for each ion and yields atomic level populations and line emissivities for given physical conditions, namely electron temperature and electron density, appropriate to the zones in an ionized nebula where the ions are expected to exist.

[ascl:1302.017] ESO-MIDAS: General tools for image processing and data reduction

The ESO-MIDAS system provides general tools for image processing and data reduction with emphasis on astronomical applications including imaging and special reduction packages for ESO instrumentation at La Silla and the VLT at Paranal. In addition it contains applications packages for stellar and surface photometry, image sharpening and decomposition, statistics, data fitting, data presentation in graphical form, and more.

[ascl:1504.003] EsoRex: ESO Recipe Execution Tool

EsoRex (ESO Recipe Execution Tool) lists, configures, and executes Common Pipeline Library (CPL) (ascl:1402.010) recipes from the command line. Its features include automatically generating configuration files, recursive recipe-path searching, command line and configuration file parameters, and recipe product naming control, among many others.

[ascl:1405.017] ESP: Extended Surface Photometry

ESP (Extended Surface Photometry) determines the photometric properties of galaxies and other extended objects. It has applications that detect flatfielding faults, remove cosmic rays, median filter images, determine image statistics and local background values, perform galaxy profiling, fit 2-D Gaussian profiles to galaxies, generate pie slice cross-sections of galaxies, and display profiling results. It is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1305.001] ESTER: Evolution STEllaire en Rotation

The ESTER code computes the steady state of an isolated star of mass larger than two solar masses. The only convective region computed as such is the core where isentropy is assumed. ESTER provides solutions of the partial differential equations, for the pressure, density, temperature, angular velocity and meridional velocity for the whole volume. The angular velocity (differential rotation) and meridional circulation are computed consistently with the structure and are driven by the baroclinic torque. The code uses spectral methods, both radially and horizontally, with spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials. The iterations follow Newton's algorithm. The code is object-oriented and is written in C++; a python suite allows an easy visualization of the results. While running, PGPLOT graphs are displayed to show evolution of the iterations.

[ascl:1311.012] ETC: Exposure Time Calculator

Written for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) high-latitude survey, the exposure time calculator (ETC) works in both imaging and spectroscopic modes. In addition to the standard ETC functions (e.g. background and S/N determination), the calculator integrates over the galaxy population and forecasts the density and redshift distribution of galaxy shapes usable for weak lensing (in imaging mode) and the detected emission lines (in spectroscopic mode). The program may be useful outside of WFIRST but no warranties are made regarding its suitability for general purposes. The software is available for download; IPAC maintains a web interface for those who wish to run a small number of cases without having to download the package.

[ascl:1307.018] ETC++: Advanced Exposure-Time Calculations

ETC++ is a exposure-time calculator that considers the effect of cosmic rays, undersampling, dithering, and imperfect pixel response functions. Errors on astrometry and galaxy shape measurements can be predicted as well as photometric errors.

[ascl:1204.011] EXCOP: EXtraction of COsmological Parameters

The EXtraction of COsmological Parameters software (EXCOP) is a set of C and IDL programs together with a very large database of cosmological models generated by CMBFAST that will compute likelihood functions for cosmological parameters given some CMB data. This is the software and database used in the Stompor et al. (2001) analysis of a high resoultion Maxima1 CMB anisotropy map.

[ascl:1611.005] Exo-Transmit: Radiative transfer code for calculating exoplanet transmission spectra

Exo-Transmit calculates the transmission spectrum of an exoplanet atmosphere given specified input information about the planetary and stellar radii, the planet's surface gravity, the atmospheric temperature-pressure (T-P) profile, the location (in terms of pressure) of any cloud layers, the composition of the atmosphere, and opacity data for the atoms and molecules that make up the atmosphere. The code solves the equation of radiative transfer for absorption of starlight passing through the planet's atmosphere as it transits, accounting for the oblique path of light through the planetary atmosphere along an Earth-bound observer's line of sight. The fraction of light absorbed (or blocked) by the planet plus its atmosphere is calculated as a function of wavelength to produce the wavelength-dependent transmission spectrum. Functionality is provided to simulate the presence of atmospheric aerosols in two ways: an optically thick (gray) cloud deck can be generated at a user-specified height in the atmosphere, and the nominal Rayleigh scattering can be increased by a specified factor.

[ascl:1512.011] ExoData: Open Exoplanet Catalogue exploration and analysis tool

ExoData is a python interface for accessing and exploring the Open Exoplanet Catalogue. It allows searching of planets (including alternate names) and easy navigation of hierarchy, parses spectral types and fills in missing parameters based on programmable specifications, and provides easy reference of planet parameters such as GJ1214b.ra, GJ1214b.T, and GJ1214b.R. It calculates values such as transit duration, can easily rescale units, and can be used as an input catalog for large scale simulation and analysis of planets.

[ascl:1207.001] EXOFAST: Fast transit and/or RV fitter for single exoplanet

We present EXOFAST, a fast, robust suite of routines written in IDL which is designed to fit exoplanetary transits and radial velocity variations simultaneously or separately, and characterize the parameter uncertainties and covariances with a Differential Evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Our code self-consistently incorporates both data sets to simultaneously derive stellar parameters along with the transit and RV parameters, resulting in consistent, but tighter constraints on an example fit of the discovery data of HAT-P-3b that is well-mixed in under two minutes on a standard desktop computer. EXOFAST has an easy-to-use online interface for several basic features of our transit and radial velocity fitting.

[submitted] EXOFASTv2: A public, generalized, publication-quality exoplanet modeling code

EXOFASTv2 is the next generation of exoplanet modeling software, using a differential evolution markov chain monte carlo code to fit an arbitrary number of transits (each with their own error scaling, normalization, TTV, and/or detrending parameters), an arbitrary number of RV sources (each with their own zero point and jitter), and an arbitrary number of planets, changing nothing but command line arguments and configuration files. The global model includes integrated isochrone and SED models to constrain the stellar properties and can accept priors on any fitted or derived quantities (e.g., parallax from Gaia). It is easily extensible to add additional effects or parameters.

[ascl:1201.009] ExoFit: Orbital parameters of extra-solar planets from radial velocity

ExoFit is a freely available software package for estimating orbital parameters of extra-solar planets. ExoFit can search for either one or two planets and employs a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to fit a Keplerian radial velocity curve onto the radial velocity data.

[submitted] ExoPlanet

ExoPlanet provides a graphical interface for the construction, evaluation and application of a machine learning model in predictive analysis. With the back-end built using the numpy and scikit-learn libraries, ExoPlanet couples fast and well tested algorithms, a UI designed over the PyQt framework, and graphs rendered using Matplotlib. This serves to provide the user with a rich interface, rapid analytics and interactive visuals.

ExoPlanet is designed to have a minimal learning curve to allow researchers to focus more on the applicative aspect of machine learning algorithms rather than their implementation details and supports both methods of learning, providing algorithms for unsupervised and supervised training, which may be done with continuous or discrete labels. The parameters of each algorithms can be adjusted to ensure the best fit for the data. Training data is read from a CSV file, and after training is complete, ExoPlanet automates the building of the visual representations for the trained model. Once training and evaluation yield satisfactory results, the model may be used to make data based predictions on a new data set.

[ascl:1501.015] Exoplanet: Trans-dimensional MCMC method for exoplanet discovery

Exoplanet determines the posterior distribution of exoplanets by use of a trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method within Nested Sampling. This method finds the posterior distribution in a single run rather than requiring multiple runs with trial values.

[ascl:1407.008] Exopop: Exoplanet population inference

Exopop is a general hierarchical probabilistic framework for making justified inferences about the population of exoplanets. Written in python, it requires that the occurrence rate density be a smooth function of period and radius (employing a Gaussian process) and takes survey completeness and observational uncertainties into account. Exopop produces more accurate estimates of the whole population than standard procedures based on weighting by inverse detection efficiency.

[ascl:1603.010] ExoPriors: Accounting for observational bias of transiting exoplanets

ExoPriors calculates a log-likelihood penalty for an input set of transit parameters to account for observational bias (geometric and signal-to-noise ratio detection bias) of transiting exoplanets. Written in Python, the code calculates this log-likelihood penalty in one of seven user-specified cases specified with Boolean input parameters for geometric and/or SNR bias, grazing or non-grazing events, and occultation events.

[ascl:1501.012] Exorings: Exoring modelling software

Exorings, written in Python, contains tools for displaying and fitting giant extrasolar planet ring systems; it uses FITS formatted data for input.

[ascl:1703.008] exorings: Exoring Transit Properties

Exorings is suitable for surveying entire catalogs of transiting planet candidates for exoring candidates, providing a subset of objects worthy of more detailed light curve analysis. Moreover, it is highly suited for uncovering evidence of a population of ringed planets by comparing the radius anomaly and PR-effects in ensemble studies.

[ascl:1706.010] EXOSIMS: Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator

EXOSIMS generates and analyzes end-to-end simulations of space-based exoplanet imaging missions. The software is built up of interconnecting modules describing different aspects of the mission, including the observatory, optical system, and scheduler (encoding mission rules) as well as the physical universe, including the assumed distribution of exoplanets and their physical and orbital properties. Each module has a prototype implementation that is inherited by specific implementations for different missions concepts, allowing for the simulation of widely variable missions.

[ascl:1708.023] ExoSOFT: Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox

ExoSOFT provides orbital analysis of exoplanets and binary star systems. It fits any combination of astrometric and radial velocity data, and offers four parameter space exploration techniques, including MCMC. It is packaged with an automated set of post-processing and plotting routines to summarize results, and is suitable for performing orbital analysis during surveys with new radial velocity and direct imaging instruments.

[ascl:1706.001] Exotrending: Fast and easy-to-use light curve detrending software for exoplanets

The simple, straightforward Exotrending code detrends exoplanet transit light curves given a light curve (flux versus time) and good ephemeris (epoch of first transit and orbital period). The code has been tested with Kepler and K2 light curves and should work with any other light curve.

[ascl:1212.013] EXSdetect: Extended X-ray Source Detection

EXSdetect is a python implementation of an X-ray source detection algorithm which is optimally designed to detected faint extended sources and makes use of Voronoi tessellation and Friend-of-Friend technique. It is a flexible tool capable of detecting extended sources down to the lowest flux levels attainable within instrumental limitations while maintaining robust photometry, high completeness, and low contamination, regardless of source morphology. EXSdetect was developed mainly to exploit the ever-increasing wealth of archival X-ray data, but is also ideally suited to explore the scientific capabilities of future X-ray facilities, with a strong focus on investigations of distant groups and clusters of galaxies.

[ascl:9906.002] EXTINCT: A computerized model of large-scale visual interstellar extinction

The program EXTINCT.FOR is a FORTRAN subroutine summarizing a three-dimensional visual Galactic extinction model, based on a number of published studies. INPUTS: Galactic latitude (degrees), Galactic longitude (degrees), and source distance (kpc). OUTPUTS (magnitudes): Extinction, extinction error, a statistical correction term, and an array containing extinction and extinction error from each subroutine. The model is useful for correcting visual magnitudes of Galactic sources (particularly in statistical models), and has been used to find Galactic extinction of extragalactic sources. The model's limited angular resolution (subroutine-dependent, but with a minimum resolution of roughly 2 degrees) is necessitated by its ability to describe three-dimensional structure.

[ascl:1708.025] extinction-distances: Estimating distances to dark clouds

Extinction-distances uses the number of foreground stars and a Galactic model of the stellar distribution to estimate the distance to dark clouds. It exploits the relatively narrow range of intrinsic near-infrared colors of stars to separate foreground from background stars. An advantage of this method is that the distribution of stellar colors in the Galactic model need not be precisely correct, only the number density as a function of distance from the Sun.

[ascl:1010.032] Extreme Deconvolution: Density Estimation using Gaussian Mixtures in the Presence of Noisy, Heterogeneous and Incomplete Data

Extreme-deconvolution is a general algorithm to infer a d-dimensional distribution function from a set of heterogeneous, noisy observations or samples. It is fast, flexible, and treats the data's individual uncertainties properly, to get the best description possible for the underlying distribution. It performs well over the full range of density estimation, from small data sets with only tens of samples per dimension, to large data sets with hundreds of thousands of data points.

[ascl:1010.061] EyE: Enhance Your Extraction

In EyE (Enhance Your Extraction) an artificial neural network connected to pixels of a moving window (retina) is trained to associate these input stimuli to the corresponding response in one or several output image(s). The resulting filter can be loaded in SExtractor to operate complex, wildly non-linear filters on astronomical images. Typical applications of EyE include adaptive filtering, feature detection and cosmetic corrections.

[ascl:1407.019] EZ_Ages: Stellar population age calculator

EZ_Ages is an IDL code package that computes the mean, light-weighted stellar population age, [Fe/H], and abundance enhancements [Mg/Fe], [C/Fe], [N/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] for unresolved stellar populations. This is accomplished by comparing Lick index line strengths between the data and the stellar population models of Schiavon (2007), using a method described in Graves & Schiavon (2008). The algorithm uses the inversion of index-index model grids to determine ages and abundances, and exploits the sensitivities of the various Lick indices to measure Mg, C, N, and Ca enhancements over their solar abundances with respect to Fe.

[ascl:1210.004] EZ: A Tool For Automatic Redshift Measurement

EZ (Easy-Z) estimates redshifts for extragalactic objects. It compares the observed spectrum with a set of (user given) spectral templates to find out the best value for the redshift. To accomplish this task, it uses a highly configurable set of algorithms. EZ is easily extendible with new algorithms. It is implemented as a set of C programs and a number of python classes. It can be used as a standalone program, or the python classes can be directly imported by other applications.

[ascl:1208.021] EzGal: A Flexible Interface for Stellar Population Synthesis Models

EzGal is a flexible Python program which generates observable parameters (magnitudes, colors, and mass-to-light ratios) for arbitrary input stellar population synthesis (SPS) models; it enables simple, direct comparison of different model sets so that the uncertainty introduced by choice of model set can be quantified. EzGal is also capable of generating composite stellar population models (CSPs) for arbitrary input star-formation histories and reddening laws, and can be used to interpolate between metallicities for a given model set.

[ascl:1705.006] f3: Full Frame Fotometry for Kepler Full Frame Images

Light curves from the Kepler telescope rely on "postage stamp" cutouts of a few pixels near each of 200,000 target stars. These light curves are optimized for the detection of short-term signals like planet transits but induce systematics that overwhelm long-term variations in stellar flux. Longer-term effects can be recovered through analysis of the Full Frame Images, a set of calibration data obtained monthly during the Kepler mission. The Python package f3 analyzes the Full Frame Images to infer long-term astrophysical variations in the brightness of Kepler targets, such as magnetic activity or sunspots on slowly rotating stars.

[submitted] Fake Spectra Flux Extractor

The fake spectra flux extractor generates simulated quasar absorption spectra from a particle or adaptive mesh-based hydrodynamic simulation. It is implemented as a python module.

It can produce both hydrogen and metal line spectra, if the simulation includes metals. The cloudy table for metal ionization fractions is included. Unlike earlier spectral generation codes it produces absorption from each particle close to the sight-line individually, rather than first producing an average density in each spectral pixel. Thus it preserves substantially more of the small-scale velocity structure of the gas. At time of writing, it supports both Gadget and Arepo.

The python module can be installed with:
pip install --user fake_spectra

[ascl:1509.004] FalconIC: Initial conditions generator for cosmological N-body simulations in Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified theories

FalconIC generates discrete particle positions, velocities, masses and pressures based on linear Boltzmann solutions that are computed by libraries such as CLASS and CAMB. FalconIC generates these initial conditions for any species included in the selection, including Baryons, Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy fluids. Any species can be set in Eulerian (on a fixed grid) or Lagrangian (particle motion) representation, depending on the gauge and reality chosen. That is, for relativistic initial conditions in the synchronous comoving gauge, Dark Matter can only be described in an Eulerian representation. For all other choices (Relativistic in Longitudinal gauge, Newtonian with relativistic expansion rates, Newtonian without any notion of radiation), all species can be treated in all representations. The code also computes spectra. FalconIC is useful for comparative studies on initial conditions.

[ascl:1402.016] FAMA: Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis

FAMA (Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis), written in Perl, computes the atmospheric parameters and abundances of a large number of stars using measurements of equivalent widths (EWs) automatically and independently of any subjective approach. Based on the widely-used MOOG code, it simultaneously searches for three equilibria, excitation equilibrium, ionization balance, and the relationship between logn(FeI) and the reduced EWs. FAMA also evaluates the statistical errors on individual element abundances and errors due to the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. Convergence criteria are not fixed "a priori" but instead are based on the quality of the spectra.

[ascl:1209.014] FAMIAS: Frequency Analysis and Mode Identification for AsteroSeismology

FAMIAS (Frequency Analysis and Mode Identification for Asteroseismology) is a package of software tools programmed in C++ for the analysis of photometric and spectroscopic time-series data. FAMIAS provides analysis tools that are required for the steps between the data reduction and the seismic modeling. Two main sets of tools are incorporated in FAMIAS. The first set permits to search for periodicities in the data using Fourier and non-linear least-squares fitting techniques. The other set permits to carry out a mode identification for the detected pulsation frequencies to determine their harmonic degree l, and azimuthal order m. FAMIAS is applicable to main-sequence pulsators hotter than the Sun. This includes Gamma Dor, Delta Sct stars, slowly pulsating B (SPB)-stars and Beta Cep stars - basically all stars for which empirical mode identification is required to successfully carry out asteroseismology.

[ascl:1102.017] FARGO: Fast Advection in Rotating Gaseous Objects

FARGO is an efficient and simple modification of the standard transport algorithm used in explicit eulerian fixed polar grid codes, aimed at getting rid of the average azimuthal velocity when applying the Courant condition. This results in a much larger timestep than the usual procedure, and it is particularly well-suited to the description of a Keplerian disk where one is traditionally limited by the very demanding Courant condition on the fast orbital motion at the inner boundary. In this modified algorithm, the timestep is limited by the perturbed velocity and by the shear arising from the differential rotation. The speed-up resulting from the use of the FARGO algorithm is problem dependent. In the example presented in the code paper below, which shows the evolution of a Jupiter sized protoplanet embedded in a minimum mass protoplanetary nebula, the FARGO algorithm is about an order of magnitude faster than a traditional transport scheme, with a much smaller numerical diffusivity.

[ascl:1509.006] FARGO3D: Hydrodynamics/magnetohydrodynamics code

A successor of FARGO (ascl:1102.017), FARGO3D is a versatile HD/MHD code that runs on clusters of CPUs or GPUs, with special emphasis on protoplanetary disks. FARGO3D offers Cartesian, cylindrical or spherical geometry; 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional calculations; and orbital advection (aka FARGO) for HD and MHD calculations. As in FARGO, a simple Runge-Kutta N-body solver may be used to describe the orbital evolution of embedded point-like objects. There is no need to know CUDA; users can develop new functions in C and have them translated to CUDA automatically to run on GPUs.

[submitted] Fast Template Periodogram

The Fast Template Periodogram extends the Generalised Lomb Scargle periodogram (Zechmeister and Kurster 2009) for arbitrary (periodic) signal shapes. A template is first approximated by a truncated Fourier series of length H. The Nonequispaced Fast Fourier Transform NFFT is used to efficiently compute frequency-dependent sums. Template fitting can now be done in NlogN time, improving existing algorithms by an order of magnitude for even small datasets. The FTP can be used in conjunction with gradient descent to accelerate a non-linear model fit, or be used in place of the multi-harmonic periodogram for non-sinusoidal signals with a priori known shapes.

[ascl:1010.010] Fast WMAP Likelihood Code and GSR PC Functions

We place functional constraints on the shape of the inflaton potential from the cosmic microwave background through a variant of the generalized slow roll approximation that allows large amplitude, rapidly changing deviations from scale-free conditions. Employing a principal component decomposition of the source function G'~3(V'/V)^2 - 2V''/V and keeping only those measured to better than 10% results in 5 nearly independent Gaussian constraints that maybe used to test any single-field inflationary model where such deviations are expected. The first component implies < 3% variations at the 100 Mpc scale. One component shows a 95% CL preference for deviations around the 300 Mpc scale at the ~10% level but the global significance is reduced considering the 5 components examined. This deviation also requires a change in the cold dark matter density which in a flat LCDM model is disfavored by current supernova and Hubble constant data and can be tested with future polarization or high multipole temperature data. Its impact resembles a local running of the tilt from multipoles 30-800 but is only marginally consistent with a constant running beyond this range. For this analysis, we have implemented a ~40x faster WMAP7 likelihood method which we have made publicly available.

[ascl:1603.006] FAST-PT: Convolution integrals in cosmological perturbation theory calculator

FAST-PT calculates 1-loop corrections to the matter power spectrum in cosmology. The code utilizes Fourier methods combined with analytic expressions to reduce the computation time down to scale as N log N, where N is the number of grid point in the input linear power spectrum. FAST-PT is extremely fast, enabling mode-coupling integral computations fast enough to embed in Monte Carlo Markov Chain parameter estimation.

[ascl:1010.037] FastChi: A Fast Chi-squared Technique For Period Search of Irregularly Sampled Data

The Fast Chi-Squared Algorithm is a fast, powerful technique for detecting periodicity. It was developed for analyzing variable stars, but is applicable to many of the other applications where the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) or other periodograms (such as Lomb-Scargle) are currently used. The Fast Chi-squared technique takes a data set (e.g. the brightness of a star measured at many different times during a series of observations) and finds the periodic function that has the best frequency and shape (to an arbitrary number of harmonics) to fit the data. Among its advantages are:

  • Statistical efficiency: all of the data are used, weighted by their individual error bars, giving a result with a significance calibrated in well-understood Chi-squared statistics.
  • Sensitivity to harmonic content: many conventional techniques look only at the significance (or the amplitude) of the fundamental sinusoid and discard the power of the higher harmonics.
  • Insensitivity to the sample timing: you won't find a period of 24 hours just because you take your observations at night. You do not need to window your data.
  • The frequency search is gridded more tightly than the traditional "integer number of cycles over the span of observations", eliminating power loss from peaks that fall between the grid points.
  • Computational speed: The complexity of the algorithm is O(NlogN), where N is the number of frequencies searched, due to its use of the FFT.

[ascl:9910.003] FASTELL: Fast calculation of a family of elliptical mass gravitational lens models

Because of their simplicity, axisymmetric mass distributions are often used to model gravitational lenses. Since galaxies are usually observed to have elliptical light distributions, mass distributions with elliptical density contours offer more general and realistic lens models. They are difficult to use, however, since previous studies have shown that the deflection angle (and magnification) in this case can only be obtained by rather expensive numerical integrations. We present a family of lens models for which the deflection can be calculated to high relative accuracy (10-5) with a greatly reduced numerical effort, for small and large ellipticity alike. This makes it easier to use these distributions for modeling individual lenses as well as for applications requiring larger computing times, such as statistical lensing studies. FASTELL is a code to calculate quickly and accurately the lensing deflection and magnification matrix for the softened power-law elliptical mass distribution (SPEMD) lens galaxy model. The SPEMD consists of a softened power-law radial distribution with elliptical isodensity contours.

[ascl:1010.041] FASTLens (FAst STatistics for weak Lensing): Fast Method for Weak Lensing Statistics and Map Making

The analysis of weak lensing data requires to account for missing data such as masking out of bright stars. To date, the majority of lensing analyses uses the two point-statistics of the cosmic shear field. These can either be studied directly using the two-point correlation function, or in Fourier space, using the power spectrum. The two-point correlation function is unbiased by missing data but its direct calculation will soon become a burden with the exponential growth of astronomical data sets. The power spectrum is fast to estimate but a mask correction should be estimated. Other statistics can be used but these are strongly sensitive to missing data. The solution that is proposed by FASTLens is to properly fill-in the gaps with only NlogN operations, leading to a complete weak lensing mass map from which one can compute straight forwardly and with a very good accuracy any kind of statistics like power spectrum or bispectrum.

[ascl:1302.008] FASTPHOT: A simple and quick IDL PSF-fitting routine

PSF fitting photometry allows a simultaneously fit of a PSF profile on the sources. Many routines use PSF fitting photometry, including IRAF/allstar, Strarfinder, and Convphot. These routines are in general complex to use and slow. FASTPHOT is optimized for prior extraction (the position of the sources is known) and is very fast and simple.

[ascl:1507.011] FAT: Fully Automated TiRiFiC

FAT (Fully Automated TiRiFiC) is an automated procedure that fits tilted-ring models to Hi data cubes of individual, well-resolved galaxies. The method builds on the 3D Tilted Ring Fitting Code (TiRiFiC, ascl:1208.008). FAT accurately models the kinematics and the morphologies of galaxies with an extent of eight beams across the major axis in the inclination range 20°-90° without the need for priors such as disc inclination. FAT's performance allows us to model the gas kinematics of many thousands of well-resolved galaxies, which is essential for future HI surveys, with the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders.

[ascl:1505.014] FCLC: Featureless Classification of Light Curves

FCLC (Featureless Classification of Light Curves) software describes the static behavior of a light curve in a probabilistic way. Individual data points are converted to densities and consequently probability density are compared instead of features. This gives rise to an independent classification which can corroborate the usefulness of the selected features.

[ascl:1705.012] fd3: Spectral disentangling of double-lined spectroscopic binary stars

The spectral disentangling technique can be applied on a time series of observed spectra of a spectroscopic double-lined binary star (SB2) to determine the parameters of orbit and reconstruct the spectra of component stars, without the use of template spectra. fd3 disentangles the spectra of SB2 stars, capable also of resolving the possible third companion. It performs the separation of spectra in the Fourier space which is faster, but in several respects less versatile than the wavelength-space separation. (Wavelength-space separation is implemented in the twin code CRES.) fd3 is written in C and is designed as a command-line utility for a Unix-like operating system. fd3 is a new version of FDBinary (ascl:1705.011), which is now deprecated.

[ascl:1705.011] FDBinary: A tool for spectral disentangling of double-lined spectroscopic binary stars

FDBinary disentangles spectra of SB2 stars. The spectral disentangling technique can be applied on a time series of observed spectra of an SB2 to determine the parameters of orbit and reconstruct the spectra of component stars, without the use of template spectra. The code is written in C and is designed as a command-line utility for a Unix-like operating system. FDBinary uses the Fourier-space approach in separation of composite spectra. This code has been replaced with the newer fd3 (ascl:1705.012).

[ascl:1606.011] FDIPS: Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver

FDIPS is a finite difference iterative potential-field solver that can generate the 3D potential magnetic field solution based on a magnetogram. It is offered as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach, as when the number of spherical harmonics is increased, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. FDIPS is written in Fortran 90 and uses the MPI library for parallel execution.

[ascl:1604.011] FDPS: Framework for Developing Particle Simulators

FDPS provides the necessary functions for efficient parallel execution of particle-based simulations as templates independent of the data structure of particles and the functional form of the interaction. It is used to develop particle-based simulation programs for large-scale distributed-memory parallel supercomputers. FDPS includes templates for domain decomposition, redistribution of particles, and gathering of particle information for interaction calculation. It uses algorithms such as Barnes-Hut tree method for long-range interactions; methods to limit the calculation to neighbor particles are used for short-range interactions. FDPS reduces the time and effort necessary to write a simple, sequential and unoptimized program of O(N^2) calculation cost, and produces compiled programs that will run efficiently on large-scale parallel supercomputers.

[ascl:1203.004] FERENGI: Full and Efficient Redshifting of Ensembles of Nearby Galaxy Images

Bandpass shifting and the (1+z)5 surface brightness dimming (for a fixed width filter) make standard tools for the extraction of structural parameters of galaxies wavelength dependent. If only few (or one) observed high-res bands exist, this dependence has to be corrected to make unbiased statements on the evolution of structural parameters or on galaxy subsamples defined by morphology. FERENGI artificially redshifts low-redshift galaxy images to different redshifts by applying the correct cosmological corrections for size, surface brightness and bandpass shifting. A set of artificially redshifted galaxies in the range 0.1<z<1.1 using a set of ~100 SDSS low-redshift (v<7000 km s-1) images as input has been created to use as a training set of realistic images of galaxies of diverse morphologies and a large range of redshifts for the GEMS and COSMOS galaxy evolution projects. This training set allows other studies to investigate and quantify the effects of cosmological redshift on the determination of galaxy morphologies, distortions, and other galaxy properties that are potentially sensitive to resolution, surface brightness, and bandpass issues. The data sets are also available for download from the FERENGI website.

[ascl:1208.011] Fewbody: Numerical toolkit for simulating small-N gravitational dynamics

Fewbody is a numerical toolkit for simulating small-N gravitational dynamics. It is a general N-body dynamics code, although it was written for the purpose of performing scattering experiments, and therefore has several features that make it well-suited for this purpose. Fewbody uses the 8th-order Runge-Kutta Prince-Dormand integration method with 9th-order error estimate and adaptive timestep to advance the N-body system forward in time. It integrates the usual formulation of the N-body equations in configuration space, but allows for the option of global pairwise Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (K-S) regularization (Heggie 1974; Mikkola 1985). The code uses a binary tree algorithm to classify the N-body system into a set of independently bound hierarchies, and performs collisions between stars in the “sticky star” approximation. Fewbody contains a collection of command line utilities that can be used to perform individual scattering and N-body interactions, but is more generally a library of functions that can be used from within other codes.

[ascl:1512.017] FFTLog: Fast Fourier or Hankel transform

FFTLog is a set of Fortran subroutines that compute the fast Fourier or Hankel (= Fourier-Bessel) transform of a periodic sequence of logarithmically spaced points. FFTLog can be regarded as a natural analogue to the standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), in the sense that, just as the normal FFT gives the exact (to machine precision) Fourier transform of a linearly spaced periodic sequence, so also FFTLog gives the exact Fourier or Hankel transform, of arbitrary order m, of a logarithmically spaced periodic sequence.

[ascl:1201.015] FFTW: Fastest Fourier Transform in the West

FFTW is a C subroutine library for computing the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) in one or more dimensions, of arbitrary input size, and of both real and complex data (as well as of even/odd data, i.e. the discrete cosine/sine transforms or DCT/DST).

Benchmarks performed on a variety of platforms show that FFTW's performance is typically superior to that of other publicly available FFT software, and is even competitive with vendor-tuned codes. In contrast to vendor-tuned codes, however, FFTW's performance is portable: the same program will perform well on most architectures without modification.

The FFTW library is required by other codes such as StarCrash and Hammurabi.

[ascl:1603.014] fibmeasure: Python/Cython module to find the center of back-illuminated optical fibers in metrology images

fibmeasure finds the precise locations of the centers of back-illuminated optical fibers in images. It was developed for astronomical fiber positioning feedback via machine vision cameras and is optimized for high-magnification images where fibers appear as resolvable circles. It was originally written during the design of the WEAVE pick-and-place fiber positioner for the William Herschel Telescope.

[ascl:1111.013] FIBRE-pac: FMOS Image-based Reduction Package

The FIBRE-pac (FMOS image-based reduction package) is an IRAF-based reduction tool for the fiber multiple-object spectrograph (FMOS) of the Subaru telescope. To reduce FMOS images, a number of special techniques are necessary because each image contains about 200 separate spectra with airglow emission lines variable in spatial and time domains, and with complicated throughput patterns for the airglow masks. In spite of these features, almost all of the reduction processes except for a few steps are carried out automatically by scripts in text format making it easy to check the commands step by step. Wavelength- and flux-calibrated images together with their noise maps are obtained using this reduction package.

[ascl:1307.004] FieldInf: Field Inflation exact integration routines

FieldInf is a collection of fast modern Fortran routines for computing exactly the background evolution and primordial power spectra of any single field inflationary models. It implements reheating without any assumptions through the "reheating parameter" R allowing robust inflationary parameter estimations and inference on the reheating energy scale. The underlying perturbation code actually deals with N fields minimally-coupled and/or non-minimally coupled to gravity and works for flat FLRW only.

[ascl:1708.009] FIEStool: Automated data reduction for FIber-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES)

FIEStool automatically reduces data obtained with the FIber-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) at the Nordic Optical Telescope, a high-resolution spectrograph available on a stand-by basis, while also allowing the basic properties of the reduction to be controlled in real time by the user. It provides a Graphical User Interface and offers bias subtraction, flat-fielding, scattered-light subtraction, and specialized reduction tasks from the external packages IRAF (ascl:9911.002) and NumArray. The core of FIEStool is instrument-independent; the software, written in Python, could with minor modifications also be used for automatic reduction of data from other instruments.

[ascl:1203.013] Figaro: Data Reduction Software

Figaro is a data reduction system that originated at Caltech and whose development continued at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. Although it is intended to be able to deal with any sort of data, almost all its applications to date are geared towards processing optical and infrared data. Figaro uses hierarchical data structures to provide flexibility in its data file formats. Figaro was originally written to run under DEC's VMS operating system, but is now available both for VMS and for various flavours of UNIX.

[ascl:1608.009] FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

[ascl:1602.007] FilTER: Filament Trait-Evaluated Reconstruction

FilTER (Filament Trait-Evaluated Reconstruction) post-processes output from DisPerSE (ascl:1302.015 ) to produce a set of filaments that are well-defined and have measured properties (e.g. width), then cuts the profiles, fits and assesses them to reconstruct new filaments according to defined criteria.

[ascl:1202.014] FISA: Fast Integrated Spectra Analyzer

FISA (Fast Integrated Spectra Analyzer) permits fast and reasonably accurate age and reddening determinations for small angular diameter open clusters by using their integrated spectra in the (3600-7400) AA range and currently available template spectrum libraries. This algorithm and its implementation help to achieve astrophysical results in shorter times than from other methods. FISA has successfully been applied to integrated spectroscopy of open clusters, both in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic Clouds, to determine ages and reddenings.

[ascl:1010.070] Fisher.py: Fisher Matrix Manipulation and Confidence Contour Plotting

Fisher.py allows you to combine constraints from multiple experiments (e.g., weak lensing + supernovae) and add priors (e.g., a flat universe) simply and easily. Calculate parameter uncertainties and plot confidence ellipses. Fisher matrix expectations for several experiments are included as calculated by myself (time delays) and the Dark Energy Task Force (WL/SN/BAO/CL/CMB), or provide your own.

[ascl:1201.007] Fisher4Cast: Fisher Matrix Toolbox

The Fisher4Cast suite, which requires MatLab, provides a standard, tested tool set for general Fisher Information matrix prediction and forecasting for use in both research and education. The toolbox design is robust and modular, allowing for easy additions and adaptation while keeping the user interface intuitive and easy to use. Fisher4Cast is completely general but the default is coded for cosmology. It provides parameter error forecasts for cosmological surveys providing distance, Hubble expansion and growth measurements in a general, curved FLRW background.

[ascl:1609.004] FISHPACK: Efficient FORTRAN Subprograms for the Solution of Separable Elliptic Partial Differential Equations

The FISHPACK collection of Fortran77 subroutines solves second- and fourth-order finite difference approximations to separable elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). These include Helmholtz equations in cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, as well as more general separable elliptic equations. The solvers use the cyclic reduction algorithm. When the problem is singular, a least-squares solution is computed. Singularities induced by the coordinate system are handled, including at the origin r=0 in cylindrical coordinates, and at the poles in spherical coordinates.

[ascl:1609.005] FISHPACK90: Efficient FORTRAN Subprograms for the Solution of Separable Elliptic Partial Differential Equations

FISHPACK90 is a modernization of the original FISHPACK (ascl:1609.004), employing Fortran90 to slightly simplify and standardize the interface to some of the routines. This collection of Fortran programs and subroutines solves second- and fourth-order finite difference approximations to separable elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). These include Helmholtz equations in cartesian, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, as well as more general separable elliptic equations. The solvers use the cyclic reduction algorithm. When the problem is singular, a least-squares solution is computed. Singularities induced by the coordinate system are handled, including at the origin r=0 in cylindrical coordinates, and at the poles in spherical coordinates. Test programs are provided for the 19 solvers. Each serves two purposes: as a template to guide you in writing your own codes utilizing the FISHPACK90 solvers, and as a demonstration on your computer that you can correctly produce FISHPACK90 executables.

[ascl:1601.016] Fit Kinematic PA: Fit the global kinematic position-angle of galaxies

Fit kinematic PA measures the global kinematic position-angle (PA) from integral field observations of a galaxy stellar or gas kinematics; the code is available in IDL and Python.

[ascl:1609.015] FIT3D: Fitting optical spectra

FIT3D fits optical spectra to deblend the underlying stellar population and the ionized gas, and extract physical information from each component. FIT3D is focused on the analysis of Integral Field Spectroscopy data, but is not restricted to it, and is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of datasets like CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI. It can run iteratively or in an automatic way to derive the parameters of a large set of spectra.

[ascl:1305.011] FITDisk: Cataclysmic Variable Accretion Disk Demonstration Tool

FITDisk models accretion disk phenomena using a fully three-dimensional hydrodynamics calculation, and data can either be visualized as they are computed or stored to hard drive for later playback at a fast frame rate. Simulations are visualized using OpenGL graphics and the viewing angle can be changed interactively. Pseudo light curves of simulated systems can be plotted along with the associated Fourier amplitude spectrum. It provides an easy to use graphical user interface as well as 3-D interactive graphics. The code computes the evolution of a CV accretion disk, visualizes results in real time, records and plays back simulations, and generates and plots pseudo light curves and associated power spectra.

[ascl:1206.002] FITS Liberator: Image processing software

The ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator makes it possible to process and edit astronomical science data in the FITS format to produce stunning images of the universe. Formerly a plugin for Adobe Photoshop, the current version of FITS Liberator is a stand-alone application and no longer requires Photoshop. This image processing software makes it possible to create color images using raw observations from a range of telescopes; the FITS Liberator continues to support the FITS and PDS formats, preferred by astronomers and planetary scientists respectively, which enables data to be processed from a wide range of telescopes and planetary probes, including ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, ESA’s XMM–Newton Telescope and Cassini–Huygens or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

[ascl:1505.029] fits2hdf: FITS to HDFITS conversion

fits2hdf ports FITS files to Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files in the HDFITS format. HDFITS allows faster reading of data, higher compression ratios, and higher throughput. HDFITS formatted data can be presented transparently as an in-memory FITS equivalent by changing the import lines in Python-based FITS utilities. fits2hdf includes a utility to port MeasurementSets (MS) to HDF5 files.

[ascl:1111.014] FITSH: Software Package for Image Processing

FITSH provides a standalone environment for analysis of data acquired by imaging astronomical detectors. The package provides utilities both for the full pipeline of subsequent related data processing steps (including image calibration, astrometry, source identification, photometry, differential analysis, low-level arithmetic operations, multiple image combinations, spatial transformations and interpolations, etc.) and for aiding the interpretation of the (mainly photometric and/or astrometric) results. The package also features a consistent implementation of photometry based on image subtraction, point spread function fitting and aperture photometry and provides easy-to-use interfaces for comparisons and for picking the most suitable method for a particular problem. The utilities in the package are built on the top of the commonly used UNIX/POSIX shells (hence the name of the package), therefore both frequently used and well-documented tools for such environments can be exploited and managing massive amount of data is rather convenient.

[ascl:1107.003] FITSManager: Management of Personal Astronomical Data

With the increase of personal storage capacity, it is easy to find hundreds to thousands of FITS files in the personal computer of an astrophysicist. Because Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is a professional data format initiated by astronomers and used mainly in the small community, data management toolkits for FITS files are very few. Astronomers need a powerful tool to help them manage their local astronomical data. Although Virtual Observatory (VO) is a network oriented astronomical research environment, its applications and related technologies provide useful solutions to enhance the management and utilization of astronomical data hosted in an astronomer's personal computer. FITSManager is such a tool to provide astronomers an efficient management and utilization of their local data, bringing VO to astronomers in a seamless and transparent way. FITSManager provides fruitful functions for FITS file management, like thumbnail, preview, type dependent icons, header keyword indexing and search, collaborated working with other tools and online services, and so on. The development of the FITSManager is an effort to fill the gap between management and analysis of astronomical data.

[ascl:1709.011] FLaapLUC: Fermi-LAT automatic aperture photometry light curve

Most high energy sources detected with Fermi-LAT are blazars, which are highly variable sources. High cadence long-term monitoring simultaneously at different wavelengths being prohibitive, the study of their transient activities can help shed light on our understanding of these objects. The early detection of such potentially fast transient events is the key for triggering follow-up observations at other wavelengths. FLaapLUC (Fermi-LAT automatic aperture photometry Light C↔Urve) uses the simple aperture photometry approach to effectively detect relative flux variations in a set of predefined sources and alert potential users. Such alerts can then be used to trigger observations of these sources with other facilities. The FLaapLUC pipeline is built on top of the Science Tools provided by the Fermi-LAT collaboration and quickly generates short- or long-term Fermi-LAT light curves.

[ascl:1112.007] FLAGCAL: FLAGging and CALlibration Pipeline for GMRT Data

FLAGging and CALlibration (FLAGCAL) is a software pipeline developed for automatic flagging and calibration of the GMRT data. This pipeline can be used for preprocessing (before importing the data in AIPS) any other interferromteric data also (given that the data file is in FITS format and contains multiple channels & scans).There are also a few GUI based tools which can be used for quick visualization of the data.

[ascl:1010.082] FLASH: Adaptive Mesh Hydrodynamics Code for Modeling Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes

The FLASH code, currently in its 4th version, is a publicly available high performance application code which has evolved into a modular, extensible software system from a collection of unconnected legacy codes. FLASH consists of inter-operable modules that can be combined to generate different applications. The FLASH architecture allows arbitrarily many alternative implementations of its components to co-exist and interchange with each other. A simple and elegant mechanism exists for customization of code functionality without the need to modify the core implementation of the source. A built-in unit test framework combined with regression tests that run nightly on multiple platforms verify the code.

[ascl:1606.015] FLASK: Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit

FLASK (Full-sky Lognormal Astro-fields Simulation Kit) makes tomographic realizations on the sphere of an arbitrary number of correlated lognormal or Gaussian random fields; it can create joint simulations of clustering and lensing with sub-per-cent accuracy over relevant angular scales and redshift ranges. It is C++ code parallelized with OpenMP; FLASK generates fast full-sky simulations of cosmological large-scale structure observables such as multiple matter density tracers (galaxies, quasars, dark matter haloes), CMB temperature anisotropies and weak lensing convergence and shear fields. The mutiple fields can be generated tomographically in an arbitrary number of redshift slices and all their statistical properties (including cross-correlations) are determined by the angular power spectra supplied as input and the multivariate lognormal (or Gaussian) distribution assumed for the fields. Effects like redshift space distortions, doppler distortions, magnification biases, evolution and intrinsic aligments can be introduced in the simulations via the input power spectra which must be supplied by the user.

[ascl:1612.006] flexCE: Flexible one-zone chemical evolution code

flexCE (flexible Chemical Evolution) computes the evolution of a one-zone chemical evolution model with inflow and outflow in which gas is instantaneously and completely mixed. It can be used to demonstrate the sensitivity of chemical evolution models to parameter variations, show the effect of CCSN yields on chemical evolution models, and reproduce the 2D distribution in [O/Fe]{[Fe/H] by mixing models with a range of inflow and outflow histories. It can also post-process cosmological simulations to predict element distributions.

[ascl:1107.004] Flexible DM-NRG

This code combines the spectral sum-conserving methods of Weichselbaum and von Delft and of Peters, Pruschke and Anders (both relying upon the complete basis set construction of Anders and Schiller) with the use of non-Abelian symmetries in a flexible manner: Essentially any non-Abelian symmetry can be taught to the code, and any number of such symmetries can be used throughout the computation for any density of states, and to compute any local operators' correlation function's real and imaginary parts or any thermodynamical expectation value. The code works both at zero and finite temperatures.

[ascl:1205.006] Flexion: IDL code for calculating gravitational flexion

Gravitational flexion is a technique for measuring 2nd order gravitational lensing signals in background galaxies and radio lobes. Unlike shear, flexion directly probes variations of the potential field. Moreover, the information contained in flexion is orthogonal to what is found in the shear. Thus, we get the information "for free."

[ascl:1411.016] Flicker: Mean stellar densities from flicker

Flicker calculates the mean stellar density of a star by inputting the flicker observed in a photometric time series. Written in Fortran90, its output may be used as an informative prior on stellar density when fitting transit light curves.

[ascl:1210.007] FLUKA: Fully integrated particle physics Monte Carlo simulation package

FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) is a general-purpose tool for calculations of particle transport and interactions with matter. FLUKA can simulate with high accuracy the interaction and propagation in matter of about 60 different particles, including photons and electrons from 1 keV to thousands of TeV, neutrinos, muons of any energy, hadrons of energies up to 20 TeV (up to 10 PeV by linking FLUKA with the DPMJET code) and all the corresponding antiparticles, neutrons down to thermal energies and heavy ions. The program, written in Fortran, can also transport polarised photons (e.g., synchrotron radiation) and optical photons. Time evolution and tracking of emitted radiation from unstable residual nuclei can be performed online.

[ascl:1105.008] Flux Tube Model

This Fortran code computes magnetohydrostatic flux tubes and sheets according to the method of Steiner, Pneuman, & Stenflo (1986) A&A 170, 126-137. The code has many parameters contained in one input file that are easily modified. Extensive documentation is provided in README files.

[ascl:1405.010] FLUXES: Position and flux density of planets

FLUXES calculates approximate topocentric positions of the planets and also integrated flux densities of five of them at several wavelengths. These provide calibration information at the effective frequencies and beam-sizes employed by the UKT14, SCUBA and SCUBA-2 receivers on the JCMT telescope based on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. FLUXES is part of the bundle that comprises the Starlink multi-purpose astronomy software package (ascl:1110.012).

[ascl:1011.019] FLY: MPI-2 High Resolution code for LSS Cosmological Simulations

Cosmological simulations of structures and galaxies formations have played a fundamental role in the study of the origin, formation and evolution of the Universe. These studies improved enormously with the use of supercomputers and parallel systems and, recently, grid based systems and Linux clusters. Now we present the new version of the tree N-body parallel code FLY that runs on a PC Linux Cluster using the one side communication paradigm MPI-2 and we show the performances obtained. FLY is included in the Computer Physics Communication Program Library. This new version was developed using the Linux Cluster of CINECA, an IBM Cluster with 1024 Intel Xeon Pentium IV 3.0 Ghz. The results show that it is possible to run a 64 Million particle simulation in less than 15 minutes for each timestep, and the code scalability with the number of processors is achieved. This lead us to propose FLY as a code to run very large N-Body simulations with more than $10^{9}$ particles with the higher resolution of a pure tree code.

[ascl:1701.007] Forecaster: Mass and radii of planets predictor

Forecaster predicts the mass (or radius) from the radius (or mass) for objects covering nine orders-of-magnitude in mass. It is an unbiased forecasting model built upon a probabilistic mass-radius relation conditioned on a sample of 316 well-constrained objects. It accounts for observational errors, hyper-parameter uncertainties and the intrinsic dispersions observed in the calibration sample.

[ascl:1405.007] FORWARD: Forward modeling of coronal observables

FORWARD forward models various coronal observables and can access and compare existing data. Given a coronal model, it can produce many different synthetic observables (including Stokes polarimetry), as well as plots of model plasma properties (density, magnetic field, etc.). It uses the CHIANTI database (ascl:9911.004) and CLE polarimetry synthesis code, works with numerical model datacubes, interfaces with the PFSS module of SolarSoft (ascl:1208.013), includes several analytic models, and connects to the Virtual Solar Observatory for downloading data in a format directly comparable to model predictions.

[ascl:1204.004] Fosite: 2D advection problem solver

Fosite implements a method for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. It is written in Fortran 90/95 integrating object-oriented (OO) design patterns, incorporating the flexibility of OO-programming into Fortran 90/95 while preserving the efficiency of the numerical computation. Although mainly intended for CFD simulations, Fosite's modular design allows its application to other advection problems as well. Unlike other two-dimensional implementations of finite volume methods, it accounts for local conservation of specific angular momentum. This feature turns the program into a perfect tool for astrophysical simulations where angular momentum transport is crucial. Angular momentum transport is not only implemented for standard coordinate systems with rotational symmetry (i.e. cylindrical, spherical) but also for a general set of orthogonal coordinate systems allowing the use of exotic curvilinear meshes (e.g. oblate-spheroidal). As in the case of the advection problem, this part of the software is also kept modular, therefore new geometries may be incorporated into the framework in a straightforward manner.

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