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[ascl:2307.046] HAYASHI: Halo-level AnalYsis of the Absorption Signal in HI

HAYASHI (Halo-level AnalYsis of the Absorption Signal in HI) computes the number of absorption features of the 21cm forest using a semianalytic formalism. It includes the enhancement of the signal due to the presence of substructures within minihalos and supports non-standard cosmologies with impact in the large scale structure, such as warm dark matter and primordial black holes. HAYASHI is written in Python3 and uses the cosmological computations package Colossus (ascl:1501.016).

[ascl:1109.004] HAZEL: HAnle and ZEeman Light

A big challenge in solar and stellar physics in the coming years will be to decipher the magnetism of the solar outer atmosphere (chromosphere and corona) along with its dynamic coupling with the magnetic fields of the underlying photosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools for the physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations in suitably chosen spectral lines. HAZEL is a computer program for the synthesis and inversion of Stokes profiles caused by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, such as those of the He I 1083.0 nm and 587.6 nm (or D3) multiplets. It is based on the quantum theory of spectral line polarization, which takes into account in a rigorous way all the relevant physical mechanisms and ingredients (optical pumping, atomic level polarization, level crossings and repulsions, Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects). The influence of radiative transfer on the emergent spectral line radiation is taken into account through a suitable slab model. The user can either calculate the emergent intensity and polarization for any given magnetic field vector or infer the dynamical and magnetic properties from the observed Stokes profiles via an efficient inversion algorithm based on global optimization methods.

[ascl:2212.009] Hazma: Compute indirect detection constraints on sub-GeV dark matter

Hazma enables indirect detection of sub-GeV dark matter. It computes gamma-ray and electron/positron spectra from dark matter annihilations, sets limits on sub-GeV dark matter using existing gamma-ray data, and determines the discovery reach of future gamma-ray detectors. The code also derives accurate CMB constraints. Hazma comes with several sub-GeV dark matter models, for which it provides functions to compute dark matter annihilation cross sections and mediator decay widths. A variety of low-level tools are provided to make it straightforward to define new models.

[ascl:1711.022] HBT: Hierarchical Bound-Tracing

HBT is a Hierarchical Bound-Tracing subhalo finder and merger tree builder, for numerical simulations in cosmology. It tracks haloes from birth and continues to track them after mergers, finding self-bound structures as subhaloes and recording their merger histories as merger trees.

[ascl:1711.023] HBT+: Subhalo finder and merger tree builder

HBT+ is a hybrid subhalo finder and merger tree builder for cosmological simulations. It comes as an MPI edition that can be run on distributed clusters or shared memory machines and is MPI/OpenMP parallelized, and also as an OpenMP edition that can be run on shared memory machines and is only OpenMP parallelized. This version is more memory efficient than the MPI branch on shared memory machines, and is more suitable for analyzing zoomed-in simulations that are difficult to balance on distributed clusters. Both editions support hydro simulations with gas/stars.

[ascl:2012.023] HCGrid: Mapping non-uniform radio astronomy data onto a uniformly distributed grid

HCGrid maps non-uniform radio astronomy data onto a uniformly distributed grid using a convolution-based algorithm on CPU-GPU heterogeneous platforms. The package has three modules; the initialization module initializes parameters needed for the calculation process, such as setting the size of the sampling space and output resolution. The gridding module uses a parallel ordering algorithm to pre-order the sampling points based on HEALPix on the CPU platform and uses an efficient two-level lookup table to speed up the acquisition of sampling points; it then accelerates convolution by using the high parallelism of GPU and through related performance optimization strategies based on CUDA architecture to further improve the gridding performance. The third module processes the results; it visualizes the gridding and exports the final products as FITS files.

[ascl:2302.026] HDMSpectra: Dark Matter Spectra from the electroweak to the Planck scale

HDMSpectra computes the decay spectrum for dark matter with masses above the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking, down to Planck scale and including all relevant electroweak interactions. The code determines the distribution of stable states for photons, neutrinos, positrons, and antiprotons.

[ascl:1502.009] HDS: Hierarchical Data System

The Hierarchical Data System (HDS) is a file-based hierarchical data system designed for the storage of a wide variety of information. It is particularly suited to the storage of large multi-dimensional arrays (with their ancillary data) where efficient access is needed. It is a key component of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012) and is used by the Starlink N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) library (ascl:1411.023).

HDS organizes data into hierarchies, broadly similar to the directory structure of a hierarchical filing system, but contained within a single HDS container file. The structures stored in these files are self-describing and flexible; HDS supports modification and extension of structures previously created, as well as functions such as deletion, copying, and renaming. All information stored in HDS files is portable between the machines on which HDS is implemented. Thus, there are no format conversion problems when moving between machines. HDS can write files in a private binary format (version 4), or be layered on top of HDF5 (version 5).

[ascl:2301.004] HEADSS: HiErArchical Data Splitting and Stitching for non-distributed clustering algorithms

HEADSS (HiErArchical Data Splitting and Stitching) facilitates clustering at scale, unlike clustering algorithms that scale poorly with increased data volume or that are intrinsically non-distributed. HEADSS automates data splitting and stitching, allowing repeatable handling, and removal, of edge effects. Implemented in conjunction with scikit's HDBSCAN, the code achieves orders of magnitude reduction in single node memory requirements for both non-distributed and distributed implementations, with the latter offering similar order of magnitude reductions in total run times while recovering analogous accuracy. HEADSS also establishes a hierarchy of features by using a subset of clustering features to split the data.

[ascl:1107.018] HEALPix: Hierarchical Equal Area isoLatitude Pixelization of a sphere

HEALPix is an acronym for Hierarchical Equal Area isoLatitude Pixelization of a sphere. As suggested in the name, this pixelization produces a subdivision of a spherical surface in which each pixel covers the same surface area as every other pixel. Another property of the HEALPix grid is that the pixel centers occur on a discrete number of rings of constant latitude, the number of constant-latitude rings is dependent on the resolution of the HEALPix grid.

[ascl:2109.028] Healpix.jl: Julia-only port of the HEALPix library

Healpix.jl is a Julia-only port of the C/C++/Fortran/Python HEALPix library (ascl:1107.018), which implements a hierarchical pixelization of the sphere in equal-area pixels. Much like the original library, Healpix.jl supports two enumeration schemes for the pixels (RING and NESTED) and implements an optimized computation of the generalized Fourier transform using spherical harmonics, binding libsharp2 (ascl:1402.033). In addition, Healpix.jl provides four additional features: 1.) it fully supports Windows systems, alongside the usual Linux and MAC OS X machines; 2.) it uses Julia's strong typesystem to prevent several bugs related to mismatches in map ordering (e.g., combining a RING map with a NESTED map); 3.) it uses a versatile memory layout so that map bytes can be stored in shared memory objects or on GPUs; and 4.) it implements an elegant and general way to signal missing values in maps.

[ascl:2008.022] healpy: Python wrapper for HEALPix

healpy handles pixelated data on the sphere. It is based on the Hierarchical Equal Area isoLatitude Pixelization (HEALPix) scheme and bundles the HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) C++ library. healpy provides utilities to convert between sky coordinates and pixel indices in HEALPix nested and ring schemes and find pixels within a disk, a polygon or a strip in the sky. It can apply coordinate transformations between Galactic, Ecliptic and Equatorial reference frames, apply custom rotations either to vectors or full maps, and read and write HEALPix maps to disk in FITS format. healpy also includes utilities to upgrade and downgrade the resolution of existing HEALPix maps and transform maps to Spherical Harmonics space and back using multi-threaded C++ routines, among other utilities.

[ascl:1907.002] healvis: Radio interferometric visibility simulator based on HEALpix maps

Healvis simulates radio interferometric visibility off of HEALPix shells. It generates a flat-spectrum and a GSM model and computes visibilities, and can simulates visibilities given an Observation Parameter YAML file. Healvis can perform partial frequency simulations in serial to minimize instantaneous memory loads.

[ascl:2006.001] HEARSAY: Simulations for the probability of alien contact

HEARSAY computes simulations of the causal contacts between emitters in the Galaxy. It implements the Stochastic Constrained Causal Contact Network (SC3Net) model and explores the parameter space of the model for the emergence of communicating nodes through Monte Carlo simulations and analyzes their causal connections. This model for the abundance and duration of civilizations is based on minimal assumptions and three free parameters, with focus on the statistical properties of empirical models instead of an interpretable model with variables to be determined by observation.

[ascl:1408.004] HEAsoft: Unified Release of FTOOLS and XANADU

HEASOFT combines XANADU, high-level, multi-mission software for X-ray astronomical spectral, timing, and imaging data analysis tasks, and FTOOLS (ascl:9912.002), general and mission-specific software to manipulate FITS files, into one package. It also contains contains the NuSTAR subpackage of tasks, NuSTAR Data Analysis Software (NuSTARDAS). The source code for the software can be downloaded; precompiled executables for the most widely used computer platforms are also available for download. As an additional service, HEAsoft tasks can be directly from a web browser via WebHera.

[ascl:1506.009] HEATCVB: Coronal heating rate approximations

HEATCVB is a stand-alone Fortran 77 subroutine that estimates the local volumetric coronal heating rate with four required inputs: the radial distance r, the wind speed u, the mass density ρ, and the magnetic field strength |B0|. The primary output is the heating rate Qturb at the location defined by the input parameters. HEATCVB also computes the local turbulent dissipation rate of the waves, γ = Qturb/(2UA).

[ascl:1911.008] HeatingRate: Radioactive heating rate and macronova (kilonova) light curve

HeatingRate calculates the nuclear heating rates [erg/s/g] of beta-decay, alpha-decay, and spontaneous fission of r-process nuclei, taking into account for thermalization of gamma-rays and charged decay products in r-process ejecta. It uses the half-lives and injection energy spectra from an evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF/B-VII.1). Each heating rate is computed for given abundances, ejecta mass, velocity, and density profile. HeatingRate also computes the bolometric light curve and the evolution of the effective temperature for given abundances, ejecta mass, velocity, and density profile assuming opacities independent of the wavelength.

[ascl:2307.056] HELA: Random Forest retrieval for exoplanet atmospheres

HELA performs atmospheric retrieval on exoplanet atmospheres using a Random Forest algorithm. The code has two stages: training (which includes testing), and predicting. It requires a training set that matches the format of the data to be analyzed, with the same number of points and a sample spectrum for each parameter. The number of trees used and the number of jobs are editable. The HELA package includes a training set and data as examples.

[ascl:1903.017] HelioPy: Heliospheric and planetary physics library

HelioPy provides a set of tools to download and read in data, and carry out other common data processing tasks for heliospheric and planetary physics. It handles a wide variety of solar and satellite data and builds upon the SpiceyPy package (ascl:1903.016) to provide an accessible interface for performing orbital calculations. It has also implemented a framework to perform transformations between some common coordinate systems.

[ascl:1503.004] HELIOS-K: Opacity Calculator for Radiative Transfer

HELIOS-K is an opacity calculator for exoplanetary atmospheres. It takes a line list as an input and computes the line shapes of an arbitrary number of spectral lines (~millions to billions). HELIOS-K is capable of computing 100,000 spectral lines in 1 second; it is written in CUDA, is optimized for graphics processing units (GPUs), and can be used with the HELIOS radiative transfer code (ascl:1807.009).

[ascl:2207.010] Helios-r2: Bayesian nested-sampling retrieval code

Helios-r2 performs atmospheric retrieval of brown dwarf and exoplanet spectra. It uses a Bayesian statistics approach by employing a nested sampling method to generate posterior distributions and calculate the Bayesian evidence. The nested sampling itself is done by Multinest (ascl:1109.006). The computationally most demanding parts of the model have been written in NVIDIA's CUDA language for an increase in computational speed. Successful applications include retrieval of brown dwarf emission spectra and secondary eclipse measurements of exoplanets.

[ascl:1807.009] HELIOS: Radiative transfer code for exoplanetary atmospheres

HELIOS, a radiative transfer code, is constructed for studying exoplanetary atmospheres. The model atmospheres of HELIOS are one-dimensional and plane-parallel, and the equation of radiative transfer is solved in the two-stream approximation with non-isotropic scattering. Though HELIOS can be used alone, the opacity calculator HELIOS-K (ascl:1503.004) can be used with it to provide the molecular opacities.

[ascl:1805.019] HENDRICS: High ENergy Data Reduction Interface from the Command Shell

HENDRICS, a rewrite and update to MaLTPyNT (ascl:1502.021), contains command-line scripts based on Stingray (ascl:1608.001) to perform a quick-look (spectral-)timing analysis of X-ray data, treating the gaps in the data due, e.g., to occultation from the Earth or passages through the SAA, properly. Despite its original main focus on NuSTAR, HENDRICS can perform standard aperiodic timing analysis on X-ray data from, in principle, any other satellite, and its features include power density and cross spectra, time lags, pulsar searches with the Epoch folding and the Z_n^2 statistics, color-color and color-intensity diagrams. The periodograms produced by HENDRICS (such as a power density spectrum or a cospectrum) can be saved in a format compatible with XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) or ISIS (ascl:1302.002).

[ascl:2104.001] hera_opm: The HERA Online Processing Module

The hera_opm package provides a convenient and flexible framework for developing data analysis pipelines for operating on a sequence of input files. Though developed for application to the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA), it is a general package that can be applied to any workflow designed to apply a series of analysis steps to any type of files. It is also portable, operating both on a diversity of computer clusters with batch submission systems and local machines.

[ascl:1102.016] HERACLES: 3D Hydrodynamical Code to Simulate Astrophysical Fluid Flows

HERACLES is a 3D hydrodynamical code used to simulate astrophysical fluid flows. It uses a finite volume method on fixed grids to solve the equations of hydrodynamics, MHD, radiative transfer and gravity. This software is developed at the Service d'Astrophysique, CEA/Saclay as part of the COAST project and is registered under the CeCILL license. HERACLES simulates astrophysical fluid flows using a grid based Eulerian finite volume Godunov method. It is capable of simulating pure hydrodynamical flows, magneto-hydrodynamic flows, radiation hydrodynamic flows (using either flux limited diffusion or the M1 moment method), self-gravitating flows using a Poisson solver or all of the above. HERACLES uses cartesian, spherical and cylindrical grids.

[ascl:2209.002] Herculens: Differentiable gravitational lensing

Herculens models imaging data of strong gravitational lenses. The package supports various degrees of model complexity, ranging from standard smooth analytical profiles to pixelated models and machine learning approaches. In particular, it implements multiscale pixelated models regularized with sparsity constraints and wavelet decomposition, for modeling both the source light distribution and the lens potential. The code is fully differentiable - based on JAX (ascl:2111.002) - which enables fast convergence to the solution, access to the parameters covariance matrix, efficient exploration of the parameter space including the sampling of posterior distributions using variational inference or Hamiltonian Monte-Carlo methods.

[ascl:2107.030] HERMES: High-Energy Radiative MESsengers

The HERMES (High-Energy Radiative MESsengers) computational framework for line of sight integration creates sky maps in the HEALPix-compatibile format of various galactic radiative processes, including Faraday rotation, synchrotron and free-free radio emission, gamma-ray emission from pion-decay, bremsstrahlung and inverse-Compton. The code is written in C++ and provides numerous integrators, including dispersion measure, rotation measure, and Gamma-ray emissions from Dark Matter annihilation, among others.

[ascl:1808.005] hfof: Friends-of-Friends via spatial hashing

hfof is a 3-d friends-of-friends (FoF) cluster finder with Python bindings based on a fast spatial hashing algorithm that identifies connected sets of points where the point-wise connections are determined by a fixed spatial distance. This technique sorts particles into fine cells sufficiently compact to guarantee their cohabitants are linked, and uses locality sensitive hashing to search for neighboring (blocks of) cells. Tests on N-body simulations of up to a billion particles exhibit speed increases of factors up to 20x compared with FOF via trees, and is consistently complete in less than the time of a k-d tree construction, giving it an intrinsic advantage over tree-based methods.

[ascl:2103.002] hfs_fit: Atomic emission spectral line hyperfine structure fitting

hfs_fit performs parameter optimization in the analysis of emission line hyperfine structure (HFS). The code uses a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the magnetic dipole interaction constants, electric quadrupole interaction constants, Voigt profile widths and the center of gravity wavenumber for a given emission line profile. The fit can be changed visually with sliders for parameters, which is useful when HFS constants are unknown.

[ascl:1607.011] HfS: Hyperfine Structure fitting tool

HfS fits the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH3 (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive the NH3 column density, rotational temperature Trot, and kinetic temperature Tk. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters, with special attention to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

[ascl:1801.004] hh0: Hierarchical Hubble Constant Inference

hh0 is a Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM) that describes the full distance ladder, from nearby geometric-distance anchors through Cepheids to SNe in the Hubble flow. It does not rely on any of the underlying distributions being Gaussian, allowing outliers to be modeled and obviating the need for any arbitrary data cuts.

[submitted] HHTpywrapper: Python Wrapper for Hilbert–Huang Transform MATLAB Package

HHTpywrapper is a python interface to call the Hilbert–Huang Transform (HHT) MATLAB package. HHT is a time-frequency analysis method to adaptively decompose a signal, that could be generated by non-stationary and/or nonlinear processes, into basis components at different timescales, and then Hilbert transform these components into instantaneous phases, frequencies and amplitudes as functions of time. HHT has been successfully applied to analyzing X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from the active galactic nucleus RE J1034+396 (Hu et al. 2014) and two black hole X-ray binaries, XTE J1550–564 (Su et al. 2015) and GX 339-4 (Su et al. 2017). HHTpywrapper provides examples of reproducing HHT analysis results in Su et al. (2015) and Su et al. (2017). This project is originated from the Astro Hack Week 2015.

[ascl:1808.010] hi_class: Horndeski in the Cosmic Linear Anisotropy Solving System

hi_class implements Horndeski's theory of gravity in the modern Cosmic Linear Anisotropy Solving System (ascl:1106.020). It can be used to compute any cosmological observable at the level of background or linear perturbations, such as cosmological distances, cosmic microwave background, matter power and number count spectra (including relativistic effects). hi_class can be readily interfaced with Monte Python (ascl:1307.002) to test Gravity and Dark Energy models.

[ascl:2311.009] Hi-COLA: Cosmological large-scale structure simulator for Horndeski theories

Hi-COLA runs fast approximate N-body simulations of non-linear structure formation in reduced Horndeski gravity (Horndeski theories with luminal gravitational waves). It is generic with respect to the reduced Horndeski class. Given an input Lagrangian, Hi-COLA's front-end dynamically constructs the appropriate field equations and consistently solves for the cosmological background, linear growth, and screened fifth force of that theory. This is passed to the back-end, which runs a hybrid N-body simulation at significantly reduced computational and temporal cost compared to traditional N-body codes. By analyzing the particle snapshots, one can study the formation of structure through statistics such as the matter power spectrum.

[ascl:1606.004] HIBAYES: Global 21-cm Bayesian Monte-Carlo Model Fitting

HIBAYES implements fully-Bayesian extraction of the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization in the presence of foreground emission. User-defined likelihood and prior functions are called by the sampler PyMultiNest (ascl:1606.005) in order to jointly explore the full (signal plus foreground) posterior probability distribution and evaluate the Bayesian evidence for a given model. Implemented models, for simulation and fitting, include gaussians (HI signal) and polynomials (foregrounds). Some simple plotting and analysis tools are supplied. The code can be extended to other models (physical or empirical), to incorporate data from other experiments, or to use alternative Monte-Carlo sampling engines as required.

[ascl:1607.019] HIDE: HI Data Emulator

HIDE (HI Data Emulator) forward-models the process of collecting astronomical radio signals in a single dish radio telescope instrument and outputs pixel-level time-ordered-data. Written in Python, HIDE models the noise and RFI modeling of the data and with its companion code SEEK (ascl:1607.020) provides end-to-end simulation and processing of radio survey data.

[ascl:2007.002] hierArc: Hierarchical analysis of strong gravitational lenses

hierArc hierarchically infers strong lensing mass density profiles and the cosmological parameters, in particular the Hubble constant. The software supports lenses with imaging data and kinematics, and optionally time delays. The kinematics modeling is performed in conjunction with lenstronomy (ascl:1804.012).

[ascl:2005.008] HiFLEx: Echelle data reduction pipeline

HiFLEx reduces echelle data taken with a single or bifurcated fiber input. It takes a FITS image file (i.e., a CCD image) and runs data reduction steps, extracts out orders from an Echelle spectrograph (regardless of separation and curvature, as long as orders are distinguishable from one-another), applies the wavelength correction, measures the radial velocity, and performs further calibration steps.

[ascl:1802.007] HiGal_SED_Fitter: SED fitting tools for Herschel Hi-Gal data

HiGal SED Fitter fits modified blackbody SEDs to Herschel data, specifically targeted at Herschel Hi-Gal data.

[ascl:1207.002] HiGPUs: Hermite's N-body integrator running on Graphic Processing Units

HiGPUs is an implementation of the numerical integration of the classical, gravitational, N-body problem, based on a 6th order Hermite’s integration scheme with block time steps, with a direct evaluation of the particle-particle forces. The main innovation of this code is its full parallelization, exploiting both OpenMP and MPI in the use of the multicore Central Processing Units as well as either Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) or OpenCL for the hosted Graphic Processing Units. We tested both performance and accuracy of the code using up to 256 GPUs in the supercomputer IBM iDataPlex DX360M3 Linux Infiniband Cluster provided by the italian supercomputing consortium CINECA, for values of N ≤ 8 millions. We were able to follow the evolution of a system of 8 million bodies for few crossing times, task previously unreached by direct summation codes.

HiGPUs is also available as part of the AMUSE project.

[ascl:1807.008] HII-CHI-mistry_UV: Oxygen abundance and ionizionation parameters for ultraviolet emission lines

HII-CHI-mistry_UV derives oxygen and carbon abundances using the ultraviolet (UV) lines emitted by the gas phase ionized by massive stars. The code first fixes C/O using ratios of appropriate emission lines and, in a second step, calculates O/H and the ionization parameter from carbon lines in the UV. An optical version of this Python code, HII-CHI-mistry (ascl:1807.007), is also available.

[ascl:1807.007] HII-CHI-mistry: Oxygen abundance and ionizionation parameters for optical emission lines

HII-CHI-mistry calculates the oxygen abundance for gaseous nebulae ionized by massive stars using optical collisionally excited emission lines. This code takes the extinction-corrected emission line fluxes and, based on a Χ2 minimization on a photoionization models grid, determines chemical-abundances (O/H, N/O) and ionization parameters. An ultraviolet version of this Python code, HII-CHI-mistry-UV (ascl:1807.008), is also available.

[ascl:1603.017] HIIexplorer: Detect and extract integrated spectra of HII regions

HIIexplorer detects and extracts the integrated spectra of HII regions from IFS datacubes. The procedure assumes H ii regions are peaky/isolated structures with a strong ionized gas emission, clearly above the continuum emission and the average ionized gas emission across the galaxy and that H ii regions have a typical physical size of about a hundred or a few hundreds of parsecs, which corresponds to a typical projected size at the distance of the galaxies of a few arcsec for galaxies at z~0.016. All input parameters can be derived from either a visual inspection and/or a statistical analysis of the Hα emission line map. The algorithm produces a segmentation FITS file describing the pixels associated to each H ii region. A newer version of this code, pyHIIexplorer (ascl:2206.010), is available.

[ascl:1405.005] HIIPHOT: Automated Photometry of H II Regions

HIIPHOT enables accurate photometric characterization of H II regions while permitting genuine adaptivity to irregular source morphology. It makes a first guess at the shapes of all sources through object recognition techniques; it then allows for departure from such idealized "seeds" through an iterative growing procedure and derives photometric corrections for spatially coincident diffuse emission from a low-order surface fit to the background after exclusion of all detected sources.

[ascl:2104.003] Hilal-Obs: Authentication agorithm for new moon visibility report

Hilal-Obs authenticates lunar crescent first visibility reports. The code, written in Python, uses PyEphem (ascl:1112.014) for astrometrics, and takes into account all the factors that affect lunar crescent visibility, including atmospheric extinction, observer physiology, sky and lunar brightness, contrast threshold, and the type of observation.

[ascl:2307.031] HilalPy: Analysis tool for lunar crescent visibility criterion

HilalPy analyzes lunar crescent visibility criteria. Written in Python, the code uses more than 8000 lunar crescent visibility records extracted from literature and websites of lunar crescent observation, descriptive statistics, contradiction rate percentage, and regression analysis in its analysis to predict the visibility of a lunar crescent.

[ascl:2301.008] HiLLiPoP: High-L Likelihood Polarized for Planck

HiLLiPoP is a multifrequency CMB likelihood for Planck data. The likelihood is a spectrum-based Gaussian approximation for cross-correlation spectra from Planck 100, 143 and 217GHz split-frequency maps, with semi-analytic estimates of the Cl covariance matrix based on the data. The cross-spectra are debiased from the effects of the mask and the beam leakage using Xpol (ascl:2301.009) before being compared to the model, which includes CMB and foreground residuals. They cover the multipoles from ℓ=30 to ℓ=2500. HiLLiPoP is interfaced with the Cobaya (ascl:1910.019) MCMC sampler.

[ascl:1111.001] HIPE: Herschel Interactive Processing Environment

The Herschel Space Observatory is the fourth cornerstone mission in the ESA science programme and performs photometry and spectroscopy in the 55 - 672 micron range. The development of the Herschel Data Processing System started in 2002 to support the data analysis for Instrument Level Tests. The Herschel Data Processing System was used for the pre-flight characterisation of the instruments, and during various ground segment test campaigns. Following the successful launch of Herschel 14th of May 2009 the Herschel Data Processing System demonstrated its maturity when the first PACS preview observation of M51 was processed within 30 minutes of reception of the first science data after launch. Also the first HIFI observations on DR21 were successfully reduced to high quality spectra, followed by SPIRE observations on M66 and M74. A fast turn-around cycle between data retrieval and the production of science-ready products was demonstrated during the Herschel Science Demonstration Phase Initial Results Workshop held 7 months after launch, which is a clear proof that the system has reached a good level of maturity.

[ascl:2301.030] HIPP: HIgh-Performance Package for scientific computation

HIPP (HIgh-Performance Package for scientific computation) provides elegant interfaces for some well-known HPC libraries. Some libraries are wrapped with full-OOP interfaces, and many new extensions based on those raw-interfaces are also provided. This C++ toolkit for HPC can significantly reduce the length of your code, making programming more productive.

[ascl:2005.020] HIPSTER: HIgh-k Power Spectrum EstimatoR

HIPSTER (HIgh-k Power Spectrum EstimatoR) computes small-scale power spectra and isotropic bispectra for cosmological simulations and galaxy surveys of arbitrary shape. The code computes the Legendre multipoles of the power spectrum, P(k), or bispectrum B(k1,k2), by computing weighted pair counts over the simulation box or survey, truncated at some maximum radius. The code can be run either in 'aperiodic' or 'periodic' mode for galaxy surveys or cosmological simulations respectively. HIPSTER also supports weighted spectra, for example when tracer particles are weighted by their mass in a multi-species simulation. Generalization to anisotropic bispectra is straightforward (and requires no additional computing time) and can be added on request.

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