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Results 1-50 of 1658 (1634 ASCL, 24 submitted)

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[submitted] DaCHS

DaCHS, the Data Center Helper Suite, is an integrated package for publishing astronomical data sets to the Virtual Observatory. Network-facing, it speaks the major VO protocols (SCS, SIAP, SSAP, TAP, Datalink, etc). Operator-facing, many input formats, including FITS/WCS, ASCII files, and VOTable, can be processed to publication-ready data. DaCHS puts particular emphasis on integrated metadata handling, which facilitates a tight integration with the VO's Registry

[submitted] AstroCV - A computer vision library for Astronomy

We present AstroCV, a computer vision library for processing and analyzing big astronomical datasets.
The goal of AstroCV is to provide a community repository of high performance Python and C++ algorithms used in the areas of image processing and computer vision.

The current AstroCV library includes methods for the tasks of object recognition, segmentation and classification, with emphasis in the automatic detection and classification of galaxies.
The underlying models were trained using convolutional neural networks and deep learning techniques, which provide better results than methods based on manual feature engineering and SVMs.
The detection and classification methods were trained end-to-end using public datasets such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Galaxy Zoo, and private datasets such as the Next Generation Virgo (NGVS) and Fornax (NGFS) surveys.

Training results are strongly bound to the conversion method from raw FITS data for each band into a 3-channel color image. Therefore, we propose data augmentation for the training using 5 conversion methods. This greatly improves the overall galaxy detection and classification for images produced from different instruments, bands and data reduction procedures.

The detection and classification methods were trained using the deep learning framework DARKNET and the real-time object detection system YOLO. These methods are implemented in C and CUDA languages and makes intensive use of graphical processing units (GPU). Using a single high-end Nvidia GPU card, it can process a SDSS image in 50 milliseconds and a DECam image in less than 3 seconds.

We provide the open source code, documentation, pre-trained networks, python tutorials for using the AstroCV library and train your own datasets.

[ascl:1803.006] MulensModel: Microlensing light curves modeling

MulensModel calculates light curves of microlensing events. Both single and binary lens events are modeled and various higher-order effects can be included: extended source (with limb-darkening), annual microlensing parallax, and satellite microlensing parallax. The code is object-oriented and written in Python3, and requires AstroPy (ascl:1304.002).

[ascl:1803.005] Kadenza: Kepler/K2 Raw Cadence Data Reader

Kadenza enables time-critical data analyses to be carried out using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. It enables users to convert Kepler's raw data files into user-friendly Target Pixel Files upon downlink from the spacecraft. The primary motivation for this tool is to enable the microlensing, supernova, and exoplanet communities to create quicklook lightcurves for transient events which require rapid follow-up.

[ascl:1803.004] nanopipe: Calibration and data reduction pipeline for pulsar timing

nanopipe is a data reduction pipeline for calibration, RFI removal, and pulse time-of-arrival measurement from radio pulsar data. It was developed primarily for use by the NANOGrav project. nanopipe is written in Python, and depends on the PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) library.

[ascl:1803.003] scarlet: Source separation in multi-band images by Constrained Matrix Factorization

SCARLET performs source separation (aka "deblending") on multi-band images. It is geared towards optical astronomy, where scenes are composed of stars and galaxies, but it is straightforward to apply it to other imaging data. Separation is achieved through a constrained matrix factorization, which models each source with a Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) and a non-parametric morphology, or multiple such components per source. The code performs forced photometry (with PSF matching if needed) using an optimal weight function given by the signal-to-noise weighted morphology across bands. The approach works well if the sources in the scene have different colors and can be further strengthened by imposing various additional constraints/priors on each source. Because of its generic utility, this package provides a stand-alone implementation that contains the core components of the source separation algorithm. However, the development of this package is part of the LSST Science Pipeline; the meas_deblender package contains a wrapper to implement the algorithms here for the LSST stack.

[ascl:1803.002] CIFOG: Cosmological Ionization Fields frOm Galaxies

CIFOG is a versatile MPI-parallelised semi-numerical tool to perform simulations of the Epoch of Reionization. From a set of evolving cosmological gas density and ionizing emissivity fields, it computes the time and spatially dependent ionization of neutral hydrogen (HI), neutral (HeI) and singly ionized helium (HeII) in the intergalactic medium (IGM). The code accounts for HII, HeII, HeIII recombinations, and provides different descriptions for the photoionization rate that are used to calculate the residual HI fraction in ionized regions. This tool has been designed to be coupled to semi-analytic galaxy formation models or hydrodynamical simulations. The modular fashion of the code allows the user to easily introduce new descriptions for recombinations and the photoionization rate.

[submitted] PyVO: a package providing access to the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python

PyVO is a package providing access to remote data and services of the Virtual observatory (VO) using Python. It takes advantage VO standards to interface to tens of thousands of catalogs, data archives, information services, and analysis tools. PyVO is built on top of Astopy (and numpy).

The VO protocols support by pyVO include the Table Access Protocol TAP, the Simple Image and Spectra Access Protocols (SIAP, SSAP), Simple Cone Search (SCS), the VO services interface VOSI, and Datalink.

[ascl:1803.001] DaMaSCUS-CRUST: Dark Matter Simulation Code for Underground Scatterings - Crust Edition

DaMaSCUS-CRUST determines the critical cross-section for strongly interacting DM for various direct detection experiments systematically and precisely using Monte Carlo simulations of DM trajectories inside the Earth's crust, atmosphere, or any kind of shielding. Above a critical dark matter-nucleus scattering cross section, any terrestrial direct detection experiment loses sensitivity to dark matter, since the Earth crust, atmosphere, and potential shielding layers start to block off the dark matter particles. This critical cross section is commonly determined by describing the average energy loss of the dark matter particles analytically. However, this treatment overestimates the stopping power of the Earth crust; therefore, the obtained bounds should be considered as conservative. DaMaSCUS-CRUST is a modified version of DaMaSCUS (ascl:1706.003) that accounts for shielding effects and returns a precise exclusion band.

[ascl:1802.016] eqpair: Electron energy distribution calculator

eqpair computes the electron energy distribution resulting from a balance between heating and direct acceleration of particles, and cooling processes. Electron-positron pair balance, bremstrahlung, and Compton cooling, including external soft photon input, are among the processes considered, and the final electron distribution can be hybrid, thermal, or non-thermal.

[ascl:1802.015] mrpy: Renormalized generalized gamma distribution for HMF and galaxy ensemble properties comparisons

mrpy calculates the MRP parameterization of the Halo Mass Function. It calculates basic statistics of the truncated generalized gamma distribution (TGGD) with the TGGD class, including mean, mode, variance, skewness, pdf, and cdf. It generates MRP quantities with the MRP class, such as differential number counts and cumulative number counts, and offers various methods for generating normalizations. It can generate the MRP-based halo mass function as a function of physical parameters via the mrp_b13 function, and fit MRP parameters to data in the form of arbitrary curves and in the form of a sample of variates with the SimFit class. mrpy also calculates analytic hessians and jacobians at any point, and allows the user to alternate parameterizations of the same form via the reparameterize module.

[ascl:1802.014] collapse: Spherical-collapse model code

collapse calculates the spherical−collapse for standard cosmological models as well as for dark energy models when the dark energy can be taken to be spatially homogeneous. The calculation is valid on sub−horizon scales and takes a top−hat perturbation to exist in an otherwise featureless cosmos and follows its evolution into the non−linear regime where it reaches a maximum size and then recollapses. collapse provides the user with the linear−collapse threshold (delta_c) and the virial overdensity (Delta_v) for the collapsed halo over a range of cosmic scale factors.

[ascl:1802.013] BHMcalc: Binary Habitability Mechanism Calculator

BHMcalc provides renditions of the instantaneous circumbinary habital zone (CHZ) and also calculates BHM properties of the system including those related to the rotational evolution of the stellar components and the combined XUV and SW fluxes as measured at different distances from the binary. Moreover, it provides numerical results that can be further manipulated and used to calculate other properties.

[ascl:1802.012] PyOSE: Orbital sampling effect (OSE) simulator

PyOSE is a fully numerical orbital sampling effect (OSE) simulator that can model arbitrary inclinations of the transiting moon orbit. It can be used to search for exomoons in long-term stellar light curves such as those by Kepler and the upcoming PLATO mission.

[ascl:1802.011] runDM: Running couplings of Dark Matter to the Standard Model

runDM calculates the running of the couplings of Dark Matter (DM) to the Standard Model (SM) in simplified models with vector mediators. By specifying the mass of the mediator and the couplings of the mediator to SM fields at high energy, the code can calculate the couplings at low energy, taking into account the mixing of all dimension-6 operators. runDM can also extract the operator coefficients relevant for direct detection, namely low energy couplings to up, down and strange quarks and to protons and neutrons.

[ascl:1802.010] Glimpse: Sparsity based weak lensing mass-mapping tool

Glimpse, also known as Glimpse2D, is a weak lensing mass-mapping tool that relies on a robust sparsity-based regularization scheme to recover high resolution convergence from either gravitational shear alone or from a combination of shear and flexion. Including flexion allows the supplementation of the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map. To preserve all available small scale information, Glimpse avoids any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treats the mass-mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, regularized using a multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators.

[ascl:1802.009] astroplan: Observation planning package for astronomers

astroplan is a flexible toolbox for observation planning and scheduling. It is powered by Astropy (ascl:1304.002); it works for Python beginners and new observers, and is powerful enough for observatories preparing nightly and long-term schedules as well. It calculates rise/set/meridian transit times, alt/az positions for targets at observatories anywhere on Earth, and offers built-in plotting convenience functions for standard observation planning plots (airmass, parallactic angle, sky maps). It can also determine the observability of sets of targets given an arbitrary set of constraints (i.e., altitude, airmass, moon separation/illumination, etc.).

[ascl:1802.008] AntiparticleDM: Discriminating between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter

AntiparticleDM calculates the prospects of future direct detection experiments to discriminate between Majorana and Dirac Dark Matter (i.e., to determine whether Dark Matter is its own antiparticle). Direct detection event rates and mock data generation are dealt with by a variation of the WIMpy code.

[ascl:1802.007] HiGal_SED_Fitter: SED fitting tools for Herschel Hi-Gal data

HiGal SED Fitter fits modified blackbody SEDs to Herschel data, specifically targeted at Herschel Hi-Gal data.

[submitted] muLAn (MICROlensing Analysis software): a public software to model gravitational microlensing events

muLAn is a Python modeling software developed to analyze and fit light curves of gravitational microlensing events. The software has been designed to be easy to use even for the newcomer in microlensing, thanks to external, synthetic and self-explanatory setup files containing all important commands and option settings. The user may choose to launch the code through command line instructions, or to import muLAn within another Python project like any standard Python package. It also comes with many useful routines (export publication-quality figures, data formatting and cleaning) and state-of-the-art statistical tools. The result of the modeling can be interpreted using an interactive html page which contains all information about the light curve model, caustics, source trajectory, best-fit parameters and chi-square. Parameters uncertainties and statistical properties (such as multi-modal features of the posterior density) can be assessed from correlation plots. The code includes all classical microlensing models (single and binary microlenses, ground- and space-based parallax effects, orbital motion, finite-source effects, limb-darkening, etc.) which can be combined into several time intervals of the analyzed light curve. Minimization methods include an Affine-Invariant Ensemble Sampler to generate a multivariate proposal function while running several Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, for the set of parameters which is chosen to be fit; non-fitting parameters can be either kept fixed or set on a grid defined by the user. Furthermore, the software offers a model-free option to align all data sets together and allows to inspect the light curve before any modeling work. The code is modular: users can add their own model's computation or minimization routines by directly adding their Python files without modifying the main code. This flexibility aims to offer a valuable framework to develop automated open-source microlensing modeling codes.

[ascl:1802.006] VISIBLE: VISIbility Based Line Extraction

VISIBLE applies approximated matched filters to interferometric data, allowing line detection directly in visibility space. The filter can be created from a FITS image or RADMC3D output image, and the weak line data can be a CASA MS or uvfits file. The filter response spectrum can be output either to a .npy file or returned back to the user for scripting.

[ascl:1802.005] Verne: Earth-stopping effect for heavy dark matter

Verne calculates the Earth-stopping effect for super-heavy Dark Matter (DM). The code allows you to calculate the speed distribution (and DM signal rate) at an arbitrary detector location on the Earth. The calculation takes into account the full anisotropic DM velocity distribution and the full velocity dependence of the DM-nucleus cross section. Results can be obtained for any DM mass and cross section, though the results are most reliable for very heavy DM particles.

[submitted] Opik Collision Probability

The Opik method gives the mean probability of collision of a small body with a given planet. It is a statistical value valid for an orbit with given (a,e,i) and undefined argument of perihelion. In some cases, the planet can eject the small body from the solar system; in these cases, the program estimates the mean time for the ejection. The Opik method does not take into account other perturbers than the planet considered, so it only provides an idea of the timescales involved.

[ascl:1802.004] ARTIP: Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline

The Automated Radio Telescope Image Processing Pipeline (ARTIP) automates the entire process of flagging, calibrating, and imaging for radio-interferometric data. ARTIP starts with raw data, i.e. a measurement set and goes through multiple stages, such as flux calibration, bandpass calibration, phase calibration, and imaging to generate continuum and spectral line images. Each stage can also be run independently. The pipeline provides continuous feedback to the user through various messages, charts and logs. It is written using standard python libraries and the CASA package. The pipeline can deal with datasets with multiple spectral windows and also multiple target sources which may have arbitrary combinations of flux/bandpass/phase calibrators.

[ascl:1802.003] CMacIonize: Monte Carlo photoionisation and moving-mesh radiation hydrodynamics

CMacIonize simulates the self-consistent evolution of HII regions surrounding young O and B stars, or other sources of ionizing radiation. The code combines a Monte Carlo photoionization algorithm that uses a complex mix of hydrogen, helium and several coolants in order to self-consistently solve for the ionization and temperature balance at any given time, with a standard first order hydrodynamics scheme. The code can be run as a post-processing tool to get the line emission from an existing simulation snapshot, but can also be used to run full radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Both the radiation transfer and the hydrodynamics are implemented in a general way that is independent of the grid structure that is used to discretize the system, allowing it to be run both as a standard fixed grid code and also as a moving-mesh code.

[ascl:1802.002] venice: Mask utility

venice reads a mask file (DS9 or fits type) and a catalogue of objects (ascii or fits type) to create a pixelized mask, find objects inside/outside a mask, or generate a random catalogue of objects inside/outside a mask. The program reads the mask file and checks if a point, giving its coordinates, is inside or outside the mask, i.e. inside or outside at least one polygon of the mask.

[submitted] PyCCF: Python Cross Correlation Function for reverberation mapping studies

PyCCF emulates a Fortran program written by B. Peterson for use with reverberation mapping. The code cross correlates two light curves that are unevenly sampled using linear interpolation and measures the peak and centroid of the cross-correlation function. In addition, it is possible to run Monto Carlo iterations using flux randomization and random subset selection (RSS) to produce cross-correlation centroid distributions to estimate the uncertainties in the cross correlation results.

[ascl:1802.001] FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

[ascl:1801.012] RadVel: General toolkit for modeling Radial Velocities

RadVel models Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) time series. The code is written in Python with a fast Kepler's equation solver written in C. It provides a framework for fitting RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and computing robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel can perform Bayesian model comparison and produces publication quality plots and LaTeX tables.

[ascl:1801.011] GABE: Grid And Bubble Evolver

GABE (Grid And Bubble Evolver) evolves scalar fields (as well as other purposes) on an expanding background for non-canonical and non-linear classical field theory. GABE is based on the Runge-Kutta method.

[ascl:1801.010] DICE/ColDICE: 6D collisionless phase space hydrodynamics using a lagrangian tesselation

DICE is a C++ template library designed to solve collisionless fluid dynamics in 6D phase space using massively parallel supercomputers via an hybrid OpenMP/MPI parallelization. ColDICE, based on DICE, implements a cosmological and physical VLASOV-POISSON solver for cold systems such as dark matter (CDM) dynamics.

[ascl:1801.009] Gnuastro: GNU Astronomy Utilities

Gnuastro (GNU Astronomy Utilities) manipulates and analyzes astronomical data. It is an official GNU package of a large collection of programs and C/C++ library functions. Command-line programs perform arithmetic operations on images, convert FITS images to common types like JPG or PDF, convolve an image with a given kernel or matching of kernels, perform cosmological calculations, crop parts of large images (possibly in multiple files), manipulate FITS extensions and keywords, and perform statistical operations. In addition, it contains programs to make catalogs from detection maps, add noise, make mock profiles with a variety of radial functions using monte-carlo integration for their centers, match catalogs, and detect objects in an image among many other operations. The command-line programs share the same basic command-line user interface for the comfort of both the users and developers. Gnuastro is written to comply fully with the GNU coding standards and integrates well with all Unix-like operating systems. This enables astronomers to expect a fully familiar experience in the source code, building, installing and command-line user interaction that they have seen in all the other GNU software that they use. Gnuastro's extensive library is included for users who want to build their own unique programs.

[ascl:1801.008] BOND: Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations

BOND determines oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions by comparison with a large grid of photoionization models. The grid spans a wide range in O/H, N/O and ionization parameter U, and covers different starburst ages and nebular geometries. Unlike other statistical methods, BOND relies on the [Ar III]/[Ne III] emission line ratio to break the oxygen abundance bimodality. By doing so, it can measure oxygen and nitrogen abundances without assuming any a priori relation between N/O and O/H. BOND takes into account changes in the hardness of the ionizing radiation field, which can come about due to the ageing of H II regions or the stochastically sampling of the IMF. The emission line ratio He I/Hβ, in addition to commonly used strong lines, constrains the hardness of the ionizing radiation field. BOND relies on the emission line ratios [O III]/Hβ, [O II]/Hβ and [N II]/Hβ, [Ar III]/Hβ, [Ne III]/Hβ, He I/Hβ as its input parameters, while its output values are the measurements and uncertainties for O/H and N/O.

[ascl:1801.007] cambmag: Magnetic Fields in CAMB

cambmag is a modification to CAMB (ascl:1102.026) that calculates the compensated magnetic mode in the scalar, vector and tensor case. Previously CAMB included code only for the vectors. It also corrects for tight-coupling issues and adds in the ability to include massive neutrinos when calculating vector modes.

[ascl:1801.006] DecouplingModes: Passive modes amplitudes

DecouplingModes calculates the amplitude of the passive modes, which requires solving the Einstein equations on superhorizon scales sourced by the anisotropic stress from the magnetic fields (prior to neutrino decoupling), and the magnetic and neutrino stress (after decoupling). The code is available as a Mathematica notebook.

[ascl:1801.005] InitialConditions: Initial series solutions for perturbations in our Universe

InitialConditions finds the initial series solutions for perturbations in our Universe. This includes all scalar (1 adiabatic, 4 isocurvature and 2 magnetic modes), vector (1 vorticity mode, 1 magnetic mode), and tensor (1 gravitational wave mode and 1 magnetic mode) perturbations including terms up to second order in the neutrino mass. It can handle the standard species (cdm, baryons, photons), and two neutrino mass eigenstates (1 light, 1 heavy).

[ascl:1801.004] hh0: Hierarchical Hubble Constant Inference

hh0 is a Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM) that describes the full distance ladder, from nearby geometric-distance anchors through Cepheids to SNe in the Hubble flow. It does not rely on any of the underlying distributions being Gaussian, allowing outliers to be modeled and obviating the need for any arbitrary data cuts.

[ascl:1801.003] Stan: Statistical inference

Stan facilitates statistical inference at the frontiers of applied statistics and provides both a modeling language for specifying complex statistical models and a library of statistical algorithms for computing inferences with those models. These components are exposed through interfaces in environments such as R, Python, and the command line.

[ascl:1801.002] iWander: Dynamics of interstellar wanderers

iWander assesses the origin of interstellar small bodies such as asteroids and comets. It includes a series of databases and tools that can be used in general for studying the dynamics of an interstellar vagabond object (small−body, interstellar spaceship and even stars).

[ascl:1801.001] BANYAN_Sigma: Bayesian classifier for members of young stellar associations

BANYAN_Sigma calculates the membership probability that a given astrophysical object belongs to one of the currently known 27 young associations within 150 pc of the Sun, using Bayesian inference. This tool uses the sky position and proper motion measurements of an object, with optional radial velocity (RV) and distance (D) measurements, to derive a Bayesian membership probability. By default, the priors are adjusted such that a probability threshold of 90% will recover 50%, 68%, 82% or 90% of true association members depending on what observables are input (only sky position and proper motion, with RV, with D, with both RV and D, respectively). The algorithm is implemented in a Python package, in IDL, and is also implemented as an interactive web page.

[submitted] A Neural Network for the Identification of Dangerous Planetesimals (Including scripts for data generation)

Two neural networks were designed to identify hazardous planetesimals that were trained on object trajectories calculated in a cloud computing environment. The first neural network was fully-connected and was trained on the orbital elements (OEs) of real/simulated planetesimals, while the second was a 1-dimensional convolutional neural network that was trained on the position Cartesian coordinates of real/simulated planetesimals. Ultimately, the network trained on OEs had a better performance by identifying one-third of known potentially hazardous objects including the 3 asteroids with the highest chance of impact with Earth (2009 FD, 1999 RQ36, 1950 DA) as established by NASA's Monte Carlo based Sentry system.

[submitted] loci: Smooth Cubic Multivariate Local Interpolations

loci is a shared library for interpolations in up to 4 dimensions. It is written in C and can be used with C/C++, Python and others. In order to calculate the coefficients of the cubic polynom, only local values are used: The data itself and all combinations of first-order derivatives, i.e. in 2D f_x, f_y and f_xy. This is in contrast to splines, where the coefficients are not calculated using derivatives, but non-local data, which can lead to over-smoothing the result.

[ascl:1712.016] LgrbWorldModel: Long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

LgrbWorldModel is written in Fortran 90 and attempts to model the population distribution of the Long-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of LGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution. The best-fit parameters of the distribution are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC) Sampler.

[ascl:1712.015] SgrbWorldModel: Short-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

SgrbWorldModel, written in Fortran 90, presents an attempt at modeling the population distribution of the Short-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of SGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution, whose differential cosmological rate of occurrence follows the Star-Formation-Rate (SFR) convolved with a log-normal binary-merger delay-time distribution. The best-fit parameters of the model are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by the BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC)Sampler that is part of the code. A model for the detection algorithm of the BATSE detectors is also provided.

[ascl:1712.014] QATS: Quasiperiodic Automated Transit Search

QATS detects transiting extrasolar planets in time-series photometry. It relaxes the usual assumption of strictly periodic transits by permitting a variable, but bounded, interval between successive transits.

[ascl:1712.013] photodynam: Photodynamical code for fitting the light curves of multiple body systems

Photodynam facilitates so-called "photometric-dynamical" modeling. This model is quite simple and this is reflected in the code base. A N-body code provides coordinates and the photometric code produces light curves based on coordinates.

[ascl:1712.012] MadDM: Computation of dark matter relic abundance

MadDM computes dark matter relic abundance and dark matter nucleus scattering rates in a generic model. The code is based on the existing MadGraph 5 architecture and as such is easily integrable into any MadGraph collider study. A simple Python interface offers a level of user-friendliness characteristic of MadGraph 5 without sacrificing functionality. MadDM is able to calculate the dark matter relic abundance in models which include a multi-component dark sector, resonance annihilation channels and co-annihilations. The direct detection module of MadDM calculates spin independent / spin dependent dark matter-nucleon cross sections and differential recoil rates as a function of recoil energy, angle and time. The code provides a simplified simulation of detector effects for a wide range of target materials and volumes.

[ascl:1712.011] FBEYE: Analyzing Kepler light curves and validating flares

FBEYE, the "Flares By-Eye" detection suite, is written in IDL and analyzes Kepler light curves and validates flares. It works on any 3-column light curve that contains time, flux, and error. The success of flare identification is highly dependent on the smoothing routine, which may not be suitable for all sources.

[ascl:1712.010] Flux Tube: Solar model

Flux Tube is a nonlinear, two-dimensional, numerical simulation of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations are applied to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized by a special boundary condition.

[ascl:1712.009] RODRIGUES: RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software

RODRIGUES (RATT Online Deconvolved Radio Image Generation Using Esoteric Software) is a web-based radio telescope simulation and reduction tool. From a technical perspective it is a web based parameterized docker container scheduler with a result set viewer.

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